Annual Security Report

CSU Campus

pdf icon Annual Security & Fire Safety Report 2022

2022 Combined Annual Security Report & Fire Safety Report

The Security and Fire Safety report is provided in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act, as amended. It provides students and employees of Chicago State University ("University") with information on: the University's security arrangements, policies and procedures; programs that provide education on such things as drug and alcohol abuse, awareness of various kinds of sex offenses, and the prevention of crime generally; and procedures the University will take to notify the campus community in the event of an emergency. The purpose of the report is to provide guidance and instructions to students and employees to aid in making informed decisions related to their own safety and the safety of others.

Policy for Preparing the Annual Report

This report is prepared by the Chief of Police, in cooperation with local law enforcement authorities, to offer information by the University's campus security authorities and various sources from the University. Each year an e-mail notification is sent to all enrolled students and employees including the website link to access the report. Prospective students and employees are also notified of the report's availability. Hard copies of the report may also be obtained at no cost by contacting Eddie L. Welch, III, Chief of Police Chicago State University, Police Department, 9501 South King Drive, Suite O&M 210 Chicago, IL 60628. The University is committed to taking the actions necessary to provide a safe and secure working and learning environment for all students and staff. As a member of the campus community, Campus Security assures that security procedures are established to represent best practices in the field, and are constantly tested and re-evaluated for their effectiveness.

Campus Security Personnel & Relationship with Local Law Enforcement

The Chicago State University Police Department is responsible for campus safety at the University.

Authority for the Chicago State University Police Department is stipulated in the Illinois Compiled Statues at 110 ILCS 660/5-45(11). Members of the Chicago State University Police Department shall be conservators of the peace and, as such, have all powers possessed by policemen in cities, and sheriffs in counties, including the power to make arrests on view or warrants of violations of State Statues and city or county ordinances.

While Chicago State University Police Department does not have any contracts with other law enforcement agencies, it does maintain close working relationships with local and surrounding municipalities, county, state and federal law enforcement agencies.

Campus Security Authorities

The University has designated certain officials to serve as campus security authorities. Reports of criminal activity can be made to these officials. The campus security authorities assure that the reported crimes are filed in a collection as part of the annual report of crime statistics for Chicago State University. The campus security authorities to whom the University would prefer that crimes be reported are listed below.

  • Athletics (773) 995-2296
  • Housing & Residence Life (773) 995-4543
  • Human Resources (773) 995-2040
  • Judicial Affairs (773) 821-2156
  • Latino Resource Center (773) 995-2526
  • LGBQT (773) 821-2180
  • Student Affairs (773) 995-4510
  • Title IX (773) 995-3582
  • University Police (773) 995-2111
  • Wellness Center (773) 995-2010

Reporting a Crime or Emergency

The University encourages accurate and prompt reporting of all criminal actions, emergencies, or other incidents occurring on: campus, University owned property, or nearby public property, to the appropriate administrator and police agencies. Such a report is encouraged even when the complainant of a crime elects not to make a report or is unable to do so.

  • All crimes occurring on or near Chicago State University property should be reported immediately to the Chicago State University Police Department at (773) 995-2111. A dispatcher is available 24/7.
  • If a crime is in progress, or there is some other situation posing imminent danger, local law enforcement can be telephoned at (773) 995-2111 (CSU), or 911 (Chicago Police Department (CPD)).
  • Students, staff, and visitors should report situations to one of the campus security authorities identified above. Once reported, the individual may also be encouraged to report the situation to the appropriate police agency. If requested, a University staff member will assist in making a report to police.
  • Anonymous incident reports can also be made by dialing (773) 821-2882.

Confidential Reporting

The University will protect the confidentiality of complainants. Only those with a need to know the identity for purposes of investigating the crime, assisting the complainant or disciplining the responding party will know the identity of the complainant.

Chicago State University is committed to respecting the privacy of all parties involved. Some level of disclosure, however, may be necessary to ensure a complete and fair investigation, although Chicago State University will comply with requests for confidentiality to the extent possible. No promise of non-action or anonymity can be made once a complaint has been reported. Chicago State University has a legal duty to conduct an investigation. Information will be released on a need-to-know basis. Within these constraints, all parties involved are requested to maintain confidentiality and respect privacy. Publicly available records will be permissible by law. Students may speak confidentially to licensed mental health counselors employed by Chicago State University to provide counseling services in the Counseling Center as well as to the Chicago State University Chaplain. These resources provide students who may be interested in bringing a complaint of sexual misconduct or harassment with a confidential place to discuss their concerns.

Anonymous reports may be made with the Title IX Coordinator in the Office of Legal Affairs ((773) 995-3582) or by calling the anonymous tip hotline at (773) 821-2882 and leaving a voice message, however, the more information Chicago State University has about the sexual harassment or misconduct, the better it can prevent and redress it. Chicago State University may be limited in its investigation if it does not have information specific to a complaint.

The University encourages its pastoral and professional counselors, if and when they deem it appropriate, to inform the person they are counseling to report crimes on a voluntary, confidential basis for inclusion in the annual report of crime statistics.

Security of and Access to Campus Facilities

Most campus buildings and facilities are accessible to members of the campus community, guests and visitors during normal hours of business (Monday through Friday) and for limited designated hours on Saturday. The Chicago State University Police Department provides 24-hour patrol of all the University property, buildings, parking lots, and the residence hall. All laws are enforced on the campus, including rules and regulations established by Chicago State University for the campus community. 

Officers are responsible for reporting and investigating all crimes, issuing traffic citations, parking tickets, responding to medical emergencies, traffic accidents involving University property or injury, reports of fire, as well as other incidents that require police assistance. 

Residence Hall: The Chicago State University Residence Hall policy requires that exterior doors (rear doors) be locked at all times and the front entrance is manned at all times. All residents are issued a key card and/or key for personal access to their individual room. A resident must accompany all guests.

Security Considerations in the Maintenance of Facilities

Members of the Chicago State University Police Department and campus community continually evaluate security and safety conditions on campus. Members of the Chicago State University Police Department report security concerns, such as lighting and road hazards, and make recommendations for correction. The campus community is encouraged to report any safety concerns, exterior lighting, or emergency telephone malfunctions to the Physical Facilities Planning & Management Office at (773) 995-2140 or to the Chicago State University Police Department at (773) 995-2113.

Educational Programs Related to Security Awareness and Prevention of Criminal Activity

The University seeks to enhance the security of its campus and the members of the campus community by periodically presenting educational programs to inform students and employees about campus security procedures and practices, to encourage students and employees to be responsible for their own security and the security of others and to inform them about the prevention of crimes. These programs are discussed below.

The best means available to the Police for prevention of crime is aggressive patrol of Chicago State University property by uniformed officers on foot, on bikes, and in conspicuously marked cars. Foot patrol by teams of Police Officers is one of the most important crime prevention tools utilized by Police. Vertical patrol of buildings including stairwells, elevators, breezeways and corridors provides police visibility to residents and deters criminal behaviors by those who would prey upon residents. 

The Chicago State University Police Department has established programs that serve to raise the level of safety awareness of the campus community. These programs are conducted periodically and are available upon request. These programs include but are not limited to:

  • Crime Prevention
  • Personal Safety
  • CPD First Aide
  • Campus Security Authority Training (CSA)
  • Fire Safety (Fire Safety Training)

Monitoring Off Campus Locations of Recognized Student Organizations

The University does not have any officially recognized student organizations with off campus locations and therefore does not monitor or record criminal conduct occurring at such locations.

Disclosure of the Outcome of a Crime of Violence or Non-Forcible Sex Offense

Upon written request, the University will disclose to the alleged complainant of a crime of violence (as that term is defined in section 16 of title 18, United States Code), or a non-forcible sex offense, the report on the results of any disciplinary proceeding conducted by the University against a student who is the alleged responding party of such crime or offense. If the alleged complainant is deceased as a result of such crime or offense, the next of kin of such complainant shall be treated as the alleged complainant for purposes of the paragraph.

The previous paragraph does not apply to complainants of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking because under the Violence Against Women Act both the accused and accuser in these cases are given the results without the need to make a written request.

This policy is being distributed and applies to all students enrolled at Chicago State University in compliance with the provisions of the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 (41 U.S.C., Section 701, et. seq.) and the Drug-Free Schools Act of 1989 (34 C.F.R. 86, et. seq.) and all employees who work on the Chicago State University campus and in workplaces controlled by Chicago State University.

The University absolutely prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of controlled substance or alcohol on University premises or while conducting University business off University premises. Students who violate this policy will be referred to the Office of Student Affairs for disciplinary action in accordance with the policy on Student Conduct.  Students in need of counseling related to alcohol or controlled substance use/abuse may contact the University Counseling Center Substance Abuse Referral Officer at (773) 995-2383.  Employees found in violation of this policy may result in immediate termination of employment or other appropriate disciplinary actions. 

Federal Drug Laws (updated 08.04.2022)

Denial of Federal Benefits (21 U.S.C. § 862) A federal drug conviction may result in the loss of federal benefits, including school loans, grants, scholarships, contracts, and licenses. Federal drug trafficking convictions may result in denial of federal benefits for up to five years for a first conviction. Federal drug convictions for possession may result in denial of federal benefits for up to one year for a first conviction and up to five years for subsequent convictions, successful completion of a drug treatment program, including periodic testing, and appropriate community service, or any combination of the three.

Forfeiture of Personal Property and Real Estate (21 U.S.C. § 853) Any person convicted of a federal drug offense punishable by more than one year in prison shall forfeit to the United States any personal or real property related to the violation. A warrant of seizure may be issued and property seized at the time an individual is arrested on charges that may result in forfeiture.

Federal Drug Trafficking Penalties (21 U.S.C. § 841) Penalties for federal drug trafficking convictions vary according to the type and quantity of the controlled substance involved in the transaction. Penalties for subsequent convictions are more severe.

In the case of a controlled substance in schedule I or schedule II, GHB, or flunitrazepam, a person shall be sentenced to a term of imprisonment of not more than 20 years. If death or serious bodily injury results from the use of a controlled substance, which has been illegally distributed, the person convicted on federal charges of distributing the substance faces the possibility of a life sentence and fines ranging up to $10 million.

In the case of a controlled substance in schedule III, a person shall be sentenced to a term of imprisonment of not more than 10 years, and if death or serious bodily injury results, shall be sentenced to a term of imprisonment of not more than 15 years or a fine not to exceed $500,000, or both, for a first offense.

For less than 50 kilograms of marijuana, the term of imprisonment shall not be more than five years, and the fine shall not be more than $250,000, or both, for a first offense.

In the case of a schedule IV substance, the term of imprisonment shall not be more than five years, and the fine shall not be more than $250,000, or both, for a first offense.

Persons convicted on federal charges of drug trafficking within 1,000 feet of an elementary school, secondary school, college, or university (21 U.S.C. § 860) face penalties of prison terms and fines which are twice as high as the regular penalties for the offense, with a mandatory prison sentence of at least one year, unless the offense involves five grams or less of marijuana.

Federal Drug Possession Penalties (21 U.S.C. § 844) Persons convicted on federal charges of possessing any controlled substance face penalties of up to one year in prison, a mandatory fine of no less than $1,000, or both. Second convictions are punishable by not less than 15 days but not more than two years in prison and a minimum fine of $2,500. Subsequent convictions are punishable by not less than 90 days but not more than three years in prison and a minimum fine of $5,000.

Drug and Alcohol State Laws

Category

Summary (Illinois Compiled Statutes)

Possession of Marijuana

Illinois’ Cannabis Control Act can be found at 720 ILCS 550/1 et seq. With certain exceptions, it is unlawful for any person to knowingly possess cannabis. Possessing no more than 10 grams is a civil violation punishable by a minimum fine of $100 and a maximum fine of $200. Possessing more than 10 grams but not more than 30 grams is a Class B misdemeanor, which can include a prison sentence of up to 6 months and a fine of up to $1,500. As the amount of cannabis increases, the crime classification becomes more severe and related penalties increase.

Possession of less than 2.5 grams of any substance containing cannabis with intent to deliver on school grounds with persons under the age of 18 present or reasonably expected to be present is a Class A misdemeanor, with penalties and classification increasing with amount possessed. See 720 ILCS 550/5.2.

Illinois residents age 21 and older may legally purchase recreational cannabis and possess up to 30 grams of cannabis flower. The possession limit is 15 grams of cannabis flower for non-Illinois residents. 410 ILCS 705/10-10. It is unlawful for individuals under the age of 21 to purchase, possess, use, transport, grow, or consume cannabis, except where otherwise authorized for medical purposes. 410 ILCS 705/10-15.

Controlled Substances

Illinois Controlled Substances Act covers a wide range of offenses related to controlled substances. See 720 ILCS 570/401 et seq. Penalties for the possession and delivery of illegal drugs include prison sentences and monetary fines. These vary widely by the type of drug, amount confiscated, the number of previous offenses by the individual, and whether the individual intended to manufacture, sell, or use the drug. Trafficking controlled substances will result in more severe penalties.

There are higher penalties and different crime classifications when the offender possesses the controlled substance with the intent to manufacture or deliver on school grounds or within 500 feet of the real property comprising any school. See 720 ILCS 570/407.

As an example, possession of more than 15 grams but less than 100 grams of heroin, cocaine, morphine, or LSD is punishable by a fine of up to $200,000 and 4 to 15 years in prison.

Alcohol and Minors

With very limited exceptions, it is illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to possess or consume alcohol, and it is also illegal to use fake identification for the purpose of obtaining alcohol. See 235 ILCS 5/6-20. A violation is a Class A misdemeanor, which can include a prison sentence of up to 1 year and a fine of up to $2,500. Courts have discretion to also impose other penalties like probation, community service, driver’s license suspension, and alcohol education or treatment when a minor violates the state’s alcohol laws.

No person, after purchasing or otherwise obtaining alcoholic liquor, shall sell, give, or deliver such alcoholic liquor to another person under the age of 21 years, except in the performance of a religious ceremony or service. See 235 ILCS 5/6-16(a)(iii). A violation is a Class A misdemeanor, and the sentence shall include, but shall not be limited to, a fine of not less than $500 for a first offense and not less than $2,000 for a second or subsequent offense.

Driving Under the Influence (DUI)

Driving while under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs is prohibited. See 625 ILCS 5/11-501. A violation occurs when a person is driving or physically controlling a motor vehicle with a blood or breath alcohol concentration of 0.08 percent or greater. A violation may also occur when driving is impaired due to the driver being under the influence of alcohol and/or other drugs (even if BAC is not 0.08 percent or greater). A DUI is a Class A misdemeanor, which can include a prison sentence of up to 1 year and a fine of up to $2,500. Increased penalties are available for subsequent offenses and other aggravating circumstances (i.e., getting a DUI while transporting a person under the age of 16).

Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program

The University has a drug and alcohol abuse and prevention program and conducts a biennial review of this program to evaluate its effectiveness.  All referrals to this program will be administered by the Chicago State University Counseling Department who can be reached at (773) 995-2383 or click here.

Consistent with applicable laws, the University prohibits dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. The University's policy used to address complaints of this nature, as well as the procedures for filing, investigating and resolving complaints, may be found at:

The following sections of this report discuss the University's educational programs to promote the awareness of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking; provides information concerning procedures students and employees should follow and the services available in the event they do become a complainant of one of these offenses, and advises students and employees of the disciplinary procedures that will be followed after an allegation that one of these offenses has occurred.

Primary Prevention and Awareness Program

The University conducts an annual Primary Prevention and Awareness Program (PPAP) for all students and employees. The PPAP advises campus community members that the University prohibits the offenses of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking. Additionally, the campus community is informed of the topics discussed below, including relevant definitions, risk reduction, and bystander intervention.

Crime Definitions

Crime Type (Illinois Compiled Statutes)

Definitions

Dating Violence

The institution has determined, based on good-faith research that Illinois law does not define the term dating violence.

Domestic Violence

Illinois' Domestic Violence Act indicates that "domestic violence" means "abuse", which means physical abuse, harassment, intimidation of a dependent, interference with personal liberty or willful deprivation but does not include reasonable direction of a minor child by a parent or person in loco parentis. (750 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 60/103).

In addition, Illinois law includes the following:

  • Domestic Battery (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/12-3.2): A person commits domestic battery if he or she knowingly without legal justification: (1) Causes bodily harm to any family or household member; (2) Makes physical contact of an insulting or provoking nature with any family or household member.
  • Aggravated Domestic Battery (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/12-3.3): (a) A person who, in committing a domestic battery, knowingly causes great bodily harm, or permanent disability or disfigurement commits aggravated domestic battery. (a-5) A person who, in committing a domestic battery, strangles another individual commits aggravated domestic battery. For the purposes of this subsection (a-5), "strangle" means intentionally impeding the normal breathing or circulation of the blood of an individual by applying pressure on the throat or neck of that individual or by blocking the nose or mouth of that individual.
  • For purposes of the above crimes, "family or household members" is defined at 720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/12-0.1 as: "Family or household members" include spouses, former spouses, parents, children, stepchildren, and other persons related by blood or by present or prior marriage, persons who share or formerly shared a common dwelling, persons who have or allegedly have a child in common, persons who share or allegedly share a blood relationship through a child, persons who have or have had a dating or engagement relationship, persons with disabilities and their personal assistants, and caregivers as defined in Section 12-4.4a of this Code. For purposes of this Article, neither a casual acquaintanceship nor ordinary fraternization between 2 individuals in business or social contexts shall be deemed to constitute a dating relationship.

Stalking

Stalking (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/12-7.3):

  • A person commits stalking when he or she knowingly engages in a course of conduct directed at a specific person, and he or she knows or should know that this course of conduct would cause a reasonable person to: (1) fear for his or her safety or the safety of a third person; or (2) suffer other emotional distress.
  • A person commits stalking when he or she, knowingly and without lawful justification, on at least 2 separate occasions follows another person or places the person under surveillance or any combination thereof and: (1) at any time transmits a threat of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement or restraint and the threat is directed towards that person or a family member of that person; or (2) places that person in reasonable apprehension of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement or restraint to or of that person or a family member of that person.
  • A person commits stalking when he or she has previously been convicted of stalking another person and knowingly and without lawful justification on one occasion: (1) follows that same person or places that same person under surveillance; and (2) transmits a threat of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement or restraint to that person or a family member of that person.
  • A person commits stalking when he or she knowingly makes threats that are part of a course of conduct and is aware of the threatening nature of his or her speech.

Aggravated Stalking (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/12-7.4): A person commits aggravated stalking when he or she commits stalking and: (1) causes bodily harm to the victim; (2) confines or restrains the victim; or (3) violates a temporary restraining order, an order of protection, a stalking no contact order, a civil no contact order, or an injunction prohibiting the behavior described in subsection (b)(1) of Section 214 of the Illinois Domestic Violence Act of 1986.

Cyberstalking (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/12-7.5):

  • A person commits cyberstalking when he or she engages in a course of conduct using electronic communication directed at a specific person, and he or she knows or should know that would cause a reasonable person to: (1) fear for his or her safety or the safety of a third person; or (2) suffer other emotional distress.
  • A person commits cyberstalking when he or she, knowingly and without lawful justification, on at least 2 separate occasions, harasses another person through the use of electronic communication and: (1) at any time transmits a threat of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement, or restraint and the threat is directed towards that person or a family member of that person; or (2) places that person or a family member of that person in reasonable apprehension of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement, or restraint; or (3) at any time knowingly solicits the commission of an act by any person which would be a violation of this Code directed towards that person or a family member of that person.
  • A person commits cyberstalking when he or she knowingly, surreptitiously, and without lawful justification, installs or otherwise places electronic monitoring software or spyware on an electronic communication device as a means to harass another person and: (1) at any time transmits a threat of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement, or restraint and the threat is directed towards that person or a family member of that person; (2) places that person or a family member of that person in reasonable apprehension of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement or restraint; or (3) at any time knowingly solicits the commission of an act by any person which would be a violation of this Code directed towards that person or a family member of that person.
  • A person commits cyberstalking when he or she, knowingly and without lawful justification, creates and maintains an Internet website or webpage which is accessible to one or more third parties for a period of at least 24 hours, and which contains statements harassing another person and: (1) which communicates a threat of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement, or restraint, where the threat is directed towards that person or a family member of that person, or (2) which places that person or a family member of that person in reasonable apprehension of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement, or restraint, or (3) which knowingly solicits the commission of an act by any person which would be a violation of this Code directed towards that person or a family member of that person.

Sexual Assault

Criminal Sexual Assault (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/11-1.20): A person commits criminal sexual assault if that person commits an act of sexual penetration and: (1) uses force or threat of force; (2) knows that the victim is unable to understand the nature of the act or is unable to give knowing consent; (3) is a family member of the victim, and the victim is under 18 years of age; or (4) is 17 years of age or over and holds a position of trust, authority, or supervision in relation to the victim, and the victim is at least 13 years of age but under 18 years of age.

Aggravated Criminal Sexual Assault (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/11-1.30):

  1. A person commits aggravated criminal sexual assault if that person commits criminal sexual assault and any of the following aggravating circumstances exist during the commission of the offense or, for purposes of paragraph (7), occur as part of the same course of conduct as the commission of the offense: (1) the person displays, threatens to use, or uses a dangerous weapon, other than a firearm, or any other object fashioned or used in a manner that leads the victim, under the circumstances, reasonably to believe that the object is a dangerous weapon; (2) the person causes bodily harm to the victim, except as provided in paragraph (10); (3) the person acts in a manner that threatens or endangers the life of the victim or any other person; (4) the person commits the criminal sexual assault during the course of committing or attempting to commit any other felony; (5) the victim is 60 years of age or older; (6) the victim is a person with a physical disability; (7) the person delivers (by injection, inhalation, ingestion, transfer of possession, or any other means) any controlled substance to the victim without the victim's consent or by threat or deception for other than medical purposes; (8) the person is armed with a firearm; (9) the person personally discharges a firearm during the commission of the offense; or (10) the person personally discharges a firearm during the commission of the offense, and that discharge proximately causes great bodily harm, permanent disability, permanent disfigurement, or death to another person.
  2. A person commits aggravated criminal sexual assault if that person is under 17 years of age and: (i) commits an act of sexual penetration with a victim who is under 9 years of age; or (ii) commits an act of sexual penetration with a victim who is at least 9 years of age but under 13 years of age and the person uses force or threat of force to commit the act.
  3. A person commits aggravated criminal sexual assault if that person commits an act of sexual penetration with a victim who is a person with a severe or profound intellectual disability.

Predatory Criminal Sexual Assault of a Child (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/11-1.40): A person commits predatory criminal sexual assault of a child if that person is 17 years of age or older, and commits an act of contact, however slight, between the sex organ or anus of one person and the part of the body of another for the purpose of sexual gratification or arousal of the victim or the accused, or an act of sexual penetration, and: (1) the victim is under 13 years of age; or (2) the victim is under 13 years of age and that person: (A) is armed with a firearm; (B) personally discharges a firearm during the commission of the offense; (C) causes great bodily harm to the victim that: (i) results in permanent disability; or (ii) is life threatening; or (D) delivers (by injection, inhalation, ingestion, transfer of possession, or any other means) any controlled substance to the victim without the victim's consent or by threat or deception, for other than medical purposes.

Rape, Fondling, Incest, Statutory Rape

For purposes of the Clery Act, the term "sexual assault" includes the offenses of rape, fondling, incest, and statutory rape. The institution has determined, based on good-faith research, that Illinois law does not define these terms.

Other "sexual assault" crimes

Other crimes under Illinois law that may be classified as a "sexual assault" include the following:

Criminal Sexual Abuse (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/11-1.50):

  1. A person commits criminal sexual abuse if that person: (1) commits an act of sexual conduct by the use of force or threat of force; or (2) commits an act of sexual conduct and knows that the victim is unable to understand the nature of the act or is unable to give knowing consent.
  2.  A person commits criminal sexual abuse if that person is under 17 years of age and commits an act of sexual penetration or sexual conduct with a victim who is at least 9 years of age but under 17 years of age.
  3.  A person commits criminal sexual abuse if that person commits an act of sexual penetration or sexual conduct with a victim who is at least 13 years of age but under 17 years of age and the person is less than 5 years older than the victim.

Aggravated Criminal Sexual Abuse (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/11-1.60):

  1. A person commits aggravated criminal sexual abuse if that person commits criminal sexual abuse and any of the following aggravating circumstances exist (i) during the commission of the offense or (ii) for purposes of paragraph (7), as part of the same course of conduct as the commission of the offense: (1) the person displays, threatens to use, or uses a dangerous weapon or any other object fashioned or used in a manner that leads the victim, under the circumstances, reasonably to believe that the object is a dangerous weapon; (2) the person causes bodily harm to the victim; (3) the victim is 60 years of age or older; (4) the victim is a person with a physical disability; (5) the person acts in a manner that threatens or endangers the life of the victim or any other person; (6) the person commits the criminal sexual abuse during the course of committing or attempting to commit any other felony; or (7) the person delivers (by injection, inhalation, ingestion, transfer of possession, or any other means) any controlled substance to the victim for other than medical purposes without the victim's consent or by threat or deception.
  2. A person commits aggravated criminal sexual abuse if that person commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is under 18 years of age and the person is a family member.
  3. A person commits aggravated criminal sexual abuse if: (1) that person is 17 years of age or over and: (i) commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is under 13 years of age; or (ii) commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is at least 13 years of age but under 17 years of age and the person uses force or threat of force to commit the act; or (2) that person is under 17 years of age and: (i) commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is under 9 years of age; or (ii) commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is at least 9 years of age but under 17 years of age and the person uses force or threat of force to commit the act.
  4. A person commits aggravated criminal sexual abuse if that person commits an act of sexual penetration or sexual conduct with a victim who is at least 13 years of age but under 17 years of age and the person is at least 5 years older than the victim.
  5. A person commits aggravated criminal sexual abuse if that person commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is a person with a severe or profound intellectual disability.
  6. A person commits aggravated criminal sexual abuse if that person commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is at least 13 years of age but under 18 years of age and the person is 17 years of age or over and holds a position of trust, authority, or supervision in relation to the victim.

Sexual Relations Within Families (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/11-11): A person commits sexual relations within families if he or she: (1) Commits an act of sexual penetration as defined in Section 11-0.1 of this Code; and (2) The person knows that he or she is related to the other person as follows: (i) Brother or sister, either of the whole blood or the half blood; or (ii) Father or mother, when the child, regardless of legitimacy and regardless of whether the child was of the whole blood or half-blood or was adopted, was 18 years of age or over when the act was committed; or (iii) Stepfather or stepmother, when the stepchild was 18 years of age or over when the act was committed; or (iv) Aunt or uncle, when the niece or nephew was 18 years of age or over when the act was committed; or (v) Great-aunt or great-uncle, when the grand-niece or grand-nephew was 18 years of age or over when the act was committed; or (vi) Grandparent or step-grandparent, when the grandchild or step-grandchild was 18 years of age or over when the act was committed.

Consent (as it relates to sexual activity) (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. §5/11.70)

"Consent" means a freely given agreement to the act of sexual penetration or sexual conduct in question. Lack of verbal or physical resistance or submission by the victim resulting from the use of force or threat of force by the accused shall not constitute consent. The manner of dress of the victim at the time of the offense shall not constitute consent.

A person who initially consents to sexual penetration or sexual conduct is not deemed to have consented to any sexual penetration or sexual conduct that occurs after he or she withdraws consent during the course of that sexual penetration or sexual conduct.

University Definition of Consent

The University uses the following definition of consent in its sexual misconduct policy for the purpose of determining whether sexual violence (including sexual assault) has occurred:

Consent is a mutual, voluntary, and informed agreement to participate in specific sexual acts with another person that is not achieved through unreasonable manipulation or coercion—or any kind of physical force or weapon—and requires having cognitive ability to agree to participate. Consent requires an outward demonstration, through mutually understandable words, conduct or action, indicating that an individual has freely chosen to engage in the specific sexual acts. A verbal “no” constitutes lack of consent, even if it sounds insincere or indecisive. Impairment or incapacitation due to alcohol and/or drug use, permanent/ temporary psychological or physical disability, and being below the age of consent in the applicable jurisdiction are factors which detract from or make consent impossible. (Note: In Illinois, the minimum age of consent for purposes of Statutory Rape is age 17 and no one under 13 years of age is considered capable of consent.) Silence or an absence of resistance does not imply consent, and consent to engage in sexual activity with one person does not imply consent to engage in sexual activity with another. Even in the context of an ongoing relationship, consent must be sought and freely given for each specific sexual act. Consent may be withdrawn at any time. When consent is withdrawn, sexual activity must immediately stop.

Risk Reduction

If you find yourself in an uncomfortable sexual situation, these suggestions may help you reduce your risk:

  • Make your limits known before going too far.
  • You can withdraw consent to sexual activity at any time. Do not be afraid to tell a sexual aggressor “NO” clearly and loudly.
  • Try to remove yourself from the physical presence of a sexual aggressor. Be direct as possible about wanting to leave the environment.
  • Grab someone nearby and ask them for help.
  • Be safe with your alcohol and/or drug use. Alcohol and drugs can lower your sexual inhibitions and may make you vulnerable to someone who views an intoxicated/high person as a sexual opportunity.
  • Attend large parties with friends you trust. Watch out for your friends and ask that they watch out for you.
  • Be aware of someone trying to slip you an incapacitating “rape drug” like Rohypnol or Gamma Hydroxybutyrate (GHB).

If you find yourself in the position of being the initiator of sexual behavior, these suggestions may help you to reduce your risk of being the responding party of sexual assault or another sexual crime:

  • Remember that you owe sexual respect to the other person.
  • Don’t make assumptions about the other person’s consent or about how far they are willing to go.
  • Remember that consent to one form of sexual activity does not necessarily imply consent to another form of sexual behavior.
  • If your partner expresses a withdrawal of consent, stop immediately.
  • Clearly communicate your sexual intentions so that the other person has a chance to clearly tell you their intentions.
  • Consider “mixed messages” a clear sign that the other person is uncomfortable with the situation and may not be ready to progress sexually.
  • Don’t take advantage of someone who is really drunk or on drugs, even if they knowingly and intentionally put themselves in that state. Further, don’t be afraid to step in if you see someone else trying to take advantage of a nearly incapacitated person.
  • Be aware of the signs of incapacitation, such as slurred speech, bloodshot eyes, vomiting, unusual behavior, passing out, staggering, etc.

It is also important to be aware of the warning signs of an abusive person. Some examples include: past abuse; threats of violence or abuse; breaking objects; using force during an argument; jealousy; controlling behavior; quick involvement; unrealistic expectations; isolation; blames others for problems; hypersensitivity; cruelty to animals or children; “playful” use of force during sex; Jekyll-and-Hyde personality.

Bystander Intervention

In addition to reporting incidents to appropriate authorities, below are some ways in which individuals can take safe and positive steps to prevent harm and intervene when there is a risk of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking against another person.

  • Look out for those around you.
  • Realize that it is important to intervene to help others.
  • Treat everyone respectfully. Do not be hostile or an antagonist.
  • Be confident when intervening.
  • Recruit help from others if necessary.
  • Be honest and direct.
  • Keep yourself safe.
  • If things get out of hand, don’t hesitate to contact the police.

Other Information Covered by the PPAP

The PPAP also provides information on possible sanctions and protective measures that may be imposed following a determination that an offense of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking has occurred, an explanation of the disciplinary procedures that will be followed when one of these offenses is alleged, the rights of the parties in such a proceeding, available resources, and other pertinent information. Much of this information is set forth in the upcoming sections of this security report.

Ongoing Prevention and Awareness Campaign

The University also conducts an Ongoing Prevention and Awareness Campaign (OPAC) aimed at all students and employees. This campaign covers the same material as provided in the PPAP, but is intended to increase the understanding of students and employees on these topics and to improve their skills for addressing the offenses of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking.

PPAP and OPAC Programming Methods

The PPAP and OPAC are carried out in a variety of ways, using a range of strategies, and, as appropriate, targeting specific audiences throughout the University. Methods include, but are not limited to: presentations, online training modules, distribution of written materials, periodic email blasts, and guest speakers. A summary of this programming is provided below.

  • New students receive education on the prevention of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking through a presentation by the Office of Student Affairs and the Chicago State University Police Department during orientation. All new employees are required to complete an online training module on these topics upon hire and are required to retake the online training each year.
  • As part of its ongoing campaign, the University uses a variety of strategies, such as in‑person presentations by sexual assault organizations, emails blasts with pertinent information, portal announcements, etc. While programming occurs throughout the year, the University also offers educational sessions and literature in coordination with nationally recognized observances such as Sexual Assault Awareness Month and Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

Consistent with applicable laws, the University prohibits dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. The University's policy used to address complaints of this nature, as well as the procedures for filing, investigating and resolving complaints, may be found at:

The following sections of this report discuss the University's educational programs to promote the awareness of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking; provides information concerning procedures students and employees should follow and the services available in the event they do become a complainant of one of these offenses, and advises students and employees of the disciplinary procedures that will be followed after an allegation that one of these offenses has occurred.

Primary Prevention and Awareness Program

The University conducts an annual Primary Prevention and Awareness Program (PPAP) for all students and employees. The PPAP advises campus community members that the University prohibits the offenses of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking. Additionally, the campus community is informed of the topics discussed below, including relevant definitions, risk reduction, and bystander intervention.

Crime Definitions

Crime Type (Illinois Compiled Statutes)

Definitions

Dating Violence

The institution has determined, based on good-faith research that Illinois law does not define the term dating violence.

Domestic Violence

Illinois' Domestic Violence Act indicates that "domestic violence" means "abuse", which means physical abuse, harassment, intimidation of a dependent, interference with personal liberty or willful deprivation but does not include reasonable direction of a minor child by a parent or person in loco parentis. (750 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 60/103).

In addition, Illinois law includes the following:

  • Domestic Battery (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/12-3.2): A person commits domestic battery if he or she knowingly without legal justification: (1) Causes bodily harm to any family or household member; (2) Makes physical contact of an insulting or provoking nature with any family or household member.
  • Aggravated Domestic Battery (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/12-3.3): (a) A person who, in committing a domestic battery, knowingly causes great bodily harm, or permanent disability or disfigurement commits aggravated domestic battery. (a-5) A person who, in committing a domestic battery, strangles another individual commits aggravated domestic battery. For the purposes of this subsection (a-5), "strangle" means intentionally impeding the normal breathing or circulation of the blood of an individual by applying pressure on the throat or neck of that individual or by blocking the nose or mouth of that individual.
  • For purposes of the above crimes, "family or household members" is defined at 720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/12-0.1 as: "Family or household members" include spouses, former spouses, parents, children, stepchildren, and other persons related by blood or by present or prior marriage, persons who share or formerly shared a common dwelling, persons who have or allegedly have a child in common, persons who share or allegedly share a blood relationship through a child, persons who have or have had a dating or engagement relationship, persons with disabilities and their personal assistants, and caregivers as defined in Section 12-4.4a of this Code. For purposes of this Article, neither a casual acquaintanceship nor ordinary fraternization between 2 individuals in business or social contexts shall be deemed to constitute a dating relationship.

Stalking

Stalking (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/12-7.3):

  • A person commits stalking when he or she knowingly engages in a course of conduct directed at a specific person, and he or she knows or should know that this course of conduct would cause a reasonable person to: (1) fear for his or her safety or the safety of a third person; or (2) suffer other emotional distress.
  • A person commits stalking when he or she, knowingly and without lawful justification, on at least 2 separate occasions follows another person or places the person under surveillance or any combination thereof and: (1) at any time transmits a threat of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement or restraint and the threat is directed towards that person or a family member of that person; or (2) places that person in reasonable apprehension of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement or restraint to or of that person or a family member of that person.
  • A person commits stalking when he or she has previously been convicted of stalking another person and knowingly and without lawful justification on one occasion: (1) follows that same person or places that same person under surveillance; and (2) transmits a threat of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement or restraint to that person or a family member of that person.
  • A person commits stalking when he or she knowingly makes threats that are part of a course of conduct and is aware of the threatening nature of his or her speech.

Aggravated Stalking (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/12-7.4): A person commits aggravated stalking when he or she commits stalking and: (1) causes bodily harm to the victim; (2) confines or restrains the victim; or (3) violates a temporary restraining order, an order of protection, a stalking no contact order, a civil no contact order, or an injunction prohibiting the behavior described in subsection (b)(1) of Section 214 of the Illinois Domestic Violence Act of 1986.

Cyberstalking (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/12-7.5):

  • A person commits cyberstalking when he or she engages in a course of conduct using electronic communication directed at a specific person, and he or she knows or should know that would cause a reasonable person to: (1) fear for his or her safety or the safety of a third person; or (2) suffer other emotional distress.
  • A person commits cyberstalking when he or she, knowingly and without lawful justification, on at least 2 separate occasions, harasses another person through the use of electronic communication and: (1) at any time transmits a threat of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement, or restraint and the threat is directed towards that person or a family member of that person; or (2) places that person or a family member of that person in reasonable apprehension of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement, or restraint; or (3) at any time knowingly solicits the commission of an act by any person which would be a violation of this Code directed towards that person or a family member of that person.
  • A person commits cyberstalking when he or she knowingly, surreptitiously, and without lawful justification, installs or otherwise places electronic monitoring software or spyware on an electronic communication device as a means to harass another person and: (1) at any time transmits a threat of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement, or restraint and the threat is directed towards that person or a family member of that person; (2) places that person or a family member of that person in reasonable apprehension of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement or restraint; or (3) at any time knowingly solicits the commission of an act by any person which would be a violation of this Code directed towards that person or a family member of that person.
  • A person commits cyberstalking when he or she, knowingly and without lawful justification, creates and maintains an Internet website or webpage which is accessible to one or more third parties for a period of at least 24 hours, and which contains statements harassing another person and: (1) which communicates a threat of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement, or restraint, where the threat is directed towards that person or a family member of that person, or (2) which places that person or a family member of that person in reasonable apprehension of immediate or future bodily harm, sexual assault, confinement, or restraint, or (3) which knowingly solicits the commission of an act by any person which would be a violation of this Code directed towards that person or a family member of that person.

Sexual Assault

Criminal Sexual Assault (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/11-1.20): A person commits criminal sexual assault if that person commits an act of sexual penetration and: (1) uses force or threat of force; (2) knows that the victim is unable to understand the nature of the act or is unable to give knowing consent; (3) is a family member of the victim, and the victim is under 18 years of age; or (4) is 17 years of age or over and holds a position of trust, authority, or supervision in relation to the victim, and the victim is at least 13 years of age but under 18 years of age.

Aggravated Criminal Sexual Assault (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/11-1.30):

  1. A person commits aggravated criminal sexual assault if that person commits criminal sexual assault and any of the following aggravating circumstances exist during the commission of the offense or, for purposes of paragraph (7), occur as part of the same course of conduct as the commission of the offense: (1) the person displays, threatens to use, or uses a dangerous weapon, other than a firearm, or any other object fashioned or used in a manner that leads the victim, under the circumstances, reasonably to believe that the object is a dangerous weapon; (2) the person causes bodily harm to the victim, except as provided in paragraph (10); (3) the person acts in a manner that threatens or endangers the life of the victim or any other person; (4) the person commits the criminal sexual assault during the course of committing or attempting to commit any other felony; (5) the victim is 60 years of age or older; (6) the victim is a person with a physical disability; (7) the person delivers (by injection, inhalation, ingestion, transfer of possession, or any other means) any controlled substance to the victim without the victim's consent or by threat or deception for other than medical purposes; (8) the person is armed with a firearm; (9) the person personally discharges a firearm during the commission of the offense; or (10) the person personally discharges a firearm during the commission of the offense, and that discharge proximately causes great bodily harm, permanent disability, permanent disfigurement, or death to another person.
  2. A person commits aggravated criminal sexual assault if that person is under 17 years of age and: (i) commits an act of sexual penetration with a victim who is under 9 years of age; or (ii) commits an act of sexual penetration with a victim who is at least 9 years of age but under 13 years of age and the person uses force or threat of force to commit the act.
  3. A person commits aggravated criminal sexual assault if that person commits an act of sexual penetration with a victim who is a person with a severe or profound intellectual disability.

Predatory Criminal Sexual Assault of a Child (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/11-1.40): A person commits predatory criminal sexual assault of a child if that person is 17 years of age or older, and commits an act of contact, however slight, between the sex organ or anus of one person and the part of the body of another for the purpose of sexual gratification or arousal of the victim or the accused, or an act of sexual penetration, and: (1) the victim is under 13 years of age; or (2) the victim is under 13 years of age and that person: (A) is armed with a firearm; (B) personally discharges a firearm during the commission of the offense; (C) causes great bodily harm to the victim that: (i) results in permanent disability; or (ii) is life threatening; or (D) delivers (by injection, inhalation, ingestion, transfer of possession, or any other means) any controlled substance to the victim without the victim's consent or by threat or deception, for other than medical purposes.

Rape, Fondling, Incest, Statutory Rape

For purposes of the Clery Act, the term "sexual assault" includes the offenses of rape, fondling, incest, and statutory rape. The institution has determined, based on good-faith research, that Illinois law does not define these terms.

Other "sexual assault" crimes

Other crimes under Illinois law that may be classified as a "sexual assault" include the following:

Criminal Sexual Abuse (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/11-1.50):

  1. A person commits criminal sexual abuse if that person: (1) commits an act of sexual conduct by the use of force or threat of force; or (2) commits an act of sexual conduct and knows that the victim is unable to understand the nature of the act or is unable to give knowing consent.
  2. A person commits criminal sexual abuse if that person is under 17 years of age and commits an act of sexual penetration or sexual conduct with a victim who is at least 9 years of age but under 17 years of age.
  3. A person commits criminal sexual abuse if that person commits an act of sexual penetration or sexual conduct with a victim who is at least 13 years of age but under 17 years of age and the person is less than 5 years older than the victim.

 Aggravated Criminal Sexual Abuse (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/11-1.60):

  1. A person commits aggravated criminal sexual abuse if that person commits criminal sexual abuse and any of the following aggravating circumstances exist (i) during the commission of the offense or (ii) for purposes of paragraph (7), as part of the same course of conduct as the commission of the offense: (1) the person displays, threatens to use, or uses a dangerous weapon or any other object fashioned or used in a manner that leads the victim, under the circumstances, reasonably to believe that the object is a dangerous weapon; (2) the person causes bodily harm to the victim; (3) the victim is 60 years of age or older; (4) the victim is a person with a physical disability; (5) the person acts in a manner that threatens or endangers the life of the victim or any other person; (6) the person commits the criminal sexual abuse during the course of committing or attempting to commit any other felony; or (7) the person delivers (by injection, inhalation, ingestion, transfer of possession, or any other means) any controlled substance to the victim for other than medical purposes without the victim's consent or by threat or deception.
  2. A person commits aggravated criminal sexual abuse if that person commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is under 18 years of age and the person is a family member.
  3. A person commits aggravated criminal sexual abuse if: (1) that person is 17 years of age or over and: (i) commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is under 13 years of age; or (ii) commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is at least 13 years of age but under 17 years of age and the person uses force or threat of force to commit the act; or (2) that person is under 17 years of age and: (i) commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is under 9 years of age; or (ii) commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is at least 9 years of age but under 17 years of age and the person uses force or threat of force to commit the act.
  4. A person commits aggravated criminal sexual abuse if that person commits an act of sexual penetration or sexual conduct with a victim who is at least 13 years of age but under 17 years of age and the person is at least 5 years older than the victim.
  5. A person commits aggravated criminal sexual abuse if that person commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is a person with a severe or profound intellectual disability.
  6. A person commits aggravated criminal sexual abuse if that person commits an act of sexual conduct with a victim who is at least 13 years of age but under 18 years of age and the person is 17 years of age or over and holds a position of trust, authority, or supervision in relation to the victim.

Sexual Relations Within Families (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/11-11): A person commits sexual relations within families if he or she: (1) Commits an act of sexual penetration as defined in Section 11-0.1 of this Code; and (2) The person knows that he or she is related to the other person as follows: (i) Brother or sister, either of the whole blood or the half blood; or (ii) Father or mother, when the child, regardless of legitimacy and regardless of whether the child was of the whole blood or half-blood or was adopted, was 18 years of age or over when the act was committed; or (iii) Stepfather or stepmother, when the stepchild was 18 years of age or over when the act was committed; or (iv) Aunt or uncle, when the niece or nephew was 18 years of age or over when the act was committed; or (v) Great-aunt or great-uncle, when the grand-niece or grand-nephew was 18 years of age or over when the act was committed; or (vi) Grandparent or step-grandparent, when the grandchild or step-grandchild was 18 years of age or over when the act was committed.

Consent (as it relates to sexual activity) (720 Ill. Comp. Stat. §5/11.70)

"Consent" means a freely given agreement to the act of sexual penetration or sexual conduct in question. Lack of verbal or physical resistance or submission by the victim resulting from the use of force or threat of force by the accused shall not constitute consent. The manner of dress of the victim at the time of the offense shall not constitute consent.

A person who initially consents to sexual penetration or sexual conduct is not deemed to have consented to any sexual penetration or sexual conduct that occurs after he or she withdraws consent during the course of that sexual penetration or sexual conduct.

University Definition of Consent

 

The University uses the following definition of consent in its sexual misconduct policy for the purpose of determining whether sexual violence (including sexual assault) has occurred:

Consent is a mutual, voluntary, and informed agreement to participate in specific sexual acts with another person that is not achieved through unreasonable manipulation or coercion—or any kind of physical force or weapon—and requires having cognitive ability to agree to participate. Consent requires an outward demonstration, through mutually understandable words, conduct or action, indicating that an individual has freely chosen to engage in the specific sexual acts. A verbal “no” constitutes lack of consent, even if it sounds insincere or indecisive. Impairment or incapacitation due to alcohol and/or drug use, permanent/ temporary psychological or physical disability, and being below the age of consent in the applicable jurisdiction are factors which detract from or make consent impossible. (Note: In Illinois, the minimum age of consent for purposes of Statutory Rape is age 17 and no one under 13 years of age is considered capable of consent.) Silence or an absence of resistance does not imply consent, and consent to engage in sexual activity with one person does not imply consent to engage in sexual activity with another. Even in the context of an ongoing relationship, consent must be sought and freely given for each specific sexual act. Consent may be withdrawn at any time. When consent is withdrawn, sexual activity must immediately stop.

Risk Reduction

If you find yourself in an uncomfortable sexual situation, these suggestions may help you reduce your risk:

  • Make your limits known before going too far.
  • You can withdraw consent to sexual activity at any time. Do not be afraid to tell a sexual aggressor “NO” clearly and loudly.
  • Try to remove yourself from the physical presence of a sexual aggressor. Be direct as possible about wanting to leave the environment.
  • Grab someone nearby and ask them for help.
  • Be safe with your alcohol and/or drug use. Alcohol and drugs can lower your sexual inhibitions and may make you vulnerable to someone who views an intoxicated/high person as a sexual opportunity.
  • Attend large parties with friends you trust. Watch out for your friends and ask that they watch out for you.
  • Be aware of someone trying to slip you an incapacitating “rape drug” like Rohypnol or Gamma Hydroxybutyrate (GHB).

If you find yourself in the position of being the initiator of sexual behavior, these suggestions may help you to reduce your risk of being the responding party of sexual assault or another sexual crime:

  • Remember that you owe sexual respect to the other person.
  • Don’t make assumptions about the other person’s consent or about how far they are willing to go.
  • Remember that consent to one form of sexual activity does not necessarily imply consent to another form of sexual behavior.
  • If your partner expresses a withdrawal of consent, stop immediately.
  • Clearly communicate your sexual intentions so that the other person has a chance to clearly tell you their intentions.
  • Consider “mixed messages” a clear sign that the other person is uncomfortable with the situation and may not be ready to progress sexually.
  • Don’t take advantage of someone who is really drunk or on drugs, even if they knowingly and intentionally put themselves in that state. Further, don’t be afraid to step in if you see someone else trying to take advantage of a nearly incapacitated person.
  • Be aware of the signs of incapacitation, such as slurred speech, bloodshot eyes, vomiting, unusual behavior, passing out, staggering, etc.

It is also important to be aware of the warning signs of an abusive person. Some examples include: past abuse; threats of violence or abuse; breaking objects; using force during an argument; jealousy; controlling behavior; quick involvement; unrealistic expectations; isolation; blames others for problems; hypersensitivity; cruelty to animals or children; “playful” use of force during sex; Jekyll-and-Hyde personality.

Bystander Intervention

In addition to reporting incidents to appropriate authorities, below are some ways in which individuals can take safe and positive steps to prevent harm and intervene when there is a risk of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking against another person.

  • Look out for those around you.
  • Realize that it is important to intervene to help others.
  • Treat everyone respectfully. Do not be hostile or an antagonist.
  • Be confident when intervening.
  • Recruit help from others if necessary.
  • Be honest and direct.
  • Keep yourself safe.
  • If things get out of hand, don’t hesitate to contact the police.

Other Information Covered by the PPAP

The PPAP also provides information on possible sanctions and protective measures that may be imposed following a determination that an offense of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking has occurred, an explanation of the disciplinary procedures that will be followed when one of these offenses is alleged, the rights of the parties in such a proceeding, available resources, and other pertinent information. Much of this information is set forth in the upcoming sections of this security report.

Ongoing Prevention and Awareness Campaign

The University also conducts an Ongoing Prevention and Awareness Campaign (OPAC) aimed at all students and employees. This campaign covers the same material as provided in the PPAP, but is intended to increase the understanding of students and employees on these topics and to improve their skills for addressing the offenses of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking.

PPAP and OPAC Programming Methods

The PPAP and OPAC are carried out in a variety of ways, using a range of strategies, and, as appropriate, targeting specific audiences throughout the University. Methods include, but are not limited to: presentations, online training modules, distribution of written materials, periodic email blasts, and guest speakers. A summary of this programming is provided below.

  • New students receive education on the prevention of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking through a presentation by the Office of Student Affairs and the Chicago State University Police Department during orientation. All new employees are required to complete an online training module on these topics upon hire and are required to retake the online training each year.
  • As part of its ongoing campaign, the University uses a variety of strategies, such as in‑person presentations by sexual assault organizations, emails blasts with pertinent information, portal announcements, etc. While programming occurs throughout the year, the University also offers educational sessions and literature in coordination with nationally recognized observances such as Sexual Assault Awareness Month and Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

Allegations of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking will be processed through the institution’s Sexual Misconduct Policy and the related complaint resolution procedures. The procedures are utilized whenever or wherever a complaint is made, regardless of the status of the complainant and the respondent.

The complaint resolution procedures are invoked once a report is made to the following individuals:

Title IX Coordinator

Jamar Orr

Associate General Counsel & Title IX Coordinator & Judicial Affairs

Office of Legal Affairs

(773) 995-3582

jorr22@csu.edu

An electronic form can also be used to file a report.

A Complainant may file a Formal Complaint with the Title IX Coordinator requesting that the University investigate and adjudicate a report of Sexual Harassment in accordance with the provisions “Investigation” and “Adjudication.” Provided, however, that at the time the Complainant submits a Formal Complaint, the Complainant must be participating in, or attempting to participate in, one or more of the University’s Education Programs or Activities.

A Complainant may file a Formal Complaint with the Title IX Coordinator in person, by regular mail, or by email using the contact information specified in “Reporting Sexual Harassment.” No person may submit a Formal Complaint on the Complainant’s behalf. In any case, including a case where a Complainant elects not to file a Formal Complaint, the Title IX Coordinator may file a Formal Complaint on behalf of the University if doing so is not clearly unreasonable. Such action will normally be taken in limited circumstances involving serious or repeated conduct or where the alleged responding party may pose a continuing threat to the University Community. 

Factors the Title IX Coordinator may consider include (but are not limited to): (a) was a weapon involved in the incident; (b) were multiple assailants involved in the incident; (c) is the Responding Party a repeat offender; and (d) does the incident create a risk of occurring again. If the Complainant or the Title IX Coordinator files a Formal Complaint, then the University will commence an investigation as specified in “Reporting Sexual Harassment” and proceed to adjudicate the matter as specified in “Adjudication.” 

In all cases where a Formal Complaint is filed, the Complainant will be treated as a party, irrespective of the party’s level of participation. In a case where the Title IX Coordinator files a Formal Complaint, the Title IX Coordinator will not act as a Complainant or otherwise as a party for purposes of the investigation and adjudication processes.

To review the full TIX Grievance Procedures, please visit the following link: TitleIX_Policy.pdf  (csu.edu)

During the course of the process described in the previous section, both the complainant and the responding party are entitled to:

  • A prompt, fair and impartial process from the initial investigation to the final result.
    1. A prompt, fair and impartial process is one that is:
    2. Completed within reasonably prompt timeframes designated by the University’s policy, including a process that allows for the extension of timeframes for good cause, with written notice to the complainant and the responding party of the delay and the reason for the delay.
    3. Conducted in a manner that:
      • Is consistent with the University’s policies and transparent to the complainant and the responding party.
      • Includes timely notice of meetings at which the complainant or the responding party, or both, may be present; and
      • Provides timely access to the complainant, the responding party and appropriate officials to any information that will be used during the informal and formal disciplinary meetings and hearings.
    4. Conducted by officials who do not have a conflict of interest or bias for or against the accuser or the accused.
  • Proceedings conducted by officials who, at a minimum, receive annual training on the issues related to dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking and on how to conduct an investigation and hearing process that protects the safety of complainants and promotes accountability.
    1. Such training addresses topics such as relevant evidence and how it should be used during a proceeding, proper techniques for questioning witnesses, basic procedural rules for conducting a proceeding, and avoiding actual and perceived conflicts of interest.  Annual comprehensive TIX training - Summer 2021: Topics included (trauma informed investigations, TIX due process requirements, TIX Proposed Changes, TIX Institutional Policy Review. 
  • The same opportunities to have others present during any institutional disciplinary proceeding, including the opportunity to be accompanied to any related meeting or proceeding by the advisor of their choice. The University may not limit the choice of advisor, but may establish limits regarding the extent to which that advisor may participate in the proceeding, as long as those limits apply equally to both parties.
  • Have the outcome determined using the preponderance of the evidence standard.
  • Simultaneous, written notification of the results of the proceeding, any procedures for either party to appeal the result, any change to the result and when the result becomes final. For this purpose, “result” means “any initial, interim and final decision by an official or entity authorized to resolve disciplinary matters” and must include the rationale for reaching the result and any sanctions imposed.

Possible Sanctions or Protective Measures that the University May Impose for Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault or Stalking Offenses

Following a final determination in the institution’s TIX process that dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking has been committed, the University may impose a sanction depending on the mitigating and aggravating circumstances involved. The possible sanctions include: warning; reprimand; probation; restitution; fine; loss of privileges; housing probation; suspension or expulsion/termination; restriction on eligibility to represent the University at any official function or in any intercollegiate competition. If a suspension is imposed on a student, it may be for part of a semester, a full semester, or an entire academic year. An employee may be suspended for any length of time determined appropriate by the Director of Human Resources. Following a suspension, the individual will be required to meet with the Dean of Students (student) or Director of Human Resources (employee) to discuss re-entry and expectations going forward.

In addition, the University can make available to the complainant a range of protective measures, which will include: forbidding the responding party from entering the complainant’s residence hall and from communicating with the complainant, other institutional no-contact orders, security escorts, modifications to academic requirements or class schedules, changes in working situations, etc.

Publicly Available Recordkeeping

The University will complete any publicly available recordkeeping, including Clery Act reporting and disclosures, without the inclusion of personally identifiable information about complainants of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking who make reports of such to the University to the extent permitted by law.

Parties to Receive Written Notification of Rights

When a student or employee reports to the University that they have been a complainant of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking, whether the offense occurred on or off campus, the University will provide the student or employee a written explanation of their options as described in the paragraphs above.  A party’s rights document will also be provided to the responding party.

Sex Offender Registration Program

The Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act of 2000 requires institutions of higher education to advise members of the campus community where they can obtain information provided by the state concerning registered sex offenders. It also requires sex offenders to notify the state of each institution of higher education in the state at which they are employed or enrolled or carrying on a vocation. The state is then required to notify the University of any such information it receives. Anyone interested in determining whether such persons are on this campus may do so by contacting the State of Illinois Police at State of Illinois Police. State registry of sex offender information may be accessed at the following link:  https://isp.illinois.gov/

In the event of criminal activity occurring either on campus or off campus that in the judgment of the Chicago State University Police Department ((773) 995-2111) constitutes a serious or continuing threat to members of the campus community, a campus-wide “timely warning” will be issued. Examples of such situations may include a sexual assault or a series of motor vehicle thefts in the area that merit a warning because they present a continuing threat to the campus community. Warnings will be communicated to students and employees via one or more of the methods discussed later in this section. Updates to the warnings will be provided as appropriate.


Anyone with information warranting a timely warning should immediately report the circumstances to:

Chicago State University Police Department, (773) 995-2111

The University has communicated with local law enforcement requesting notification of reports or information warranting a timely warning.

Emergency Response

The University has an emergency management plan designed to ensure there is a timely and effective response in the event of a significant emergency or dangerous situation occurring on campus involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of members of the campus community. Such situations include, but are not limited to:  tornadoes, bomb threats, chemical spills, disease outbreaks, fires, active shooters, etc. The University has communicated with local police requesting their cooperation in informing the University about reported situations that may warrant an emergency response.

Students, staff and visitors are encouraged to notify the Chicago State University Police Department of any emergency or potentially dangerous situation.

The Chicago State University President in collaboration with other appropriate personnel, will determine who should be notified, and will, without delay, and taking into account the safety of the community, determine the content of the notification and initiate the notification system, unless issuing a notification will, in the professional judgment of responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist a complainant or to contain respond to or otherwise mitigate the emergency.

Depending on the segments of the campus the notification will target, the content of the notification may differ. When appropriate, the content of the notification will be determined in consultation with local authorities. Also, as appropriate, the notification will give guidance as to whether the recipients should shelter in place or evacuate their location.

Once the emergency is confirmed, and based on its nature, the Chicago State University President or designee will consult with other appropriate University officials to determine the appropriate segment or segments of the University community to be notified.

The Chicago State University President or designee will access available sources of information from campus administrative staff and local authorities to confirm the existence of a dangerous situation or activity and will be responsible for initiating the University's response and for marshaling the appropriate local emergency response authorities for assistance. Depending on the nature of the emergency, other University departments may be involved in the confirmation process.

The Chicago State University President will direct the issuance of emergency notifications, which will be accomplished using one or more of methods discussed later in this section, depending on the nature of the threat and the segment of the campus community being threatened. At the direction of the Chicago State University President or designee the Director of Marketing and Media Relations of the University will notify local law enforcement of the emergency if they are not already aware of it and local media outlets in order that the larger community outside the campus will be aware of the emergency.

Methods for Issuing Timely Warnings and Emergency Notifications

The method(s) listed below may be utilized when the University issues a timely warning or emergency notification to the campus community.

Method

Sign Up Instructions

Emergency Text Message

https://www.csu.edu/dosa/resources/csupolice/Kuvrr.htm

Prominent posting on CSU website

 

Broadcast emails

Public Address Systems throughout the campus

Testing & Documentation

The University tests its emergency response and evacuation procedures at least once a year. The tests may be announced or unannounced. Also, at various times the Emergency Management Team will meet to train and test and evaluate the Chicago State University emergency response plan.

The Chicago State University Chief of Police or designee maintains a record of these tests and training exercises, including a description, the dates and times the test were conducted and an indication as to whether the test was announced or unannounced. In connection with at least one such test, the University will distribute to its students and employees information as a reminder of the Chicago State University emergency response and evacuation procedures.

If a member of the University community has reason to believe that a student who resides in on-campus housing is missing, that information should be reported immediately to the Director of Residence Life at (773) 995-4543 or the Dean of Student Affairs at (773) 995-4510. Any University employee receiving a missing student report should immediately notify the Chicago State University Police Department (773) 995-2111 for initiation of an investigation.

Students residing in on-campus housing have the option to identify confidentially an individual to be contacted by the University only in the event the student is determined to be missing for more than 24 hours. If a student has identified such an individual, the University will notify that individual no later than 24 hours after the student is determined to be missing. The option to identify a contact person in the event the student is determined missing is in addition to identifying a general emergency contact person, however that can be the same individual for both purposes. The confidential contact information of the student will be accessible only by authorized campus officials, and it will only be disclosed to law enforcement personnel in furtherance of a missing student investigation.

A student who wishes to designate a confidential contact may do so by calling (773) 821-2882 or via email at csupolice@csu.edu.

After investigating a missing person report, if it is determined that the student has been missing for 24 hours, the Chicago State University Police Department will notify local police authorities unless it was local law enforcement that made the determination that the student is missing. If the missing student is under the age of 18 and is not emancipated, the Student Affairs and Judicial Affairs Departments will also notify the custodial parent(s) or legal guardian(s) of the student within 24 hours of the determination that the student is missing, in addition to notifying any additional contact person designated by the student.

The statistical summary of crimes for this University over the past three calendar years follows:

 

On Campus

On Campus Housing

Non Campus

Public Property

Crime

2021

2020

2019

2021

2020

2019

2021

2020

2019

2021

2020

2019

Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Manslaughter by Negligence

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Rape

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Fondling

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Statutory Rape

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Incest

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Aggravated Assault

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Burglary

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

Robbery

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

Motor Vehicle Theft

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

Arson

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Arrest - Liquor Law Violation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Arrest - Drug Abuse Violation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Arrest - Weapon Violation

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Disciplinary Referral - Liquor Law Violation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Disciplinary Referral - Drug Abuse Violation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Disciplinary Referral - Weapon Violation

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Domestic Violence

0

0

1

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

Dating Violence

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Stalking

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Hate crimes:

2021: No hate crimes reported.
2020: No hate crimes reported.
2019: No hate crimes reported.

Crimes unfounded by the University

2021: 0 unfounded crimes.
2020: 1 unfounded crimes.
2019: 2 unfounded crimes.

 Statistics for unfounded crimes provided by law enforcement agencies

Housing Facilities and Fire Safety Systems

The University maintains on-campus housing for its students. Below is a description of fire safety systems and the number of fire drills conducted during the previous calendar year.

Campus: Chicago State University, 9501 South King Drive, Chicago, IL 60628

Facility

Fire Alarm Monitoring Done on Site

Partial Sprinkler System

Full Sprinkler System

Smoke Detection

Fire Extinguisher Devices

Evacuation Plans & Placards

Number of evacuation (fire) drills in previous calendar year

Residents Hall, 9501 S. King Dr.

X

 

X

X

X

X

2

Policies on Portable Appliances, Smoking and Open Flames

The use of open flames, such as candles, the burning of such things as incense, and smoking are prohibited in campus housing. Only surge-protected extension cords are permitted. Only the following portable cooking or food storage appliances are permitted to be used in campus housing: microwaves and refrigerators. Also, tampering with fire safety systems is prohibited and any such tampering may lead to appropriate disciplinary action.

The University reserves the right to make periodic inspections of campus housing to ensure fire safety systems are operational and that there is compliance with the policy on prohibited items. Prohibited items, if found, will be confiscated and donated or discarded without reimbursement.

Fire Evacuation Procedures

In the event of a fire, the University expects that all campus community members will evacuate by the nearest exit, closing doors and activating the fire alarm system (if one is nearby) as they leave. If circumstances permit at the time of the alarm, additional instructions will be given regarding where students and/or staff are to relocate.

Fire Education and Training Programs

Fire safety education programs for all residents of on-campus student housing and all employees with responsibilities related to that housing are held at the beginning of each semester. The purpose of these education programs is to familiarize everyone with the fire safety system in each facility; train on procedures to follow if there is a fire; and inform the campus community of the University fire safety policies. Information distributed includes evacuation route maps of each facility, which includes any fire alarms and fire suppression equipment available in the facility. Attendees are advised of the mandatory participation in fire drills.  Any student with a disability is given the option of having a “buddy” assigned to assist him or her.

Reporting Fires

The University is required to disclose each year statistical data on all fires that occurred in on-campus student housing. When a fire alarm is pulled and/or the fire department responds to a fire, these incidents are captured. If you encounter a fire that presents an emergency situation, ensure your own safety and then please call 911.

There may also be instances when a fire is extinguished quickly and an alarm is not pulled or a response by the fire department was not necessary. It is important that these incidents be recorded as well. Therefore, if you are aware of such a fire, see evidence of one or hear about one, you should contact the Vice President Administrative Services, Michael Holmes, (773) 995-2278. When providing notification of a fire, give as much information as possible about the location, date, time and cause of the fire.

Plans for Future Improvements

As a result of the University's most recent review of its fire safety protections and procedures, we have determined that the following improvements will be made, subject to the availability of funding: 

Plans continue to replacement of all building fire alarms through a state funded project.

Fire Statistics

Chicago State University

2021
No fires were reported in 2021.

2020
No fires were reported in 2020.

2019
No fires were reported in 2019.