Student Activities

activities groupWelcome students, faculty & staff. We host an array of cultural, educational, philanthropic, social and student leadership development events and programs. Annually we are responsible for:

  • Black History Month
  • Graduation celebrations
  • Homecoming Week
  • Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. celebration
  • Spirit Day
  • Welcome Week events
  • Women's History Month, and Spring Fling Week.

Here in Student Activities, we believe your commitment to academic excellence and involvement on campus significantly enhances your overall learning experience while at CSU. Getting involved on campus helps fuel a healthy and vibrant social life and develops and sharpens the critical skills you'll need to be successful in the career path you've chosen.

Cordell Reed Student Union (CRSU) - Suite 260

(773) 995-2300 phone

(773) 995-4489 fax

Mon to Fri  9am to 9pm

Dept Title Name Email
Student Activities & Leadership Director Antwone Cameron

acamer23@csu.edu

African American Male Resource Center Assistant Director Aremu Mbdande

aremu.mbande@csu.edu 

Latino Resource Center Assistant Director Kendy Olaguez kolaguez@csu.edu
Fraternity/Sorority Life   Antwone Cameron acamer23@csu.edu
Student Activities (SA) at Chicago State University dates as far back as the founding of the school in 1867 (when it was named Cook County Normal School). During this time Student Council coordinated all student activities, student handbooks and student organizations. The actual Office of Student Activities was created around 1967 when the institution was revamped and renamed Chicago State College. Throughout the 1960s, Chicago State not only became Chicago State University, but it expanded its Office of Student Activities to foster the growing need for educational, cultural, social and recreational programming for students. At the old location on 68th and Stewart, SA housed TEMPO Newspaper, Clubs and Organizations, Honors Societies, Photography, Yearbook, and hosted Homecoming, and Service Projects. Today, the Office of Student Activities is located in the Cordell Reed Student Union Suite 260 and is the home of over 60 clubs and organizations including Student Government Association and Fraternity/ Sorority Life, and Royal Court. SA also hosts robust programming, which includes but is not limited to: “We Live It Series,” “Welcome Week,” “Homecoming,” “Thanksgiving Throwdown Step Show”, “Black History Month,” "Latino Heritage Month", “Women’s History Month, and ”CSU Women Rock.” SA has a computer lab, study area and lounge where students and staff are able to eat and socialize, as well as a Movie Room and Game Room. Student Activities offers a friendly atmosphere where students can come and relax and have their needs and concerns addressed.
The mission of the Office of Student Activities is to encourage and aid in the development of social, cultural, intellectual and governance programs that expands the involvement of students with the campus community and society. We assure that we are creating an extraordinary student experience, developing student leaders and creating learning beyond the classroom that is aligned with the values and mission of Chicago State University.

These matters should be reviewed weekly and discussed in team meetings. Any changes that are implemented as a result of student feedback would be published monthly (or quarterly) on this page so students can see how DOSA is working to respond to their concerns. Operational Idea: SGA could provide the first level of review to filter comments and suggestions and submit the weekly report to Dean with recommendations for solutions. This increases collaborative engagement.

 

Social Change Model of Leadership Development

Approaches leadership as a purposeful, collaborative, values-based process that results in positive social change.

change

The Social Change Model was built upon the following assumptions:

  • Leadership is concerned with effecting change on behalf of others and society.
  • Leadership is collaborative.
  • Leadership is a process rather than a position.
  • Leadership should be value-based.
  • All students (not just those that hold formal leadership positions) are potential leaders.
  • Service is a powerful vehicle for developing students’ leadership skills.

Source: Higher Education Research Institute. (1996). A social change model of leadership development (Version III). Los Angeles: University of California Los Angeles Higher Education Research Institute.