Chicago State University
773.995.2000

Psychology

Department Chairperson: Ivy Dunn

Faculty: Grace Buchanan, Margaret Dust, Victor Etta, Elizabeth Arnott-Hill, EstherJ. Jenkins, Alesia Richardson

The Department of Psychology offers a Bachelor of Arts degree for students interested in the scientific study of behavior. Psychology is composed of many subareas. The curriculum and courses offered in the department reflect this diversity and are designed to provide a well-rounded education in Psychology.

Graduates of the program are prepared for advanced study in psychology and related disciplines and for employment in professional entry level positions. Students with a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology work in community agencies, social service agencies, hospital settings, and business.

General Requirements

Admission to the program is contingent upon good academic standing and acceptance by the department. The department will not accept D transfer credit in the major. Achievement of a grade of C or better is required in all psychology courses applied toward the major. Completion of 120 semester hours of work: 6 hours in composition; 6 hours in a single foreign language; 33 hours in general education (refer to liberal arts curriculum outline) consisting of 12 hours in humanities, 9 hours in physical and life sciences; 3 hours in mathematics; 3 hours of critical thinking; 3 hours of diversity courses; and 3 hours of interdisciplinary courses;40 hours in psychology; 35 hours in electives selected with the psychology departmental advisor’s approval; and passing the examination on the state and federal constitutions. Assessment in the major must be completed before graduation, generally in the senior year. Students must complete the university qualifying examinations in English, reading, and mathematics before enrolling in most 300-level course. Please refer to specific course descriptions.

Specific Requirements

Psychology Core (28 credit hours)

PSYC 1100/141, 2040/204, 2080/231, 2100/263, 3100/325, 4100/341, 4150/318, 4155/336, and 4185/331.

Elective Psychology Courses (12 credit hours)

12 credit hours of electives in psychology selected with the approval of the departmental academic advisor. It is recommended that two courses are selected from one of the following concentrations: Developmental, Research Methods, Mental Health Psychology and Counseling, Psychology of Diverse Populations, and Cognitive Psychology. Refer to the department brochure for details.

Note: Psychology majors may not elect to take 3020/308, or 3040/309.

Honors Option in Psychology

Admission requirements for Honors in Psychology-In order to apply a student must:

  • Have a 3.25 GPA or higher in the major (after 12 credit hours);
  • Have a 3.0 GPA or higher overall;
  • Have a junior level status;
  • Identify a faculty member that will serve as a program mentor (both in assessing student progress at the end of each semester and the completion of the honors project/thesis.
  • Complete an application for admittance that is signed by the faculty mentor and approved by the department chair;
  • Present their honor thesis/project in a special poster session.

Program Requirements-Honors students must:

  • Complete two designated honors classes at the 3000-4000 level (6 credit hours);
  • Complete a two-semester honors thesis project with a faculty mentor (6 credit hours);
  • Earn a B or above in each honors course;
  • Maintain a major GPA of 3.25 or higher;
  • Complete program requirements over 3-4 semesters.

Honors Courses: Honors sections will require a level of intellectual engagement over and above that of the traditional course. Honors sections will require additional reading and one or more additional projects.

Honors Thesis/Project Requirements-In order to complete the honors thesis/project requirement, a student must:

  • Enroll with a faculty mentor for two semesters (6 credit hours) in a section of Honors Special Projects;
  • Develop a project/thesis (in conjunction with the faculty mentor) that contributes intellectually to the field of psychology. Appropriate types of projects include written literature reviews (of the type suitable for publication) or empirical research projects;
  • Defend the honors thesis project before a committee consisting of the faculty mentor and 1-2 additional faculty readers;
  • Submit an APA-style manuscript describing the project/thesis to the department.

Minor in Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Counselor Training (21 credit hours)

The requirements for minors must be completed prior to graduation in order for the minor to appear on the transcript. For more information about minors, see the chairperson of the department.

Required Courses (21 credit hours)

4200/311, 4201/312, 4202/313, 4203/314,

4204/316, 4205/363, 4206/370.

Minor in Psychology: 18 credit hours

Required Courses (9 credit hours)

PSYC 1010/141, 2080/231, 2000/217. or 2040/204

Elective Courses (9 credit hours)

Select 9 credit hours at the 3000 level with the approval of the departmental academic advisor. A grade of C or better is required for all psychology courses applied toward the minor.

Psychology (PSYC) Course Offerings

1000/123 PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT (3)

Psychological topics applied to personal, academic and career growth. Selected readings pertaining to issues of personal identity incorporated into a laboratory learning experience. (Does not fulfill major requirements.)

1050 FRESHMAN SEMINAR: PSYCHOLOGY (1)

Introduction to the expectations of the university. Hands-on activities that promote effective study skills. Identify and explore campus resources. Career development, coping strategies, as well as helpful communication skills to assist in acclimatization to college. For Psychology majors with freshman standing. This course is pass/fail.

1100/141 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (3)

The scientific method, fundamental principles of sensory and thought processes, biological bases of behaviors, learning and language development, human development, mental health, exceptionality, emotion and motivation, personality and group processes. (Enrichment core course.) IAI: S6 900 SPE 912 Note: PSYC 1100//141 is a prerequisite for all undergraduate psychology courses.

2000/217 LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENT (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141.

The study of physical, mental, psychosocial development and health considerations throughout the life span. IAI: S6 902, SED 903.

2020/206 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Prerequisite: Education majors and teaching candidates only; PSYC 1100.

Nature and measurement of the learning process in elementary and high schools. Students are required to complete 10 clock hours of observation in the schools. Requires TB test and criminal background check.  Credit will not be given for more than one of the following: Psychology 2020/206, 210 and 218. 

2040/204 PSYCHOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100//141.

Cognitive, affective, psychomotor and social development including the ages in preschool, middle school, and adolescence. Social and cultural influences on development. Identification of exceptional individuals, including the learning disabled. IAI: S6 904

2060/228 COMMUNITY SERVICE LEARNING IN PSYCHOLOGY /2 (3-6)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141 and consent of instructor. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

Implementation of self-help techniques, prevention, and intervention programs with underserved populations. Requires journaling, observation and writing assignments in addition to field placement. May be taken for six hours in one semester and may be repeated for a total of nine hours.

2080/231 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141 and MATH 0990/099 Level 1 or consent of the department.

Descriptive statistics: central tendency and variability. Correlation and regression.

2100/263 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141.

A survey of basic theories and research on how we think about, influence, and relate to others. Topics include: person perception, attitudes, interpersonal attraction, social influence, prejudice, aggression, and helping. Writing emphasis course. IAI: S8 900 PSY 908

2120/303 PSYCHOLOGY OF STRESS AND ITS MANAGEMENT (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141.

A critical analysis of the psychological aspects of stress. Theory, diagnosis and management of stress related disturbances.

2140/310 PSYCHOLOGY OF DEATH AND DYING (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141.

Historical and modern perspectives on death, euthanasia and suicide, life after death, funereal options, dying, loss and the role of survivors and children’s grief.

2160/321 PSYCHOLOGY OF MASS MEDIA. (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

Expertise in appropriate research methods courses and consent of the instructor.

Collection and analysis of data on media preferences and/or program content. Writing of results in publishable form. May be taken up to three times if different media or different aspects of same medium are examined. Field work required.

2200/367 PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 100/141.

Examination of gender stereotypes: social roles, development, sexuality, power, and achievement in males and females. Survey of current gender-based research and theory.

2250 PSYCHOLOGICAL PROBLEMS RELATED TO AFRICAN AMERICANS (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

Identification of psychological problems of contemporary African Americans. Related social, economic, and historical factors will be emphasized. Psychological principles applied to understanding and treatment of problems. (This course satisfies the elective course requirements for the African American Studies major or minor.)

2300 CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Prerequisites: PSYC 1100/141.

The psychological importance of cultural differences. Ways in which human perceiving, thinking, feeling, striving, and relating to others are conditioned by cultural membership. Contributions of work in cross-cultural psychology in the areas of education, training, cultural awareness, definition, and assessment of intelligence, psychopathology and other human characteristics.

2400 INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141

Introduction to the field of forensic psychology. Discussion of he field’s history as well as the various types of evaluations that are performed by forensic psychologists. Exploration of expert testimony of forensic psychologists in addition to the ethical issues involved in the practice of forensic psychology.

2500 RELIGIOUS AND SPIRITUAL ISSUES IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Prerequisites: PSYC 1100/141

Explores the relationship between psychological theory and religious beliefs and spiritual values. Students apply these foundations to counseling situations involving addictions, grief, and violence. Families, singles, youth, and prison populations are addressed. Requires 16 hours of volunteer work and internet access.

3020/308 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADOLESCENCE (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

Physical, intellectual, emotional, and social factors in adolescent development. IAI: PSY 902

3040/309 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADULTHOOD AND AGING (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141 and 2040/204, 3020/308, or equivalent.

Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations. Physical, intellectual, emotional and social factors in adult development and aging. IAI: S6 905

3060/315 CRISIS COUNSELING (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

This course will examine crisis theories and application in normal development crisis, situational crisis, and existential crisis. Skill building models of crisis counseling for all crisis categories will be developed and applied.

3070/319 HELPING SKILLS (3)

Prerequisites: PSYC 100/141.

Competencies for para-professionals in the helping professions. Interpersonal communication skills and problem solving.

Group participation skills and helping processes. For entry level positions in psychology, social service, and other health related fields.

3080/322 HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141

Current theoretical systems in psychology and their historical antecedents. Seminar.

3100/325 COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141; Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

Nine credit hours in psychology.

Reviews current thinking on topics such as conditioning, attention, learning, memory, thinking, language, and cognitive development. Surveys the work of African American and Latino psychologists. Also includes using APA style to write a literature review on relevant topics.

3120/332 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

Introduces the physical bases of mental functioning. Also includes using transparencies or Power Point to give oral presentations on relevant topics.

3140/335 PERCEPTION AND COGNITION (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

Follows the visual and auditory streams through the peripheral and central nervous systems. Examines cognitive models of perception. Also includes automated bibliographic searching and writing a reference list in APA style. Additional course fee.

3160/338 INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

Psychological methods in the analysis of human factors in business and industry. IAI: PSY 906

3180/345 ADVANCED SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141, 2040/204, 4150/318; 12 hours in psychology and senior status. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

Seminar focusing on a specific topic in psychology. The exact topic will vary from semester to semester. Requirements will include a paper of publishable quality and use of primary sources. Enrollment limited to 20 students. May be repeated once with a different topic.

3220/352 ADVANCED ISSUES IN AFRICAN AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141 and 3200/351. Successful completion of qualifying exam in English, Reading, and mathematics.

A continuation of PSYC 3200/351 with emphasis on the family and interpersonal relationships. Evaluated within an Afrocentric social context. (This course satisfies the elective course requirements for the African American Studies major or minor.)

3240/353 PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF AFRICAN AMERICANS (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141.

Psychological testing of African Americans; history and past implications; present status; implications for test construction and teaching at the elementary and secondary levels.

3260/364 PSYCHOLOGY OF CHILD ABUSE (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141 or consent of the department. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

History and legal aspects of child abuse and corporal punishment in the United States. Effects of physical abuse on children’s development. Psychosocial characteristics of child abusers. Organizations in the United States that deal with child abuse.

3280/365 PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN SEXUALITY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

A study of the psychosexual development of individuals living in a modern technological society. Topics include the biological-sociological-psychological aspects of learning, masculinity, femininity, sexual counseling, love, intimacy, marriage, divorce, roles, and gender.

3300/366 THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PARENTING (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

An examination of current theories of childbearing, and implications for parent behavior. Methods of facilitating good parenting. A critical examination of current “how to parent” child care manuals. Role of the one-parent family in the development of the child’s personality.

3320/369 FAMILY AND COMMUNITY VIOLENCE (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

The course examines violence in the family and community with an emphasis on racial and ethnic differences. The course provides an overview of the incidence and prevalence, theories of causation, risk factors, long term effects, prevention/treatment for child abuse/neglect, spousal abuse and youth violence. 

4000/330 SPECIAL PROJECTS IN PSYCHOLOGY (1-6)

Prerequisite: Psychology Majors only. PSYC 1100/141 and consent of the department.

Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations. Independent and/or group studies relating to students’ special interests or programs. Hours are to be arranged, with a maximum of three credit hours per semester.  May be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours. 

4100/341 EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY LECTURE AND LABORATORY/4 (4)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141, 2080/231 and/or co-requisite 4185/331. Psychology Majors only. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

The design, conduct, and interpretation of experiments in psychology. Experience in laboratory procedures and statistical analysis. Writing emphasis course.

4120/343 BEHAVIORAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141, PSYC 2080/231 and PSYC 4185/331 or consent of the department. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

Survey of non-experimental behavioral research methodology. Students will design research, and collect and analyze data in various areas of psychology.

4140/346 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING AND MEASUREMENT (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141 and 2080/231 or equivalent. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

Theories of measurement. Validity, reliability, item construction and item validation in intelligence, personality, interest, attitude, and aptitude tests.

4150/318 PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

Course examines the major theories of personality and provides an integrative framework for understanding the dynamics of personality. IAI: PSY 907

4155/336 ABNORMAL SYCHOLOGY(3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

The course examines a scientific theories, concepts, definitions, research and applications in psycho pathology. Includes the identification, classification, diagnosis and therapeutic models of major psychological disorders. The course introduces the underlying diagnostic and treatment methodologies in the DSM-IV. IAI: PSY 905

4160/350 INTERNSHIP IN PSYCHOLOGY (3-6)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141, completion of 9 credit hours in psychology, declaration of major in psychology, second semester junior standing (minimum of 75 credit hours), consent of instructor, and successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations. Requires department approval one semester in advance of registration.

Supervised undergraduate internship with opportunities for participation in a cognitive, physiological, forensic, or social service setting. Includes writing a final paper in APA format. (May be taken in a two semester sequence for a maximum of 6 credit hours).

4170 INTERNSHIP IN SPIRITUAL PSYCHOLOGY/100 (3)

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Spirituality in Psychology Program, PSYC 1100, completion of 9 credit hours in psychology, or consent of department.

Supervised Internship that provides experiences in spiritual counseling. Students are placed in a religious institution or other organization that provides counseling from a spiritual perspective. May be taken in a two-semester sequence for a maximum of six semester hours.

4180/358 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 2080/231 or PSYC 4190/357 or MATH 1600/210 and

PSYC 4185/331 or consent of the department. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

Design computer spreadsheets and data base files for statistical analysis in research. Become proficient in SPSS, EXEL, Internet, and other applications used in the behavioral sciences.

4185/331 STATISTICAL METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141 and 2080/231 or equivalent. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

Inferential statistics: point estimates, confidence intervals, one-sample z and t tests, two-sample z and t tests, analysis of variance.

4190/357 FUNDAMENTALS OF STATISTICAL METHODS (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141 and MATH 099 Level 1 or consent of the department. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

Descriptive statistics through correlation and regression. Inferential statistics: point estimates, confidence intervals, one-sample z and t tests of significance, correlation and regression.

4200/311 PHARMACOLOGY FOR ADDICTION (3)

Prerequisites: PSYC 1100/141, 4155/336

Classification of alcohol and other drug’s physical and psychological effects, medical complications, assessment and diagnostic techniques, treatment settings, and modalities.

4201/312 ETHICS AND ADDICTIONS (3)

Prerequisites: PSYC 1100/141, 2040/204 or 2000/217, 4155/336. Successful completion of English, reading, math and reading qualifying examinations.

Prepares students to develop ethical standards and apply them in alcohol and drug dependency counseling.

4202/313 CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY COUNSELING (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141, 4155/336, 4205/363.

Theory and practice of counseling addictions. Individual, family, group approaches. Screening, intake, treatment delivery models.

4203/314 COMMUNITY AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE/ADDICTIONS (3)

Prerequisites: PSYC 1100/141, 2040/204, 2000/217

Influence of drugs and alcohol on family, community violence. Incidence, prevalence, theories, causation, risk factors, long term effects. Prevention strategies.

4204/316 ALCOHOL / DRUG ADDICTION INTERNSHIP (3-6)

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the AODA Program, PSYC 1100/141, 4202/313, 4206/370.  Requires departmental approval of internship site.

Focuses on demonstrating competency in the 12 core functions and 8 practice dimensions of substance use disorder counseling. Supervised field experience using knowledge and practicing skills learned in the classroom.

4205/363 PSYCHOLOGY OF DRUG ADDICTION (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141. Successful completion of the English, reading, and mathematics qualifying examinations.

Introductory course in the chemical, psychological, social and treatment aspects of drug use, abuse, and dependency. Drug abuse Drug abuse prevention will be introduced through elementary theories of open communication.

4206/370 ADDICTION ASSESSMENT/CASE MANAGEMENT (3)

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the AODA Program, PSYC 1100/141, 4155/336, 4205/363.   Requires departmental approval.

Introduction to and training in basic intake, assessment, diagnosis, treatment planning, referral, insurance, and other aspects of effective case management.

4207 GROUP WORK IN ADDITICTIONS COUNSELING (3)

Prerequisites: PSYC 1100, 4205/5205.

Overview of group counseling with substance abusers in a variety of rehabilitation programs. Experiential group counseling focus. Participation in a counseling group with a personal growth focus followed by a period of didactic processing.

4210/377 ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY FOR MIDDLE GRADE TEACHERS (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141

Explores the development issues of early adolescence as they pertain to middle school education. Explores the advisory role of middle school teachers in assessing, coordinating, and referring students to health and social service agencies.