Department of Health Studies

Department Chairperson: Patrick B. Williams

Faculty :William Ebomoyi, Karen Hardney, Thomas Britt, Daniel Dodor, Emmanuel Osunkoya, Ivonne Anguh, and Thomas Lyons

The Department of Health Studies offers four-year Bachelor of Science degree programs in Community Health and Pre-Physical Therapy. The mission of the department is consistent with the university’s mission to recruit and graduate culturally and economically diverse health care professionals.

The department also aims to produce graduates who are responsible, service oriented, discerning and informed global citizens.

The Bachelor of Science degree programs draw heavily from a sound knowledge of liberal arts, the medical sciences, communications, health education, and psychology. The curriculum is a model of interdisciplinary education because it entails courses from various departments within and outside of the College of Health Sciences. The curriculum permits the close interaction of students enrolled in other health sciences disciplines (pre-occupational therapy, nursing, and health information administration), thereby enhancing the students’ ability to function together as members of a health team.

B.S. Degree in Community Health

Graduates of the community health program are educated to enter the job market as health educators, fitness consultants, consumer information directors, and community outreach coordinators who are trained to promote healthy lifestyles through behavior modification, physical activity and proper nutrition to prevent diseases such as obesity, high blood pressure, cancer, domestic violence, HIV, substance abuse or heart disease.

To curtail the high cost of health care, policy makers are increasingly employing the preventive approaches and services of community educators in county, state and federal health departments, wellness programs, hospitals, disease management, and consulting firms, consumer advocacy and international organizations and voluntary health care organizations.

Admission Process and Graduation Requirements

The community health program admits freshmen and transfer students. Applications are accepted and reviewed throughout the year. Students must complete the general university admission requirements and successfully complete the required university examinations in English, mathematics, and reading, in addition to federal and state constitution examinations. 

All students admitted to the community health program must successfully complete 121-122 credit hours of course work which consists of 55-56 credits of general education courses; 12 credits of health sciences core courses; 43 credits of community health core courses and 9 hours of community health supportive electives. A minimum grade point average of 2.25 is required to remain in the program. Students must earn a grade of C or better in all courses. Any course with a grade of D must be repeated.

General Education and Required Supportive Courses

English Composition (6 credits)

ENG 1270/ 127, ENG 1280/ 128.

Math/Critical Thinking/Computer Science (9 credits)

MATH 1200/ 162, PHIL 1030/ 221 or College Level Math, CPTR 1060/ 106.

Humanities (12 credits)

Six hours in a single foreign language,

CMAT 1130/ 113, 2030/ 203, or 2210/ 221; CMAT 2460/ 246.

Natural Sciences (13-14 credits)

PHS 1000/ 100, 1010/ 101, 1100/ 110; PHYS 1510/ 151; BIOL 1710/ 171 or 2059/ 259, ZOOL 2610/ 261; ZOOL 2040/ 204 or BIOL 1080/ 108; BIOL 3050/ 250 or BOT 2050/205; *CHEM 1050/ 105 or 1550/ 155; *BIOL 2020/ 220 and 2021/ 221 (A & P I and II); or ZOOL 2050/ 250 and PSLY 2040/ 204.

Social Sciences (12 Credits)

ANTH 1010/ 101 or SOC 1010/ 101; PSYC 1100/ 141*; PSYC 2000/ 217 or 2040/ 204; PSYC 4155/ 336, PSYC 2080/ 231 or 4190/ 357 or MATH 1600/ 210

Electives (6 credits)

Required Health Science Core Courses (12 Credits)

H SC 1104/ 104, H SC 1150/ 150, H SC 2250/ 250, H SC 3375.

Required Community Health Core Courses (43 Credits)

H SC 2190/ 190, H SC 2220/ 220/PE, HS 1103/ 103, H SC 3320 (Substitute + HIA 4200/ 309, NURS 3200/ 368 or PSYC 4120/ 343), H SC 3317/ 317 (Substitute + NURS 2100/ 295), H SC 3315/ 315, H SC 4414, H SC 4418, HSC 4423, H SC 3313/ 313, H SC 3316/ 316 (Substitute + NURS 2200/ 274, HIA 3300/ 209 or 3700/ 213, OT 4160/ 363 or 4161/ 364), H SC 4424, HSC 3319/ 319, H SC 4425, HSC 3321

Community Health Supportive Electives (9 Credits)

PE1700/ 170, PE 3340/ 334, H SC 3310/ 310, PSYC 4205/ 263, PSYC 3060/ 315, PSYC 4206/ 370, PSYC 3300/ 366, PSYC 2140/ 310, H SC 3328/ 328, PSYC 4205/ 363, PSYC 3320/ 369, H SC 2265/ 265, H SC 3326/ 326, HSC 3327/ 327, HS 4600/ 360, H SC 2210/ 210

* Required Course

** H SC courses cannot substitute for professional courses in nursing (NURS), occupational therapy (OT) and health information administration (HIA).

+ Other professional courses (such as HIA, OT, PT or NURS codes) completed with a grade of C or better will be accepted as a health promotion supportive elective with the approval of the Dean. Credits will not be awarded for both HSC and the professional courses in HIA, nursing and OT.

Curriculum Pattern for the BS in Community Health.

Fall 1st Year

 

Spring 1st Year

 

ENG 1270

3

ENG 1280

3

PSYC 1100*

3

MATH 1200

3

ANTH 1010 or SOC 1010

3

HSC 2220/PE

3

For. Lang.

3

HSC 2215 or CPTR 1060

3

CMAT 1130 or 2030 or 2210

3

For. Lang.

3

 

15

 

15

 

Fall 2nd Year

 

Spring 2nd Year

 

CHEM 1050

5

BIOL 2020* or ZOOL 2050*

4

HSC 1104

3

HSC 2250

3

HSC 1150

3

HSC 2190

3

BIOL 1080

3

Fine Arts

3

HS 1103

1

CMAT 2460

3

 

15

 

16

 

Fall 3rd Year

 

Spring 3rd Year

 

PSLY 2040 or BIOL 2021

4

HSC 3315

3

HSC 3313

3

HSC 3316

3

HSC 3319

3

HSC 3200

3

HSC 3329

3

HSC 3317

3

HSC 3313

3

HSC Elective

3

 

15

 

16

 

Fall 4th Year

 

Spring 4th Year

 

HSC 4418

3

HSC 4423

3

HSC 4414

3

HSC 4425

3

HSC 3375

3

HSC Electives

6

HSC 4425

3

HSC 4424

3

HSC Elective

3

  
 

15

 

15

Total Credits Required: 122

*Required Sciences Courses

Minor in Health Sciences (20 credit hours)

The College of Health Sciences offers a minor in health sciences to students who may wish to pursue a career in the health field. Any student enrolled at Chicago State University with a defined major field of study may elect to obtain a minor in health sciences to enhance their education and employment prospects.

The minor in health sciences requires three core courses, which include the recently introduced service learning course (HSC 3321); and 12 hours of electives. The minor must be completed before graduation and student must attain a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or better. A grade of C or better is required in all courses accepted towards the minor.

Required Courses (8 credit hours)

H SC 1104/104, 1150/150 and 3321/321

Elective Courses (12 credit hours)

Selected 12 hours from the following: H SC

2190/190, 2210/210, 2215/215, 2220/220, 2250/250, 2255/255, 2265/265, 2299/299, 3311/311, 3312/312, 3320/320, 2375/375; HIA 3010/201; OT 2010/201; PT 3301/301.

Equivalent courses from other institutions will be considered. The Dean of the College of Health Sciences may approve substitution of required and/or elective courses. Requirement for the minor must be completed prior to graduation. Prospective students should contact the Coordinator of the minor in health sciences: Dr. William Ebomoyi, E-mail: eebomoyi@csu.edu Office: 773.995.2527

Health Sciences (H SC) Course Offerings

1104/ 104 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY (3)

A study of medical terms used in health communications, quality assurance programs, health research, and health data classification systems.

2150/ 150 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH PROFESSIONS (3)

An overview of health care delivery systems including roles, functions, and educational preparation of health professionals, structure of health care organizations, and societal influences. Includes observations at health care settings.

2190/ 190 INTRODUCTION TO NUTRITION (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 1050/ 105.

Study of nutrients, their function, food sources, and utilization. Current issues in nutrition explored. Based on adult needs and the needs of individuals throughout the life cycle.

2210/ 210 LEGAL ASPECTS OF HEALTH CARE (2)

Introduction to law as it relates to health care. Review of United States legal system. Malpractice issues and patients’ rights emphasized.

2215/ 215 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS FOR ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (3)

Computer applications as applied to allied health professions. Concepts in the use of word processing, spread sheets, databases, and graphs will be integrated with the health care professions.

2220/ 220 PERSONAL HEALTH AND WELLNESS (2)

Co-requisite: Concurrent enrollment in a one credit hour physical education course.

An overview of wellness concepts and theories from interdisciplinary perspectives. Students will plan and implement wellness activities from a holistic approach for individuals, family groups and communities. This course is designed to help students develop skills, attitudes, beliefs, and habits by providing learning experiences that will assist them in achieving an optimal level of wellness through self-responsibility. The course includes an activity component which involves concurrent registration in a physical education course worth one credit hour. Credit not given for both H SC 2220/ 220 and HPR 1200/220.

2250/ 250 HEALTH CARE ETHICS (3)

Health ethics is designed to facilitate exploration of ethical theory as a framework for professional judgment and decision making. Ethical theory will be applied in examination of ethical dilemmas frequently encountered in the health professions. Credit not given for both NURS 2275/ 250 and H SC 2250/ 250.

2265/ 265 ALTERNATIVE HEALTH CARE (3)

This course is designed to investigate the various systems that make up alternative/complimentary medicine. The course is intended as an educational tool to acquaint students with alternative methods for the maintenance of good health and treatment of illness.

3310/ 310 HIV IN PEOPLE OF COLOR (3)

Prerequisite: Consent of program coordinator/department of Health Studies.

This is a survey course looking at the impact of HIV on minority populations. This course will examine psychosocial issues, access to treatment, demographics and economic issues. Special populations such as teenagers, elders and pregnant women will also be examined. Credit not given for both H SC 3310/ 310 and NURS 3310/ 310.

3313/ 313 HEALTH DISPARITIES (2)

CO/Prerequisites: ENG 1280/ 128; H SC 3319/ 319, or consent of chairperson.

Exploration of the role of race and ethnicity in relationship to heal care access and quality of care; social factors contributing to mortality, longevity, and life expectancy; access and utilization of health services; theoretical framework for the development of policy and interventions to address disparities in health related outcomes.

3314/ 414 ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN HEALTH CARE (3)

CO/Prerequisites: ENG 1280/ 128; H SC 3319/ 319, H SC 2375/ 375; or consent of chairperson.

This course provides students with basic strategies and tools for entrepreneurial management with a focus on the health care industry.

3315/ 315 HEALTH BEHAVIOR (3)

Prerequisites: ENG 1280/ 128; ANTH 1010/ 101; PSYC 1100/ 141, or consent of department chairperson.

Provides fundamental concepts in social-behavioral sciences and health; social behavioral science factors identified as causes and antecedents to health; mechanisms for changes in health as well as outcomes of health interventions; prevailing health behavior change concepts and models; and methods for developing, implementing and evaluating health behavior interventions.

3316/ 316 MEDICAL SCIENCE (3)

Prerequisites: ENG 1280/ 128; BIOL 2020/ 220 or 2021/ 221; ZOOL 2050/ 250;

PSLY 204; PSYC 217 or 204; or consent of department chairperson.

Provides the disease processes and functional disorders and their anatomical substrates. Major emphasis will be with on the cardiovascular, neuromuscular, and skeletal systems. Management of patients with medical, pediatric, psychiatric, orthopedic, and neurological diagnosis will be presented.

3317/ 317 HEALTH PROMOTION (3)

Prerequisites: ENG 1280/ 128; BIOL 1080/ 108; CMAT 1130/ 113 or 2030/ 203 or 2210/ 221 or consent of department chairperson.

Provides an overview of major health behavior models and theories that guide health promotion interventions. It will cover known threats to health, classic studies, examples of intervention strategies and issues in planning and evaluation of intervention programs.

4418/ 318 BASIC EPIDEMIOLOGY FOR HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS (3)

Prerequisites: ENG 1280/ 128; BIOL 1080/ 108; HSC3329; MATH 1600/ 210; or consent of department chairperson.

Introduction to the distribution and patterns of health events in populations and the determinants that influence those patterns; epidemiological concepts, methods and tools epidemiologists use to study the distribution of health in populations as applied to both clinical and public health settings.

3319/ 319 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HEALTH (3)

Prerequisites: ENG 1280/ 128; BIOL 1080/ 108; or consent of chairperson.

Introduction to public health practice as a scientific discipline. Provides an understanding of the various approaches to public health practice, public health stakeholders, determinants of public health, and the role of local, state, and federal public health agencies in protecting community health; ecological overview of the collaboration by local, state, federal, and international public agencies to assure a health global community.

3321/ 321 SERVICE LEARNING IN HEALTH (3)

Prerequisites: Consent of Chairperson.Link between theory and practice in authentic settings. Expands the walls of the traditional classroom, providing opportunities for active and cooperative learning, interdisciplinary projects, and multicultural experiences grounded in local community issues that enliven the teaching learning process.

3200/ 322 RESEARCH METHODS (3)

Prerequisites: ENG 1280/ 128; PSYCH 4190;or Math 1600/ 210; or consent of chairperson.

Introduction to the principles and strategies of scientific research in the health professions. Covers the fundamentals of defining a research problem, designing a study, measuring variables, selecting a sample, analyzing data, and critiquing published research.

4423/ 323 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH (3)

Prerequisites: ENG. 1280/ 128; BIOL 1080/ 108; CHEM 1050/ 105 or 1550/ 155; or consent of chairperson.

Various aspects of human health, including quality of life, that are impacted by physical, chemical, biological, social, and psychological factors in the environment; theory and practice of assessing, correcting, controlling, and preventing those factors in the environment that adversely affect the health of present and future generations; ecosystems interaction, biological and chemical toxins in the general environment and relevant environmental regulations.

4424/ 324 PROGRAM PLANNING (3)

Prerequisites: ENG 1280/ 128; H SC 3317/ 317; or consent of department chairperson.

Exploration of evaluation of programmatic health needs and resources necessary for effective service delivery; planning and development of service centered programs for populations across the health and illness continuum. 

4425/ 325 COMMUNITY HEALTH PRACTICUM (6)

Prerequisites: H SC 3321/ 321; completion of basic sciences and medical sciences; or consent of department chairperson.

Integral part of professional education that complements and supports the learning process in the classroom. Provides students with opportunities to apply knowledge and skills in a variety of work situations and to test new approaches and techniques to problem solving. Course may be taken twice for up to 6 credit hours.

3326/ 326 AGING AND HEALTH (3)

Prerequisites: ENG 1280/ 128; BIOL 1080/ 108; CMAT 1130/ 113 or 2030/ 203

or 2210/ 221; or consent of department chairperson. Provides an overview of the external and internal factors influencing the health status of older persons. Emphasis on the implications for health practitioners.

3327/ 327 BIOTERRORISM AND HEALTH (3)

Prerequisites: ENG 1280/ 128; BIOL 1080/ 108; or consent of chairperson.

Explores the impact of bioterrorism on health. Presentation of various biological agents that can affect the quality of life and well-being of populations. Highlights illnesses and diseases that may be caused by biological agents and provides interventions to promote health and prevent complications.

3328/ 328 CURRENT TRENDS IN INTERNATIONAL HEALTH (3)

Prerequisites: ENG 1280/ 128; BIOL 1080/ 108; ANTH 1010/ 101 or SOC 1250.

Major trends and issues with governments and international organizations. Explores the social determinants of health; organization of health (care) systems, health care financing, international health agencies and development; politics, globalization and health; the public role in international health policy making.

3329/329 INTRODUCTION TO BIOSTATISTICS (3)

This course covers various aspects of biostatics in healthcare, including how they are used, the meaning of population and the process of sample selection, data summary, organization and data presentation using parametric and non-parametric statistics.

3375/ 375 HEALTH POLICY (3)

Prerequisite: Consent of the department.

Designed to introduce the student to the components and functions of health care systems. The main focus will be on the U.S. health care system, but approaches to health care in other countries will be discussed.

Health care systems will be critically examined. Attention will be given to the roles of health care professional’s interacting with health care systems. Credit not given for both NURS 3375/ 375 and H SC 3375/ 375.