Psychology (Counseling)

Department Chairperson:Ivy Dunn

Graduate Program Advisor :Karen D. McCurtis-Witherspoon

Graduate Faculty:Lindsay Bicknell-Hentges, Paula Chrishon, Jacqueline A. Conley, Alonzo DeCarlo, Tadesse W. Giorgis, John J. Lynch, Karen D. McCurtis-Whitherspoon,

The Counseling Graduate Program of the Department of Psychology offers graduate study leading to a Master of Arts degree in Counseling. The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA), has granted accreditation to both counseling programs of Chicago State University: Community Counseling (M.A.) and School Counseling (M.A.).

The Counseling Graduate Program is designed to train students as counselors so they can work in a variety of settings with an emphasis on training counselors to work with urban youth and their families. It is also designed as a pre-doctoral study program in counselor education and supervision, counseling, or psychology. Graduates of the School Track are eligible to work as counselors in school settings. Graduates of the Community Track are eligible to work as counselors in a variety of community settings. The program currently qualifies students to sit for examinations for counseling certification (NCC) and Illinois Licensure for professional counselors; the requirements for these examinations are subject to change and additional requirements may be added. Completion of the master’s degree program in counseling (School Track) qualifies students for the Type 73 School Service Personnel Certificate for the School Counselor. Certification requires the successful completion of the Illinois Certification Tests of Basic Skills and School Counseling. Students with a master’s degree in counseling or related field who want only an endorsement and certification in school counseling, must satisfy all of the requirements of the school counseling degree. The Endorsement in School Counseling Certificate Program has 31 hours of prerequisites and 15 hours of additional required coursework (totaling 51 hours. More information about the program can be obtained in the Chicago State University Master of Arts in Counseling Student Handbook.

Master of Arts in Counseling

Mission Statement

The mission of the program is to produce highly qualified graduates equipped to serve the complex counseling demands in urban settings with a specific emphasis on addressing the needs of urban youth and their families. This mission is generated from a belief that counselors equipped to deal with the more difficult problems within large cities will also be effective in other, less challenging settings. To accomplish its mission, the program is committed to:

  • Recruiting, retaining and graduating culturally and economically diverse students.
  • Employing a dedicated, caring, and culturally diverse faculty whose teaching is informed by research and clinical experience.
  • Providing a curriculum that is infused with theory and applications related to diverse urban populations.
  • Providing students with a strong preparation in counseling
    interventions and models of prevention directed toward meeting the complex counseling needs within urban and other settings.
  • Providing opportunities for practical counseling experiences within urban schools and communities.
  • Teaching students how to access resources, advocate for their clients and their profession, and serve as community activist when needed; and
  • Working with partnership with local institutions and agencies in the region to assist in the development of socially and economically viable and sustainable communities.

Program Description

The school counseling program is designed to prepare students to serve the multiple mental health or counseling needs within schools in an urban setting. Students will be given a strong preparation in clinical intervention with a specific emphasis on meeting the needs of urban youth and their families. Additionally, students will learn how to develop a primary intervention program that impacts the entire school community through implementation of The Developmental Counseling Model. Students will also learn how to organize counseling interventions, which are integrated into the school curriculum. Prevention and early intervention will be the primary goals taught to our students.

Students choosing to emphasize human services counseling or prepare for careers in community agencies such as mental health clinics, substance abuse facilities, and/or to work as developmental interventionists and consultants in a wide variety of educational and non-educational settings can enroll in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling track. Students in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling track will also be given strong preparation in clinical intervention, with specific focus on addressing the needs of urban youth and their families. Students in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling track will learn how the family and community contexts impact behavior as well as how to plan and implement effective interventions within the community context.

Admission Requirements

  • Submission of an application, official transcript(s) and two reference forms) one from either a college instructor or supervisor at work) to CSU Office of Graduate Studies by March 1 for the fall Semester. (Students will only be admitted into the program once a year for the Fall Semester.)
  • Completion of six credit hours of prerequisite courses, which must include three credit hours in developmental psychology and psychological statistics (with a grade of B or better in at least one). A student may be granted conditional admission until the prerequisites are met. Prerequisites must be completed in the first year of the program.
  • GPA: Minimum 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) for final 60 hours of undergraduate work. Applicants whose grade point average is between 2.75 and 2.99 may qualify for conditional admission.
  • Successful completion of a written essay and personal interview with faculty for the purpose of assessing oral communication, writing, interpersonal skills, and the applicant’s potential for the counseling field.
  • Applicants for the School Counseling track or the Endorsement in School Counseling Certificate Program must have passed the Illinois Basic Skills Test. In addition, they must have a valid Illinois Teaching Certificate or they must take the course ED 4820/5820 course –Educational Fundamentals in School Counseling as a program prerequisite. Providing they have passed the Illinois Basic Skills Exam, students who do not have a valid Illinois Teaching Certificate may be admitted conditionally pending successful completion of the Education course within the first year. Certified teachers must have proof of a passing score report on the Illinois Certification Test of Basic Skills passed anytime since 1987.
  • Due to limited class size, not all qualified applicants may be accepted.

Full Admission

Full admission to the program is granted when all admission criteria are met.

Transfer Courses

Courses taken at other institutions which are to be applied to the counseling degree requirements must be evaluated and approved by an advisor in writing within the first semester after acceptance. Courses taken from other institutions after admission into the program must be pre-approved by an advisor in writing, must be of a grade of B or better, and must be completed within six years of graduation in order to be applied to degree requirements. No more than a total of nine transferred credit hours can be applied to the degree.

General Requirements

  • Completion of all required and elective courses, at the graduate level with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher.
  • Acceptance into candidacy before completing clinical courses.
  • Students must complete the following precandidacy with a B or better: PSYC 5650, 414, 5670/423,
  • Students must successfully pass the Comprehensive Examinations (Part 1- Objective and Part 2 – Essay).
  • Students must successfully complete a Practicum (Field Experience) of 100 clock hours and an Internship of 600 clock hours.
  • Completion of all clinical courses (PSYC 5790/431, 5950/434, 5990/490 or 5991/491) with a grade of B or better.
  • Students in the School Counseling Program must pass the type 73 Certification Exam in School Counseling and must have already passed the Basic Skills Exam.
  • Students must complete all degree requirements within six years.

Specific Requirements

Option I - School Track (Total 51 hours) 

Core Courses 33 credit hours

PSYC 5600/406, 5660, 5710/412, 5720/413, 5650/414, 5640/416, 5730, 5670/423, 5760/424, 5800/429, 5740.

Special Courses 12 credit hours

PSYC 5790/431, 5950/434, 5990.

Elective Courses 6 credit hours

5000 level courses selected with advisor’s approval.

Option II – Clinical Mental Health Counseling Track (Total 54 hours)

Core Courses 33 credit hours

PSYC 5611, 5710/412, 5720/413, 5650/414, 5640/416, 5730/422, 5800/429, 5750/430, 5660, 5670/423, 5740, 5790/431, 5810/436

Special Courses 15 credit hours

PSYC 5790/431, 5950/434, 5991/491, 5840/455.

Elective Courses 3 credit hours

5500-level courses or higher, selected with advisor’s approval.

Thesis Option

Students who are interested in pursuing a doctoral degree after graduating from the Counseling Graduate Program are strongly encouraged to complete a thesis in lieu of six hours of graduate electives. More information about this option can be obtained by contacting an advisor (773-995-2359) or the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies (773-995-2404).

Bilingual Specialization

Students accepted in to the Community or School Counseling Programs as well as the Endorsement in School Counseling Certificate Program may apply for a Bilingual Specialization. The Bilingual Specialization requires that a candidate successful complete the Helping Hispanic Families course with a grade of B or better, satisfy the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) requirements for the Advanced Plus Level in Spanish, and complete a practicum in a school of community setting serving Latino clients. Students interested in obtaining the Bilingual Specialization can request an application from the Counseling Graduate Program. Language proficiency will be initially screened by the Foreign Languages and Literature Department of Chicago State University. Final testing for the language requirements will be conducted by ACTFL

Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Counselor Training

The purpose of this certificate program is to prepare students to sit for the examination administered by theIllinois Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Professional Certification Association.

Required Courses (30 credit hours)

PSYC 1100/141, 2040/204, 4200/311, 4201/312, 4202/313, 4203/314, 4204/316, 4155/336, 4205/363, 4206/370.

Endorsement in School Counseling Graduate Certificate Program

Important note about admission to the endorsement program: Given the Counseling. The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) requirements for faculty-student ratios, only a limited number of students can be admitted to this program. Priority will be given to graduates for the Chicago State University Community Counseling Program who are seeking an endorsement in school counseling. All students interested in applying for this program must have passed the Illinois Basic Skills Test and have a Master’s in Counseling or Counseling Related field. Applicants can submit applications for the Fall semester by March 1 and for the Spring semester by October 15 to The School of Graduate and Professional Studies. All registrations for graduate Psychology/Counseling classes and the ED 4820/5820 Fundamentals in School Counseling must be signed by an advisor of the Counseling Graduate Program in HWH 311 (773-995-2359). Any student that enrolls in one of these courses without having an advising form signed (and a copy left in the student’s file in the department office) will be administratively withdrawn from the course(s) and is subject to disciplinary action, which could result in dismissal from the university.

The purpose of this certificate program, a 15 credit hour graduate sequence, is is to provide a Type 73 endorsement in school counseling for students with a master’s degree in school counseling or related field. Some students entering the program will already have a master’s in School Counseling and others may have a master’s in Community Counseling or closely related degree. Applicants for the program must have an appropriate master’s degree and have passed the Illinois Basic Skills Exam. In addition, they must have a valid Illinois Teaching Certificate or they must take the course ED 5820/382G,Educational Fundamentals in School Counseling as a program prerequisite within the first year of the endorsement program. Providing they have passed the Illinois Basic Skills Exam, students who do not have a valid Illinois Teaching Certificate may be admitted conditionally, pending successful completion of the education course within the first year. Students will not be allowed to take the education course unless they have been conditionally admitted to the endorsement program. The program prerequisites and requirements will meet all of the criteria necessary for endorsement in School Counseling.

The program emphasizes the Developmental School Counseling Model, strong clinical training, and applied field practice as a school counselor in an elementary and high school setting.

The certificate must be completed in three years.

Program Prerequisites (36 hours of prerequisites required.)

Program prerequisites include the following courses or courses judged by the program coordinator as having similar content:

PSYC 5600 /406 or 396G/400; PSYC 5660 or 410 or 407 or 409; PSYC 5710/412 or 355G or 405; PSYC 5720/413 or 347G or 404; PSYC 5650/414; PSYC 5650/416; PSYC 5730/417 or 5730/422; PSYC 5760/423; PSYC 5760/431 or 433; or PSYC 419; PSYC 5810/434 or 420 must have completed a minimum of 100 hours of practicumwith children and adolescents only ); PSYC 5840/455; and 3 additional hours of graduate level electives in counseling or a related field (e.g., 5815, 5820, 5850, 2200, etc.), not including PSYC 5500/300G or below and courses in personality theory, abnormal psychology, or psychological statistics.

Course Requirements (15 credit hours)

PSYC 5760/424, 5800/429, 5740, 443, 5990/490.

Internship in School Counseling ( PSYC 5990/490 3-6 hours): 300 or 600 Clock Hours Field/ prerequisite: Completion of all required graduate level courses, passing the Illinois Type 73 Certification Exam in School Counseling, and written application submitted by appropriate deadline. Admission to the master’s degree program or the Type 73 Endorsement in School Counseling Certificate Program. Supervised field placement in a school setting (K-12). May be taken for three credit yours indicating 300 hours of experience or six credit hours indicating 600 hours of experience. May be taken twice for three credit hours of once for six credit hours to fulfill the required six credit hours of internship.

Requirement: Students must successfully pass the Illinois Basic Skills Exam and the Illinois State Type 73 Certification Exam in Counselingprior to enrolling in PSYC 5990.

Other Requirements

  • Proof of passing the Illinois Certification Content Area Test for school counselors prior to enrollment in PSYC 5990/490.

  • The certificate must be completed in three years.

Course Offerings

Psychology (PSYC)

5150/318 PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141.

Course examines the major theories of personality and provides an integrative framework for understanding the dynamics of personality.

5185/331 STATISTICAL METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 2080/231 or equivalent.

Inferential statistics: point estimates, confidence intervals, one-sample Z and t- tests, two-sample Z and t tests, analysis of variance.

5155/336 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141.

Behavior deviating from normal and its treatment.

5170 INTERNSHIP IN SPIRITUAL PSYCHOLOGY (3-6)

Prerequisites: PSYC 1100, completion of 9 credit hours in psychology, or consent of department.

Supervised internship that provides experiences in spiritual counseling. Students are placed in a religious institution or other organization that provides counseling from a spiritual perspective. May be taken in a two-semester sequences for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

5180/358 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 2080/231 or PSYC 4190/357; or MATH 1600/210 and PSYC 4185/331; or consent of the department.

Design computer spreadsheets and data base files for statistical analysis in research. Become proficient in SPSS, EXCEL, Internet, and other applications used in the behavioral sciences.

5190/357 FUNDAMENTALS OF STATISTICAL METHODS (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141.

Descriptive statistics through correlation and regression. Inferential statistics: point estimates, confidence intervals, one-sample Z and t tests of significance, two-sample Z and t tests of significance.

5200/311 PHARMACOLOGY FOR ADDICTIONS (3)

Prerequisites: PSYC 1100/141, 4155/336.

Classification of alcohol and other drugs’ physical and psychological effects, medical complications, assessment an diagnostic techniques, treatment settings and modalities.

5201/312 ETHICS AND ADDICTION (3)

Prerequisite : PSYC 1100/141,2040/204 or 200/217, 5155/336. Successful completion of English, math, and reading qualifying examinations.

Prepares students to develop ethical standards and apply them in alcohol and drug dependency counseling.

5202/313 CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY COUNSELING (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141, 4155/336, 5205/363.

Theory and practice of counseling addictions. Individual, family, group approaches. Screening, intake, treatment delivery models.

5203/314 COMMUNITY AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE/ADDICTIONS (3)

Prerequisites: PSYC 1100/141,2040/204 or 2000/217.

Influence of drugs and alcohol on family, community violence. Incidence, prevalence, theories, causation, risk factors, long term effects. Prevention strategies.

5204/316 AODA FIELD EXPERIENCE (3-6)

Prerequisites: PSYC 1100/141, 4202/313, 4206/370.

Focuses on demonstrating competency in the 12 core functions and 8 practice dimensions of substance use disorder counseling. Supervised field experience using knowledge and practicing skills learned in the classroom.

5205/363 PSYCHOLOGY OF DRUG ADDICTION (3) 

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141 and consent of the department.

Introductory course in the chemical, psychological, social and treatment aspects of drug use, abuse and dependency. Drug abuse prevention will be introduced through elementary theories of open communication.

5206/370 ADDICTION ASSESSMENT/CASE MANAGEMENT (3)

Prerequisites: PSYC 1100/141, 4155/336, 5205/363.

Introduction to and training in basic intake, assessment, diagnosis, treatment planning, referral, ,insurance, and other aspects of effective case management.

5207 GROUP WORK IN ADDICTIONS COUNSELING (3)

Prerequisites: PSYC 1100, 4205/5205.

Overview of group counseling with substance abusers in a variety of rehabilitation programs. Experiential group counseling focus. Participation in a counseling group with a personal growth focus followed by a period of didactic processing.

5210/377 ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY FOR MIDDLE GRADE TEACHERS (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 1100/141

Explores the development issues of early adolescence as they pertain to middle school education. Explores the advisory role of middle school teachers in assessing, coordinating, and referring students to health and social service agencies.

Note: Unless permission of the department is given, only students enrolled in the school or community counseling programs are eligible to enroll for 400-level classes. Prior consultation with the department is required for enrollment into any 400-level courses in psychology.

5600/406 INTRODUCTION TO SCHOOL COUNSELING (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of program prerequisites or concurrent enrollment and admission into the counseling master’s degree program.

Introduction to the roles and functions of the school counselor within a developmental and other school counseling programs. Examines all aspects of professional functioning including history, organizational structure, ethics, standards, and credentialing. Credit not given for both PSYC 406 and 400.

5610/411 PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNITY COUNSELING (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of program prerequisites or concurrent enrollment and admission into the counseling master’s degree program.

Principles of counseling in a community agency setting. History and philosophy of psychological counseling, role and training of the counselor, modes of intervention, consultation theory, and ethics of counseling.

5611 PRINCIPLES IN CLINICAL MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to Counseling Graduate Program or permission of the department.

Addresses the roles, functions, settings, and management of clinical mental health counseling. Introduces relevant models and theories, ethical and legal issues, professional organizations, preparation standards and credentialing, and management of mental health services.

5650/414 MICROCOUNSELING (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 5600/406 or 5610/411 or concurrent enrollment. Admission to the master’s degree program.

Practical and experiential laboratory designed to build basic counseling and interviewing skills, including counselor self-awareness. Focus on development of understanding of the counseling process through readings, lectures, analogue exercises, and video demonstrations.

5640/416 COUNSELING THEORIES AND ETHICS (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 5600/406 or 5610/411 or concurrent enrollment. Admission to the master’s degree program.

Major theories, principles, ethical concerns, and techniques of counseling. Introduction to Afro-centric and other models and exploration of techniques for children, adolescents, and special populations.

5660 ADVANCED LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT & COUNSELING APPLICATIONS (3)

Prerequisites: PSYC 5600/406 or 411/5610 or concurrent enrollment.

Examines development and counseling across the life span and addresses issues that impact counseling and development such as ethnicity, economics, disabilities, and abuse/neglect. Introduces concepts of family development and basic learning theory.

5670/423 PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES OF GROUP COUNSELING (3)

Prerequisites: PSYC 5600/406 or 411/5610 or concurrent enrollment. Admission to the master’s degree program.

Group methods for identifying, understanding, and solving common problems. Explores counseling and therapy in a group setting.

5710/412 MULTICULTURAL ISSUES IN COUNSELING (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 5600/406 or 5610/411 or concurrent enrollment. Admission into the master’s degree program..

This course is designed to build expertise in counseling individuals from diverse cultural backgrounds including but not limited to individuals of African American, Hispanic, Asian, and American heritage. It includes a study of change, ethnicity, changing roles of women and sexism, urban and rural societies, changing population patterns, cultural mores, and differing life patterns.

5720/413 LIFE STYLE AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 5600/406 or 5610/411 or concurrent enrollment. Admission to the master’s degree program.

Theories and principles of vocational choice, relationship between career choice and life style, sources of occupational and educational information, computerized guidance services, financial aid, college admissions, approaches to career decision making processes and career development exploration techniques.

Selection, administration, interpretation and evaluative use of intelligence, aptitude, personality, interest, and achievement tests. Use and/or construction of questionnaires, sociograms, anecdotal records, and other appraisal devices. Practice of different diagnosis and clinical interviewing. Additional course fee.

5730 TECHNIQUES OF ASSESSMENT AND DIAGNOSIS (3)

Prerequisites: PSYC 5600 or 5610 or concurrent enrollment; PSYC 4190/357 or equivalent basic statistics course. Admission to the master’s degree program.

Selection, administration, interpretation, and evaluative use of intelligence, aptitude, personality, interest, and achievement test. Use and/or construction of questionnaires, sociograms, anecdotal records, and other appraisal devices. Practice of differential diagnosis and clinical interviewing. Additional course fee.

5740 TREATMENT INTERVENTIONS IN URBAN YOUTH AND FAMILIES (3)

Prerequisites: PSYC 5600 or 5610 and PSYC 5660. Admission to the master’s degree program.

Seminar on issues (e.g.) gangs, violence, abuse, drugs, poverty, etc.) facing youth and families in urban inner-city environments. Exposes students to theories of adolescent development, how development, how development is comprised in such youth, and using research to guide effective treatment strategies for this population. Introduces family system theory and application with youth and families.

5745 SPIRITUALITY IN COUNSELING (3)

Prerequisites: Explores implications for addressing client spirituality in the counseling process.  Spiritual (e.g. 12-step programs) models, faith-based programs, methods for working with clients' diverse beliefs, ethical issues, research findings, and spiritual assessment techniquests will be examined.

5760/424 ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT OF DEVELOPMENTAL COUNSELING PROGRAMS (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 406/5600. Admission to the master’s degree program.

Organization and management of the developmental model of counseling, programs within the school setting. Exposes student to the counseling curriculum, individual planning, responsive services, consultation theory, needs assessment, and program and system support. Applications to urban setting and special populations..

5930/427 PRACTICUM IN GROUP COUNSELING (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 5670/423. Admission to the master’s degree program.

Supervised training in advanced techniques of group facilitation and group counseling in school and community agencies.

5815/428 COUNSELING SPECIAL POPULATIONS (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 5650/414 and 5640/416. Admission to the master’s degree program.

Seminar course focusing on issues encountered by school and community counselors. Issues include, but are not limited to, substance abuse, sexuality, single parent and blended families, bilingual children, and clients with physical or mental disabilities.

5800/429 RESEARCH STATISTICS AND PROGRAM EVALUATION (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 2080/231 or 4190/357, or equivalent basic statistics course. Admission to the master’s degree program.

Study of research methods, both qualitative and quantitative computer programs for data management and testing; application of program evaluation principles; legal and ethical considerations in research and programs.

5750/430 INTRODUCTION TO FAMILY SYSTEMS COUNSELING (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 5650/414, 5640/416. Admission to the master’s degree program.

An introduction to general systems theory and survey of the major systems of family therapy, emphasizing theory and treatment strategies.

5790/431 PRE-PRACTICUM COUNSELING LABORATORY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 5600/406 or 5610/411; 5660, 5650/414, 5640/416, and accepted as candidate for clinical courses. Completion of all pre-candidacy courses in the program and written application submitted by appropriate deadline.

Clinical laboratory experience with actual clients and live and videotaped supervision in techniques of counseling/psychotherapy.

5950/434 PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING II (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of PSYC 431/433, accepted as a candidate for clinical courses and written application during semester prior to enrollment. Admission to the master’s degree program.

Supervised field placement in counseling/psychotherapy. Minimum of 100 hours of supervised experience required in field placement.

5810/436 THEORIES AND PRACTICES OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE COUNSELING (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 5611 or 5610/411

The assessment, etiology, description, understanding, and treatment of addictions. Addresses prevention, education, dual diagnosis, risk assessment, crisis intervention, and issues related to diagnosis and treatment in multicultural populations. Evidence-based individual and group interventions will be studied.

5910/437 ADVANCED CLINICAL TRAINING-SUBSTANCE ABUSE (PRACTICUM I) (3)

Prerequisite: Master’s degree in counseling(equivalent) and/or consent of the department. Admission to the master’s degree program.

Supervised advanced clinical/skill techniques and applications of substance abuse therapy. Forty clock hours in field.

5920/438 ADVANCED FIELD TRAINING SUBSTANCE ABUSE (PRACTICUM II) (3)

Prerequisite: Master’s degree and/or consent of the department. Admission to the master’s degree program. 

Supervised advanced field experience in selected substance abuse centers. Six to eight clock hours per week.

5820/442 CASE MANAGEMENT IN SCHOOL COUNSELING (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 5600/406 or 5610/411, or concurrent enrollment in the same.

Basic concepts of special educational law, assessment, classification, and the development of Individual Educational Plans through multidisciplinary staffings involving parents, students, and school professionals. Emphasis on the practice of effective case management which maximizes learning through appropriate special education procedures, counseling, school programs, and communication with parents of exceptional children.

5830/445 ADVANCED EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 2000/217 or 2040/204.

A seminar in the critical analysis of educational theories, instructional techniques and implementation in learning experiences, including measurement, evaluation and applications in the educational setting.

5840/455 ADVANCED PSYCHOPATHOLOGY (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 5600/406 or 5610/411, or concurrent enrollment in the same.

The assessment, etiology, description, understanding, and treatment of psychological disorders. Included in the study are schizophrenia, affective and anxiety disorders, substance abuse/dependency, personality disorders, disorders of childhood and adolescence as well as other disorders in the DSM-IV and issues related to diagnosis and treatment in multicultural populations.

5850/459 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COUNSELING (3)

Seminar focusing on a specific topic in counseling. The exact topic will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated with a different topic. (Maximum of six hours.)

5992/460 THESIS IN GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING (3-6)

Prerequisite: Completion of all required graduate courses and consent of the department. Admission to the master’s degree program.

Supervised research and thesis in guidance and counseling as approved by the department. (May be taken in two semesters, with three hours per semester for up to six hours.)

5860/465 COUNSELING CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 5650/414, 5640/416, or consent of the department.

Overview of theories and techniques in child/adolescent counseling in experiential and didactic format. Utilizes play media to facilitate expression, self-understanding, personal growth and development. Includes observation and supervised experiences. Additional course fee.

5890/479 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN COUNSELING (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to the master’s degree program and consent of the department.

Independent and/or group studies, relating to student’s special interests or programs. Hours are to be arranged.

5990/490 INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL COUNSELING (3 OR 6)

Prerequisite: Completion of all required 5000-level courses, passing the Illinois Type 73 Certification Examination in School Counseling, and written application submitted by appropriate deadline. Admission to the master’s degree program OR THE Type 73 Endorsement in School Counseling Certificate Program.

Supervised field placement in a school setting (K-12). May be taken for three credit hours indicating 300 hours of experience or six credit hours indicating 600 hours of experience. May be taken twice for three credit hours or once for six credit hours to fulfill the required six credit hours of internship.

5991/491 INTERNSHIP IN COMMUNITY COUNSELING (3 OR 6)

Prerequisite: Completion of all required 5000-level courses and written application submitted by appropriate deadline. Admission to the master’s degree program.

Supervised field placement in a community setting. May be taken for three credit hours requiring 300 hours of experience or six credit hours requiring 600 hours of experience. May be taken twice for three credit hours or once for six credit hours to fulfill the required six credit hours of internship.