College of Pharmacy

Dean’s Message

“Preparing pharmacists from diverse backgrounds to provide care for a global community!” This is a core value of the Chicago State University College of Pharmacy.

This is an exciting time for the profession of pharmacy. There continues to be an increasing demand for graduate pharmacists in traditional as well as new and emerging professional career paths. Pharmacists, as some of the most highly respected members of the health care profession, have evolved from dispensers of medications to providers of health care services. The pharmacist’s ability to provide care for patients is professionally rewarding and provides an opportunity to improve the health of individuals as well as the community at large.

The College’s curriculum is dynamic and embraces a student-centered learning philosophy. Through small group learning communities, students are expected to be active participants in their learning. Faculty mentors work with students to help them achieve their full academic and professional goals. The early integration of experiential education allows students to apply their classroom knowledge in community, hospital, ambulatory care and public health practice settings. These experiences help to “connect the dots” through solidifying the relevance and importance of the pharmacist’s role in helping patients achieve positive health outcomes though safe and effective medication use.

The successes and tremendous growth of the College are directly related to the hard work and dedication of the faculty, staff and students. During the 2009-10 academic year, the College received Candidate accreditation status from the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) and welcomed the Class of 2013, the second student cohort, into its doors. Student organizations flourished, students and faculty received recognitions (internal and external) for academic as well as professional achievements, curricular integration was deemed “noteworthy” by ACPE, faculty research collaborations expanded and professional practice partnerships were enhanced. These are but a few of the significant highlights and accomplishments of the College that demonstrate our continued commitment to excellence. We have built a dynamic and challenging program that endeavors to provide a high quality educational experience that will allow outstanding pharmacists to take their places in the “provision of care for a global community.” We invite motivated students and faculty to join us on this exceptional journey.

Miriam A. Mobley Smith, Pharm.D.

Interim Dean, College of Pharmacy

Chicago State University

Administrative Officers

Interim Dean

Miriam A. Mobley Smith, Pharm.D.

Associate Dean

TBA

Assistant Dean, Student Affairs

Michael T. Ellison, Ed.D.

Chair, Pharmaceutical Sciences

Elmer J. Gentry, Ph.D.

Chair, Pharmacy Practice

Dolores Nobles-Knight, Pharm.D., MPH

Director of Experiential Education

Charisse Johnson, Pharm.D., M.S.

Vision and Mission Statement

Vision Statement:

The Chicago State University College of Pharmacy will be recognized for its impact on the health care needs of diverse populations through its contributions in education, training, scholarship, service and research. The College will serve an integral role within the University by providing a culturally diverse and intellectually stimulated community of scholars engaged in the collective creation and dissemination of knowledge.

Mission Statement:

The mission of Chicago State University College of Pharmacy (CSU-COP) is the development of student and faculty scholars who will impact the health care needs of people in the region, state and the nation. The College will provide a strong foundation in the knowledge, integration and application of the biomedical, pharmaceutical and clinical sciences resulting in practitioners who are committed to humanistic service, capable of providing patient-centered care and leaders in advancing the pharmacy profession. The College embraces the mission of the University to educate individuals from economically or educationally disadvantaged backgrounds to strengthen the simultaneous provision of culturally competent care and reduction of health care disparities.

To accomplish its mission, the College of Pharmacy is committed to:

  • Recruiting, retaining and graduating student pharmacists from diverse populations;

  • Recruiting, hiring and retaining qualified faculty from diverse populations who will be engaged as teachers, scholars, researchers, service providers, mentors and leaders;

  • Recruiting, hiring and retaining staff dedicated to supporting the educational mission;

  • Offering a curriculum that cultivates analytical thinking, ethical reasoning and decision-making, intellectual curiosity, multidisciplinary and inter-professional collaboration, professionalism and service;

  • Enabling students and faculty to provide patient-centered care to diverse patient populations through the safe, evidence-based and cost-beneficial use of medications;

  • Fostering an environment for student engagement which encourages leadership in campus, public and professional communities;

  • Refining programmatic and curricular goals, policies and procedures through ongoing assessment and evaluation;

  • Establishing and enhancing community, educational and professional partnerships;

  • Expanding institutional resource capabilities through active pursuit of extramural funding support;

  • Developing and strengthening post-graduate education and training opportunities;

  • Providing programs and services that promote a supportive atmosphere for life-long learning and continued personal and professional development for students, faculty and staff.

Conferral of Degrees

Chicago State University has been granted authority by the Illinois Board of Higher Education to confer the Doctor of Pharmacy degree.

Accreditation Disclosure Statement

The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) 20 North Clark Street, Suite 2500 Chicago, IL 60602-5109, Phone: (312) 664-3575 • Fax: (312) 664-4652, accredits Doctor of Pharmacy programs offered by colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States and Puerto Rico. For a Doctor of Pharmacy Program offered by a new college or school of pharmacy, ACPE accreditation generally involves three steps: Precandidate status, Candidate status, and Full accreditation. 

Precandidate accreditation status denotes a developmental program, which is expected to mature in accord with stated plans and within a defined time period. Precandidate status is awarded to a new program of a college or school of pharmacy that has not yet enrolled students in the professional program; Candidate accreditation status is awarded to a Doctor of Pharmacy program that has students enrolled but has not yet had a graduating class. Full accreditation is awarded to a program that has met all ACPE standards for accreditation and has graduated its first class. Graduates of a class designated as having Candidate status have the same rights and privileges of those graduates from a fully accredited program, generally including eligibility for licensure. ACPE conveys its decision to the various boards of pharmacy and makes recommendations in accord with its decisions. It should be noted, however, that decisions concerning eligibility for licensure, by examination or reciprocity, reside with the respective boards of pharmacy in accordance with their state statues and administrative rules.

The Doctor of Pharmacy program of the Chicago State University College of Pharmacy was awarded Candidate accreditation status during the June 24-28, 2009 meeting of the ACPE Board of Directors based upon an on-site evaluation conducted April 14-16, 2009, and discussion with University and College officials. If the program continues to develop as planned, Full accreditation of the Doctor of Pharmacy program will be considered by the Board following the graduation of students from the program.

For further information, please visit the ACPE website at http://www.acpe-accredit.org/

Instructional Program

At CSU, students pursue the Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree. The CSU–COP Pharm.D. program prepares the student for entry into the profession of pharmacy. The entire program requires a total of six years of coursework, the first two years at CSU or another college and the final four years at CSU–COP. During their four years at CSU–COP, students complete a total of 141 semester hours of credit; 92 credit hours in required courses, 8 credit hours in professional elective courses, and 41 credit hours in experiential education.

Admissions – Deadlines & Requirements

PharmCAS Application: Required

Deadline: February 1

www.pharmcas.org

Supplemental Application: Required

Deadline : March 1

www.csu.edu/collegeofpharmacy/application.htm

Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) Required

Last Test Date for Fall Admission: October

www.pcatweb.info

Admissions Cycle: Rolling (December – May)

www.csu.edu/collegeofpharmacy/

The CSU–COP considers for admission those prospective students who possess the academic and professional promise necessary to become outstanding members of the pharmacy profession. To select these students, the College uses a rolling selection process within a competitive admissions framework.

Competitive Admissions

Within its competitive admissions framework, the CSU–COP uses multiple criteria to select the most qualified candidates from an applicant pool that exceeds the number of seats available.

Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission to the CSU–COP, a prospective student must do the following:

  1. Complete, or be in the process of completing, a minimum of 62 semester hours of nonremedial, prerequisite coursework from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university. All pre-pharmacy coursework requirements must be completed in the Spring Semester prior to matriculation. The student must earn a grade of C or better in each prerequisite course. Note: If a student has completed coursework at a foreign college or university, the student must provide acceptable proof of U.S. course/degree equivalency. The student must also complete at least 30 semester hours of his/her prerequisite coursework (including at least 15 semester hours in the sciences) at an accredited institution in the United States.

Pre-pharmacy Requirements: 

Course(s)

Semester Hrs

English (composition)

6

Biology (with laboratory)

8

Anatomy, human or vertebrate

3

General Chemistry (with laboratory)

8

Organic Chemistry (with laboratory)

8

Physics (mechanics, thermodynamics, force, and motion must be included. May be non-calculus based)

3

Calculus (integration and differentiation)

3

Speech (public speaking)

3

Economics (micro, macro, or general)

3

Statistics

3

Psychology or Sociology

3

Additional Coursework (divided among the humanities, fine arts, foreign language, business or computer sciences)

11

Total Credit Hours

62

Course(s)

Semester Hrs

English (composition)

6

Biology (with laboratory)

8

Anatomy, human or vertebrate

3

General Chemistry (with laboratory)

8

Organic Chemistry (with laboratory)

8

Physics (mechanics, thermodynamics, force, and motion must be included. May be non-calculus based)

3

Calculus (integration and differentiation)

3

Speech (public speaking)

3

Economics (micro, macro, or general)

3

Statistics

3

Psychology or Sociology

3

Additional Coursework (divided among the humanities, fine arts, foreign language, business or computer sciences)

11

Total Credit Hours

62

  1. Achieve a minimum cumulative, science/math and pre-pharmacy grade point average of 2.50 (on a 4.00 scale);

  2. Submit scores from the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT);

  3. Reflect a people/service orientation through community service or extracurricular activities;

  4. Reflect proper motivation for and commitment to the pharmacy profession as demonstrated by previous work, volunteer, or other life experiences;

  5. Possess the oral and written communication skills necessary to interact with patients and colleagues;

  6. Submit a completed application containing a personal statement; and

  7. Complete CSU–COP’s on-campus interview process (by invitation only).

Application Process

  1. All applicants must first file an application through PharmCAS, a web-based Pharmacy College Application Service, by February 1, at http://www.PharmCAS.org. PharmCAS must receive ALL official college transcripts by February 1. PharmCAS will not release applicant information to the School of Pharmacy until all transcripts, from every institution attended, are received.

  2. Three letters of reference should be completed on the "Letters of Reference" form included in your PharmCAS application and submitted to PharmCAS by February 1. Applicants must adhere to the specified requirements regarding letters of reference criteria:

  • One letter must be from a Pharmacist or other licensed health care professional

  • One letter must be from a Pre-health/faculty advisor*

  • The final letter should come from a Science Professor, Supervisor**, Math Professor, Employer**, Committee letter***, or a professor in any discipline.

  • Register to take the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT) at http://www.pcatweb.info. Select to have the scores sent directly to PharmCAS CODE 104. You must take the PCAT exam no later than the October testing date for the results to be submitted in time for review.

  • Complete the Supplemental Application (available through download from the CSU-COP website) and return it to the Chicago State University College of Pharmacy Student Affairs 9501 S. King Drive Douglas Hall 206, Chicago, IL., 60628 by March 1. Information and supplemental application can be downloaded at www.csu.edu/collegeofpharmacy/application.htm

Include the following items:

  • Completed Pre-pharmacy Prerequisite Checklist: You must account for all prerequisite courses by listing completed, in progress, and planned coursework.

  • Complete the Pre-Pharmacy Prerequisite Coursework Worksheet.

  • If applicable, submit copy of Advanced Placement (AP) Credits issued from the College Board and Educational Testing Services (ETS).

  • $50.00 Non-Refundable Application Fee. Check or Money Order made payable to Chicago State University (Temporary checks will not be accepted).

If an applicant completed coursework at a foreign institution, he/she must also submit an official, detailed course-by-course evaluation of this coursework. The student must obtain this evaluation from one of the following services:

  • Education Credential Evaluators (ECE): 414/964-0477

  • Josef Silny & Assoc. International Education Consultants: 305/666-0233

  • World Education Service (WES): 212/966-6311

All required (prerequisite) courses must be completed with a letter of grade of "C" or better prior to entrance into the professional pharmacy program. Grades of C- or less are not acceptable.

Selected applicants will be invited to participate in an interview process (Date and Time TBA).

If you have additional questions, please call our office at 773/821-2500.

* If out of school for more than three years, this letter may be substituted by a committee, supervisor or an employer.

** The supervisor/employer must have supervised/employed the applicant for a minimum of one year.

*** Can be substituted for a pre-health advisor or science professor if the committee contains a science professor who has taught the applicant and the science professor must be identified.

After the College of Pharmacy receives and processes the completed application, the application/file is evaluated to determine whether or not the student will be offered an on-campus interview.

GPA Calculations

To calculate a prospective student’s grade point average (GPAs), the College of Pharmacy uses grades from all nonremedial courses completed post-high school. If a student repeats a course, the College uses all grades earned in the GPA calculation. (Note: Students may repeat courses at different colleges; however, the course descriptions/syllabi must be the same.)

Technical Standards for Admission

The educational mission of the CSU–COP is to educate and graduate competent pharmacists who will provide patient-centered care in a variety of pharmacy practice settings. The technical standards for admission set forth by the CSU-COP outline the nonacademic abilities considered essential for students to achieve the level of competence required by the faculty and by the ACPE, the pharmacy-accrediting agency, in order to obtain the Pharm.D. Degree.

It is expected that all students admitted to this program will:

  1. Possess the coordination, motor and visual skills required to function in a clinical and laboratory setting where they will engage in pharmaceutical preparations and use instrumentation such as microscopes and balances;

  2. Possess sufficient visual and auditory perception and the mental capacity to assimilate technically detailed and complex information presented in lectures and in professional practice settings;

  3. Possess sufficient communication skills to present information accurately and effectively to faculty and patients.

Candidates for admission to the CSU–COP who are invited for an on-campus interview are required to certify that they understand and meet the technical standards detailed above. Candidates must provide such certification on the day of their interview. Candidates who may not meet the technical standards are encouraged to contact the COP Office of the Dean to discuss and identify what accommodations, if any, the CSU–COP would need to make in order that the candidate might be able to meet the standards.

Interview

The COP Office of the Dean coordinates the interview process with interviews occurring throughout the selection process.

The COP Admissions Committee reviews a prospective student’s completed file to determine the student’s interview eligibility. If they consider the student eligible for an interview, an invitation for an on-campus interview will be extended to the applicant.

Reapplication Process

After receiving either a denial or end-of-cycle letter, a prospective student may reapply to the CSU–COP in the next admissions cycle. Before reapplying, however, the student should seek the advice of the CSU–COP Assistant Dean for Student Affairs.

To initiate the reapplication process, the student must submit a new application. The application is then processed in the same manner as any other application.

Transfer Admission from Another College of Pharmacy

The CSU–COP may accept transfer students from other accredited pharmacy colleges and schools as long as these students are in good academic standing and have legitimate reasons for seeking a transfer.

All requests for transfer information should be referred to the CSU-COP Office of the Dean so that the potential transfer applicant can be counseled prior to submitting an application.

To be considered for transfer, a student must meet the College’s general requirements for admission. He/she must also submit the following:

  1. A letter to the CSU-COP Office of the Dean indicating why he/she wishes to transfer and explaining any difficulties encountered at his/her current institution;

  2. Official transcripts from all schools attended - undergraduate, graduate, and professional;

  3. A catalog and a detailed syllabus for any courses for which advanced standing consideration is requested;

  4. A letter from the dean of the pharmacy college or school in which the student is enrolled. The letter must indicate the student’s current academic status and/or terms of withdrawal/dismissal;

  5. Additional documents or letters of recommendation as determined necessary by the Dean of the CSU–COP.

If the review is positive, the Dean will instruct the Admissions Committee to interview the transfer student applicant. The Admissions Committee will provide its recommendation for admission to the Dean.

Readmission after Dismissal for Poor Academic Performance

Students dismissed for poor academic performance may reapply for admission to the CSU–COP if they:

  1. Complete at least two semesters of full-time study (i.e., at least 15 credit hours per semester) of a curriculum at the pre-pharmacy level or higher;

  2. Earn at least C (not C–) grades in all courses taken; and

  3. Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or greater.

In addition, prior to enrolling in this curriculum, students must seek academic counseling from the CSU–COP Dean’s Office, which can supply a list of sample courses.

Students fulfilling these requirements will be permitted to reapply to the University and College and will be treated as new applicants. The CSU-COP Admissions Committee will review the application for evidence of improved academic potential.

No guarantee of admission is implied, and questions related to advanced standing and similar issues will be addressed as they are for any new applicant. The recommendation of the Admissions Committee will be forwarded to the Office of the Dean. Readmission can be granted only once.

Advanced Standing

All requests for advanced standing by newly admitted, transfer, readmitted, or enrolled students are processed on a course-by-course basis. Advanced standing will be considered for coursework taken in which a letter grade of C or better has been achieved. To request such consideration, a student should submit a letter of request to the Office of the Dean, CSU–COP in which the student lists a course(s) previously taken, which might be similar in content to a professional course(s) that he/she is scheduled to take. Additionally, the student is advised to provide an official course description(s) and a syllabus (syllabi) of the course(s) previously taken. All requests must be submitted prior to the start of the course being considered. The materials will be forwarded to the appropriate course coordinators who will provide a recommendation to the CSU–COP Dean. The Dean will either grant or deny advanced standing. 

Matriculation Process

The matriculation process begins after a student receives notification of his/her acceptance. The student must return his/her signed matriculation agreement. The student must also:

  1. Submit a non-refundable deposit totaling $500 by the dates designated in the matriculation agreement. The entire $500 is applied toward the student’s first semester’s tuition if applicant enrolls;

  2. Submit an official copy of all college transcript(s) verifying that the student has satisfactorily completed all prerequisite course requirements for admission;

  3. Complete a medical file that includes proof of immunization against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis. Proof of immunity must be provided for measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, and hepatitis B. Evidence of a recent (within three months) negative tuberculin test is also required;

  4. Submit proof of medical insurance coverage or enroll in plan offered by CSU. Non-U.S. citizens/nonpermanent residents must provide documentation prior to enrollment verifying that sufficient funds have been deposited in a U.S. bank to cover all expenses while attending CSU–COP;

  5. Successfully pass a criminal background check and drug screen;

  6. Be eligible for licensure as a pharmacy technician in the State of Illinois; and

  7. Submit additional documents as requested by the Office of the Dean.

If a student either fails to satisfy the above matriculation requirements or omits/falsifies information required on official admissions documents, the student automatically forfeits his/her seat at CSU–COP.

CSU-COP Professional Curriculum

 

Course Title

Credits

Fall P-1

6110

Pharmacy Physiology

5

6111

Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms I – Non-solid Dosage Forms

3

6113

Pharmaceutical Biochemistry I - Macromolecules and Metabolism

3

6120

Introduction to Pharmacy and Health Care Systems

3

6121

Professional Practice I – Introduction to Pharmacy Practice

3 (17)

Spring P-1

6114

Pharmaceutical Biochemistry II - Molecular Biology and Pharmacogenetics

3

6112

Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms II – Solid Dosage Forms

3

6115

Microbiology and Immunology

4

 

6123

Research Methods and Pharmacoepidemiology

3

6124

Patient Assessment

2

6122

Professional Practice II - Public Health and Wellness

2 (17)

Fall P-2

6213

Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms III - Sterile Products

2

6211

Principles of Pharmacokinetics

3

6222

Literature Evaluation and Evidence Based Medicine

2

6231

Drug Action, Structure, and Therapeutics I - Introduction

3

6232

Drug Action, Structure, and Therapeutics II – Nutrition, ANS, and Cardiovascular I

4

6225

Applied Patient Care I

3 (17)

Intersession P-2

6223

Professional Practice III - Institutional Orientation

1 (1)

Spring P-2

6227

Pharmacy Law and Ethics

3

6226

Applied Patient Care II

3

6233

Drug Action, Structure, and Therapeutics III – Cardiovascular II and Renal

4

6234

Drug Action, Structure, and Therapeutics IV – Endocrine, Pulmonary, and Genitourinary

4

6224

Professional Practice IV - Institutional

2

65XX

Professional Electives

2 (18)

Fall P-3

6321

Pharmacy Practice Management

3

6335

Drug Action, Structure, and Therapeutics V – Gastrointestinal, Immunological, and CNS I

4

6336

Drug Action, Structure, and Therapeutics VI - CNS II and Acute Care

4

6322

Disease and Medication Therapy Management I

3

65XX

Professional Electives

2-4
(16-18)

Spring P-3

6324

Health Economics and Drug Treatment Outcomes

2

6323

Disease and Medication Therapy Management II

2

6326

Complementary Medicine

2

6337

Drug Action, Structure, and Therapeutics VII – Infectious Disease

4

6338

Drug Action, Structure, and Therapeutics VIII – Virology, Oncology, and Toxicology

4

6325

Professional Practice V – Applied Practice Skills

1

65XX

Professional Electives

2-4
(17-19)

Summer P-4

6421

Introduction to Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

1

64XX

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

5 (6)

Fall P-4

64XX

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

5

64XX

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

5

64XX

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

5 (15)

Spring P-4

64XX

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

5

64XX

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

5

64XX

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

5 (15)

Professional Electives

During their years of study at the CSU–COP, students complete a minimum total of 8 hours of elective credit.

Professional Practice Experiences

Students must successfully complete 41 credit hours of practical experience during the academic program. Students are required to complete introductory pharmacy practice experiences during the first through third professional years and advanced pharmacy practice experiences during the fourth professional year. During these experiences, students will spend time in a variety of pharmacy practice settings to develop the necessary skills for contemporary pharmacy practice.

The CSU–COP reserves the right to alter its curriculum, however, and whenever it deems appropriate.

Enrollment Status

Full time enrollment is required of all students in the College. Enrollment begins in the Fall semester only. It is not possible to begin the program in the Spring semester.

Graduation Requirements

To qualify for graduation, a student must:

  1. Successfully complete a minimum 62 semester hours credit of prerequisite coursework, as stipulated, for admission to the program;

  2. Successfully complete the program of professional and experiential coursework as approved by the CSU–COP Faculty and Dean;

  3. Attain a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 (C) for all professional coursework at the CSU–COP;

  4. Complete, at a minimum, the last two didactic semesters and all advanced pharmacy practice experiences at the CSU–COP;

  5. Settle all financial accounts with the institution; and

  6. Attend the commencement exercises for conferral of the degree unless excused by the Dean, CSU–COP.

Candidates for graduation must be of good moral character consistent with the requirements of the pharmacy profession and the CSU–COP faculty. It is the position of the faculty that anyone who illegally uses, possesses, distributes, sells, or is under the unlawful influence of narcotics, dangerous drugs, or controlled substances, or who abuses alcohol or is involved in any conduct involving moral turpitude, fails to meet the ethical and moral requirements of the profession and may be dismissed from any program or denied the awarding of any degree from CSU–COP.

Dean’s List

Following each semester, Dean’s List recognition will be provided to all students in the College who achieved a GPA of 3.50 or better for the term.

Graduation Honors

Graduation honors are awarded to candidates for the Doctor of Pharmacy degree who have distinguished themselves by virtue of high academic achievement while enrolled in the College. Only grades of courses taken at the College will be included in determining graduation honors. Degrees with honor are awarded based on the level of academic achievement (cumulative GPA) as follows: 

Summa cum laude

3.90 – 4.00

Magna cum laude

3.75 – 3.89

Cum laude

3.50 – 3.74

Student Awards

A number of awards that are sponsored by the CSU-COP, professional pharmacy organizations, pharmaceutical companies, and other will be presented each year at the graduation banquet. For a complete listing of these awards, contact the Office of the Dean.

Scholarships

A number of scholarships are available for students in any professional year. For a complete listing of the available scholarships, contact the Office of the Dean.

Grades

The following includes all grades, grading options, numerical equivalents, and corresponding definitions that may be issued in courses taken at the CSU-COP:

A

4

Excellent

B

3

Good

C

2

Fair

D

1

Poor

F

0

Failure

P

0

Pass

W/P

0

Withdraw/Passing

W/F

0

Withdraw/Failing

W/A

0

Withdraw/Student Attended One Class Session

W/N

0

Withdraw/Student Never Attended

I

0

Incomplete

X

0

No Grade Issued

I/F

0

Missed Incomplete Deadline

The CSU–COP students will be subject to the CSU-COP policies regarding academic monitoring, standing, and probation. All students will be given a copy of these guidelines and regulations upon entry into the program.

Credits, Quality Points, and GPA

Courses will be recorded in terms of semester hour(s) of credit. One semester hour of credit is equivalent to one hour a week of lecture throughout the semester. In laboratory courses, however, a ratio of three to five hours of laboratory work a week per credit prevails in different departments. In case discussion, workshop, or recitation, a ratio of two to three hours of meeting time a week per credit holds.

Multiplication of the credits for a course with the numerical value for the grade awarded gives the number of quality points earned for a course. Dividing the total number of quality points earned in courses by the total number of credits in those courses gives the grade point average.

Grades reported as W and P are recorded on a student's permanent record, but are not used in the calculation of a student's grade point average. Similarly, a grade of I may be assigned and is used only when special/extenuating circumstances exist (i.e., prolonged illness, family crisis, etc.), which prevent a student from completing the necessary course requirements on time in order to receive a grade. Under such circumstances, the student is responsible for providing the department with a written request notifying the department of the circumstances, documenting the problem(s), and asking for authorization to extend the period allotted to complete the unfinished coursework.

Any request for an extension to complete required course or rotation requirements must be approved by the course coordinator, department chair and the Assistant Dean. Unless otherwise specified, a grade of I must be resolved within 10 days from the end of the semester or rotation or the incomplete grade is automatically converted into a grade of F, which signifies failure of the course. It is the responsibility of the student when receiving an incomplete grade to complete all of the course requirements within this period, unless otherwise specified.

Please refer to the College of Pharmacy Student Handbook for policies of the College related to D and F grades received.

A student's academic standing will be determined on the basis of his/her GPA. Inclusion on the Dean's List, honors at graduation, placement on probation, and dismissal depend directly on the GPA.

College’s Policy on Student Employment

Upon acceptance to the professional program of CSU–COP, students are expected to devote their entire efforts to the academic curriculum. The College actively discourages employment that will conflict with the student’s ability to perform while courses and professional practice experiences are in session, and will not take outside employment or activities into consideration when scheduling classes, examinations, reviews, field trips, or professional practice experiences.

Student Grievance Policy

The purpose of the College of Pharmacy grievance procedure is to provide students with a fair method of resolving conflicts with faculty, staff, administrators and other students.

Any student or group of students may initiate a complaint procedure on any student concern including complaints against faculty, staff, administrators, or other students. Complaints involving violations of FERPA should be directed to the Office of the Registrar. Complaints involving harassment should be directed to the CSU Equal Employment Opportunity officer.

Complaints concerning a faculty member should be handled in the following manner:

Step One

Arrange a meeting with the faculty member to discuss the concern within ten (10) calendar days of the dispute. If resolution is not achieved at this level, see Step Two.

Step Two

Arrange a meeting with the appropriate Department Chair within ten (10) calendar days after meeting with the faculty member. The Chair of Pharmaceutical Sciences and/or the Chair of Pharmacy Practice may elect to include the course instructor(s) or coordinator in the discussion. If resolution is not achieved at this level, see Step Three.

Step Three

At this level students must submit in writing the formal complaint to the Office of the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs in the College of Pharmacy. The complaint must describe the problem, be accompanied by any relevant data and include the resolution sought. The statement must be specific and must be signed by the person submitting the complaint. In the case of a group complaint, one person may be designated as a representative for the group. The representative may sign for the group provided that all names of the group are attached. Students should be aware that the appropriate faculty members or administrators may be consulted and/or included in the process. The Assistant Dean will notify the Chair of the Grievance Committee, who will convene a meeting to hear the complaint per Grievance Committee policy and procedures. All Grievance Committee recommendations are forwarded to the Dean. The Dean will make the final decision. The Dean’s decision is final .

Complaints against staff and administrators should be handled in the following manner:

Step One

Arrange a meeting with the staff member or administrator to discuss the concern within ten (10) calendar days of the incident. If resolution is not achieved at this level see Step Two.

Step Two

Arrange a meeting with the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs in the College of Pharmacy within ten (10) calendar days after meeting with the staff member or administrator. The student should be aware that the parties involved may be included in the process. The Assistant Dean will address these concerns and will make recommendations to the Dean. The Dean will make the final decision. The Dean’s decision is final.

Complaints against students should be handled in the following manner:

Arrange a meeting with the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs in the College of Pharmacy and the student(s) to discuss the concerns within ten (10) calendar days of the incident. The Assistant Dean will address these concerns and will consult with the Dean when appropriate. The Dean’s decision is final.

Students with other concerns should arrange to meet with the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs in the College of Pharmacy.

A chronological record of student complaints related to matters covered by the ACPE accreditation standards will be maintained by the Office of the Dean and the file will be available during ACPE on-site accreditation evaluations.

Unresolved, student complaints related to accreditation standards should be directed to the Accreditation Council for Pharmaceutical Education (ACPE) 20 North Clark Street, Suite 2500, Chicago, Illinois 60602, (312) 664-3575, (800) 533-3606, Fax (312) 664-4652; http://www.acpe-accredit.org .

Departments

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Professors: Adesuyi Ajayi, M.D., Ph.D.

Associate Professors: Nadeem Fazal, M.D., Ph.D., Elmer J. Gentry, Ph.D., Chair, Mohammad Newaz, M.D., Ph.D.

Assistant Professors: Ehab Abourashed, Ph.D., Abir El-Alfy, Ph.D., Melany Puglisi-Weening, Ph.D.

Instructors: Seth Mahler, BS Pharm.

The Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences is composed of faculty from a number of specialty areas including: Basic Biomedical Sciences, Pharmaceutics/Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacology/Toxicology, and Medicinal Chemistry/Pharmacognosy.

Biomedical Sciences including physiology, biochemistry, microbiology and immunology provide the foundational knowledge for pharmacy education.

Pharmaceutics is the discipline dealing with the design of various dosage forms for delivery of drugs, determination of drug stability, and the art of contemporary compounding.

Pharmacokinetics is the discipline involved with the evaluation of the effects of route of administration and formulation on the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) of drugs.

Pharmacology is the discipline that studies the interaction of organisms and substances that alter normal biochemical and physiological function. More specifically, it is the study of drugs and the mechanism of how they interact with biological systems to affect function.

Toxicology is the study of the adverse effect of substances, such as drugs or environmental pollutants, on living organisms. As related to pharmacy, it is the study of how elevated doses of drugs produce toxic effects.

Medicinal Chemistry is the discipline at the interface of chemistry and pharmacology involved with synthesis and design of new drug compounds. It also involves the study of structure-activity relationships (SAR) and ADME characteristics of drugs in order to optimize their properties through chemical manipulation.

Pharmacognosy is the study of the physical, chemical, biochemical and biological properties of drugs or potential drugs of natural origin. It also studies the discovery of potential drugs from animal, plant, and microbial sources.

Departmental Mission 

The mission of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences is to educate students with the foundation of scientific knowledge essential to the professional pharmacy curriculum. While providing quality instruction in the biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences, the faculty will introduce and develop skills of critical thinking, problem solving and life-long learning in student pharmacist. In addition, the department will provide opportunities for further development of faculty and student pharmacists by encouraging them to strive for excellence in scientific inquiry. The Department also endeavors to contribute significantly to the service mission of Chicago State University College of Pharmacy.

Department of Pharmacy Practice

Professors:

Associate Professors: Deborah Harper-Brown, Pharm.D., Miriam A. Mobley Smith, Pharm.D., Dolores Nobles-Knight, Pharm.D., MPH, Chair

Assistant Professors: Sneha Baxi, Pharm.D., Michael T. Ellison, Ed.D., John Esterly, Pharm.D., Yolanda Hardy, Pharm.D., Sabah Hussein, Pharm.D., Diana Jason, Pharm.D., Antoine Jenkins, Pharm.D., BCPS, Charisse Johnson, Pharm.D., M.S., Colleen Lauster, Pharm.D., CDE, Janene Marshall, Pharm.D., Kumar Mukherjee, Ph.D., Angela Riley, Pharm.D., Joseph Slonek, Ph.D.

Instructors: Jay Bogdan, Pharm.D., J.D., Don Brower, BS Pharm.

The Department of Pharmacy Practice is comprised of faculty who provide education in the administrative and clinical sciences, as well as direct practice experience. Required courses in the administrative science area include an introduction to career development and current pharmacy topics, a survey of the health care system, professional practice management, and pharmacy law and ethics. Required courses in the clinical science area include topics in the area of nonprescription medications, drug literature evaluation, pharmacotherapeutics, and a professional practice laboratory that emphasizes communication skills, prescription processing, and pharmaceutical care. Supervised practice experiences required during the program provide opportunities for students to apply knowledge acquired in didactic courses to practical application. These experiences promote the development of technical, cognitive, and decision-making skills that are necessary for the contemporary practice of pharmacy in a variety of practice environments. Various states apply these experiences to their state board of pharmacy internship requirements.

Departmental Mission

The mission of the Department of Pharmacy Practice is to prepare and empower pharmacy students and pharmacists to become competent providers of pharmacist care in all practice settings. This mission is achieved through a combination of innovative didactic coursework, experiential training, mentoring, scholarship, and community service in partnership with students, pharmacy practitioners and other health care providers and our communities. The Department serves the professional community through the development and evaluation of innovative pharmacy practice models that promote the role of the pharmacist as an integral member of the healthcare team.

Pharmacy (PHAR) Course Descriptions

To enroll in any course in the College of Pharmacy, a student must be accepted into the College.

PHAR 6110 – PHARMACY PHYSIOLOGY (5)

Fundamental principles of normal physiological function of the human body for the pharmacy student. Topics include all major organ systems and will include the relationship between anatomy and physiology, as well as, allow for interpretation of pathophysiological states.

PHAR 6111 – PHARMACEUTICAL DOSAGE FORMS I-NON-SOLID DOSAGE FORMS, LECTURE AND LABORATORY (3)

Physiochemical properties for the formulation, preparation, stability, and performance of non-solid pharmaceutical dosage forms. The mathematical calculations for the dosage forms will also be incorporated into the lecture and laboratory sessions. A weekly laboratory session allows for application of pharmaceutical properties and calculations to pharmaceutical compounding.

PHAR 6112 – PHARMACEUTICAL DOSAGE FORMS II-SOLID DOSAGE FORMS, LECTURE AND LABORATORY (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of PHAR 6111 or consent of instructor.

Physiochemical properties for the formulation, preparation, stability, and performance of solid pharmaceutical dosage forms. The mathematical calculations for the dosage forms will also be incorporated into the lecture and laboratory sessions. A weekly laboratory session allows for application of pharmaceutical properties and calculations to pharmaceutical compounding.

PHAR 6113 – PHARMACEUTICAL BIOCHEMISTRY I-MACROMOLECULES AND METABOLISM (3)

Structure/function relationship for biologically important molecules. Topics include anabolic and catabolic pathways of human metabolism for proteins/carbohydrates/lipids as well as the function of those macromolecules in normal and abnormal physiological function.

PHAR 6114 – PHARMACEUTICAL BIOCHEMISTRY II-MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND PHARMACOGENETICS (3)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6113 or consent of instructor.

A continuation of PHAR 6113 with focus on basic genetics, regulation of metabolic function, and principles of gene expression. The application of genetic principles to pathophysiological states and medication use will also be discussed.

PHAR 6115 – MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY, LECTURE AND LABORATORY (4)

Fundamental principles of clinical microbiology with emphasis on prevention, control, and rational management of pathogenic organisms. Additionally covers basic principles of immunology including: cells and organs of the immune system, activation of the immune system, and the role of the immune system in response to infectious disease. Other topics include organ transplant, autoimmunity, immune suppression, and hypersensitivity.

PHAR 6120-INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACY AND HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS (3)

Structure and composition of the United States health care delivery system. Political and economic issues are introduced and their implications for the practice of pharmacy. The history of pharmacy, its role in the health care system, and interactions with other health care professionals is discussed.

PHAR 6121-PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE I-INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACY PRACTICE, LECTURE AND COMMUNITY PHARMACY PRACTICUM (3)

Factors that influence contemporary pharmacy practice, roles, responsibilities and expectations are explored. Includes medical terminology and commonly prescribed drugs dispensed in a community pharmacy practice setting. A four (4) hour weekly introductory pharmacy practice experience in a community pharmacy allows for application of principles.

PHAR 6122 – PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE II-PUBLIC HEALTH: POLICY, PREVENTION AND WELLNESS; LECTURE AND PRACTICUM (2)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6121 or consent of instructor.

Principles of the United States public health system for the pharmacist. Focus on public health policy, health promotion and disease prevention initiatives. Population-specific applications, quality improvement strategies and research processes utilized to identify and solve public health problems are discussed. A four (4) hour weekly service-learning practicum in a community-based public health services center allows for application of principles.

PHAR 6123 – RESEARCH METHODS AND PHARMACOEPIDEMIOLOGY (3)

Introduction to the statistical concepts and methods utilized when applying statistics to health and pharmacy-related decision-making and patient care. Application of principles of epidemiology to the study of drug use and outcomes in large populations included. Common methods of conducting epidemiologic research in pharmacy practice will be covered.

PHAR 6124 – PATIENT ASSESSMENT, LECTURE AND LABORATORY (2)

Introduction to concepts and skills used by pharmacists to provide patient-centered care. Patient interviewing, medication history taking, triage, critical thinking and physical assessment technique development are included. The application of these skills in pharmacy practice settings is emphasized and reinforced in laboratory sessions.

PHAR 6211 – PRINCIPLES OF PHARMACOKINETICS, LECTURE AND WORKSHOP (3)

Principles of biopharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics including calculation and interpretation of kinetic data. Additional topics include factors that determine drug disposition, design and adjustment of dosing regimens, and prediction of drug interactions.

PHAR 6213 - PHARMACEUTICAL DOSAGE FORMS III-STERILE PRODUCTS, LECTURE AND LABORATORY (2)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6112 or consent of instructor.

Physiochemical properties for the formulation, preparation, stability, and performance of sterile dosage forms. The mathematical calculations for the dosage forms will also be incorporated into the lecture and laboratory sessions. A weekly laboratory session allows for application of pharmaceutical properties and calculations to sterile product preparation.

PHAR 6222 – LITERATURE EVALUATION AND EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE (2)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6123 or consent of instructor.

Overview of drug information resources and systematic approaches for critical evaluation of the medical literature. Problem-based learning strategies will be utilized to assist in combining clinical expertise, patient characteristics and medical evidence for clinical decision-making and effective communication of information.

PHAR 6223 – PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE III-INSTITUTIONAL ORIENTATION, LECTURE AND PRACTICUM (1)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6122 or consent of instructor.

Orientation to introductory pharmacy practice experience in an institutional pharmacy setting allows for application of principles.

PHAR 6224 – PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE IV-INSTITUTIONAL, LECTURE AND PRACTICUM (2)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6223 or consent of instructor.

Exploration of medication use processes in institutional pharmacy practice settings. Technology, patient safety principles, pharmaceutical compounding (sterile and non-sterile), operational issues and formulary management are emphasized. An eight (8) hour weekly introductory pharmacy practice experience in an institutional pharmacy setting allows for application of principles. 

PHAR 6225 – APPLIED PATIENT CARE I, LECTURE AND LABORATORY (3)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6121, PHAR 6122 and second-year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program or consent of instructor.

Application of patient and health professional behavioral science principles, social issues and patient-centered pharmacy care principles, pharmaceutical knowledge and effective professional communication. Laboratory sessions will focus on immunization certification and delivery, basic life support certification, medical chart review, patient interviewing, medication therapy problem solving, devices and OTC product selection. Issues related to cultural competency are included.

PHAR 6226 – APPLIED PATIENT CARE II, LECTURE AND LABORATORY (3)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6121, PHAR 6122, PHAR 6225 and second-year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program or consent of instructor.

Application of patient-centered pharmacy care principles, pharmaceutical knowledge and effective professional communication techniques to solve prescription problems and provide drug therapy management in ambulatory pharmacy environments. Laboratory sessions will focus on medication dispensing (prescription and OTC), patient counseling, medical chart review, medication-related problem solving, medication dosage forms, health professional communications, medication error prevention and administration.

PHAR 6227 – PHARMACY LAW AND ETHICS (3)

Prerequisite – Second-year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program or consent of instructor.

Federal and state statutes and regulations pertaining to the practice of pharmacy, licensing of pharmacists and supportive personnel, and drug distribution. Case law, standards of care and the ethical dilemmas encountered during the provision of care in a variety of patient populations are included. Issues relative to business activities and professional ethics are also covered.

PHAR 6231 – DRUG ACTION, STRUCTURE, AND THERAPEUTICS I-INTRODUCTION, LECTURE AND WORKSHOP (3)

Integrated pharmacy curriculum for disciplines of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and therapeutics. Introduction to pathology and disease states, ADME principles and drug design, receptor theory and signaling mechanisms, and logical patient evaluation.

PHAR 6232 – DRUG ACTION, STRUCTURE, AND THERAPEUTICS II-NUTRITION, ANS, AND CARDIOVASCULAR AND RENAL I, LECTURE AND WORKSHOP (4)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6231 or consent of DAST coordinator.

Continuation of integrated pharmacy curriculum for disciplines of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and therapeutics. Focus on patient nutrition/fluid/electrolyte requirements, autonomic nervous system, and therapy for cardiovascular and renal disorders.

PHAR 6233 - DRUG ACTION, STRUCTURE, AND THERAPEUTICS III-CARDIOVASCULAR AND RENAL II, LECTURE AND WORKSHOP (4)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6232 or consent of DAST coordinator.

Continuation of integrated pharmacy curriculum for disciplines of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and therapeutics. Completion of therapy for cardiovascular and renal disorders.

PHAR 6234 - DRUG ACTION, STRUCTURE, AND THERAPEUTICS IV-ENDOCRINE, PULMONARY, AND GENITOURINARY, LECTURE AND WORKSHOP (4)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6233 or consent of DAST coordinator.

Continuation of integrated pharmacy curriculum for disciplines of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and therapeutics. Focus on therapy of endocrine, pulmonary, and genitourinary disorders.

PHAR 6321 – PHARMACY PRACTICE MANAGEMENT (3)

Prerequisite – Third-year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program or consent of instructor.

Introduction of pharmacy operations management, pharmacy financial resources oversight, personnel management and human resources, medication-use process management, compensation mechanisms for pharmacy services, medication safety initiatives, error prevention strategies, developing and marketing of services, innovative services provision and related issues in professional pharmacy practice.

PHAR 6322 – DISEASE AND MEDICATION THERAPY MANAGEMENT I, LECTURE AND WORKSHOP (3)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6231, PHAR 6232, PHAR 6233, PHAR 6234 and third-year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program or consent of instructor.

Management of major disease states and medication therapy. Application of knowledge and skills in the following areas will be emphasized: patient interviewing, information gathering, drug therapy planning and problem solving, therapeutic monitoring, therapeutic interventions, and documentation. Workshop sessions will focus on knowledge reinforcement in addition to physical assessment, patient counseling, clinical services reimbursement, and health care provider communication (written and oral) activities.

PHAR 6323 – DISEASE AND MEDICATION THERAPY MANAGEMENT II, LECTURE AND WORKSHOP (2)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6322 and third-year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program or consent of instructor.

Management of major disease states and medication therapy with an emphasis on special populations. Application of knowledge and skills in the following areas will be emphasized: patient interviewing, information gathering, drug therapy planning and problem solving, therapeutic monitoring, therapeutic interventions, and documentation. Workshop sessions will focus on knowledge reinforcement in addition to physical assessment, patient counseling, clinical services reimbursement, and health care provider communications (written and oral) activities. Issues related to cultural competency are included.

PHAR 6324 – HEALTH ECONOMICS AND DRUG TREATMENT OUTCOMES (2)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6123 and third-year standing in the Doctor of Pharmacy program or consent of instructor.

Basic and applied economic theory and principles, pharmacoeconomic analysis of the cost of drug therapy to health care systems and society, and application of pharmacoeconomic research principles in the determination of alternatives producing the best health outcomes for invested resources. Issues related to formulary management, drug usage evaluation, adverse drug events, reimbursement models, and health care reform will also be included.

PHAR 6325 – PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE V-APPLIED PRACTICE SKILLS, WORKSHOP AND PRACTICUM (1)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6224 or consent of instructor.

Application of patient-centered pharmacy care principles, pharmaceutical knowledge and effective professional communication. The development of a comprehensive pharmaceutical care plan with an accompanying patient case presentation will be required. An eight (8) hour weekly intermediate pharmacy practice experience in a hospital, ambulatory care, community or home health pharmacy practice setting allows for application of principles. Participation in first and second professional-year student teaching will be assigned.

PHAR 6326 - COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE (2)

Overview of complementary and alternative medicine. Emphasis on herbals and other dietary supplements and their use in management of disease.

PHAR 6335 - DRUG ACTION, STRUCTURE, AND THERAPEUTICS V-GASTROINTESTINAL, IMMUNOLOGICAL, AND CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM I, LECTURE AND WORKSHOP (4)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6234 or consent of DAST coordinator.

Continuation of integrated pharmacy curriculum for disciplines of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and therapeutics. Focus on therapy of gastrointestinal, immunological, and central nervous system disorders.

PHAR 6336 - DRUG ACTION, STRUCTURE, AND THERAPEUTICS VI-CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM II AND ACUTE CARE, LECTURE AND WORKSHOP (4)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6335 or consent of DAST coordinator.

Continuation of integrated pharmacy curriculum for disciplines of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and therapeutics. Completion of therapy for central nervous system disorders and focus on substance abuse and management of critically ill patients.

PHAR 6337 - DRUG ACTION, STRUCTURE, AND THERAPEUTICS VII-INFECTIOUS DISEASE, LECTURE AND WORKSHOP (4)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6336 or consent of DAST coordinator.

Continuation of integrated pharmacy curriculum for disciplines of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and therapeutics. Focus on therapy of infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, protozoans, and helminths.

PHAR 6338 - DRUG ACTION, STRUCTURE, AND THERAPEUTICS VIII-VIROLOGY, ONCOLOGY, AND TOXICOLOGY, LECTURE AND WORKSHOP (4)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6337 or consent of DAST coordinator.

Continuation of integrated pharmacy curriculum for disciplines of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and therapeutics. Focus on infectious diseases caused by viruses, therapy of neoplastic diseases, and basic/clinical toxicology.

PHAR 6421 – INTRODUCTION TO ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (1)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6325 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Orientation and overview of expectations while completing the advanced pharmacy practice experiences. Required assignments, performance criteria/grading, preceptor/site evaluations, and other general guidelines will be emphasized during this one week orientation.

PHAR 6422 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (REQUIRED): AMBULATORY CARE (5)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Clinical pharmacy practice experience in an ambulatory care setting with application of patient interviewing, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills. The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking and communication is emphasized.

PHAR 6423 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (REQUIRED): COMMUNITY (5)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Clinical pharmacy practice experience in a community setting with application of patient interviewing, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills. The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking and communication is emphasized. 

PHAR 6424 –ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (REQUIRED): INSTITUTIONAL (5)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Clinical pharmacy practice experience in an institutional setting with application of patient interviewing, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills. The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking and communication is emphasized.

PHAR 6425 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (REQUIRED): GENERAL MEDICINE (5)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Clinical pharmacy practice experience in a general medicine setting with application of patient interviewing, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills. The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking and communication is emphasized.

PHAR 6426 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): ADVANCED AMBULATORY CARE (5)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Clinical pharmacy practice experience with additional exploration focusing on an ambulatory care setting with application of patient interviewing, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills. The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking and communication is emphasized.

PHAR 6427 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): ADVANCED COMMUNITY (5)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Clinical pharmacy practice experience with additional exploration focusing on a community setting with application of patient interviewing, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills. The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking and communication is emphasized.

PHAR 6428 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): ADVANCED MEDICINE (5)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Clinical pharmacy practice experience with additional exploration focusing on a general (or specialty) medicine setting with application of patient interviewing, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills. The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking and communication is emphasized.

PHAR 6429 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): CRITICAL CARE (5)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Clinical pharmacy practice experience with additional exploration focusing on a critical care setting with application of patient interviewing, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills. The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking and communication is emphasized.

PHAR 6430 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): DRUG INFORMATION (5)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Pharmacy practice experience in a drug information center. Providing written and verbal communication of drug information to healthcare professionals, patients, and the general public.

PHAR 6431 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): GERIATRICS (5)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Clinical pharmacy practice experience focusing on the geriatric patient population with application of patient interviewing, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills. The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking and communication is emphasized.

PHAR 6432 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): PHARMACOKINETICS (5)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Clinical pharmacy practice experience focusing on the pharmacokinetic monitoring of patients with application of patient interviewing, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills. The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking and communication is emphasized.

PHAR 6433 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): NUTRITION (5)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Clinical pharmacy practice experience focusing on nutrition with application of patient interviewing, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills. The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking and communication is emphasized.

PHAR 6434 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): PEDIATRICS (5)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Clinical pharmacy practice experience focusing on the pediatric patient population with application of patient interviewing, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills. The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking and communication is emphasized.

PHAR 6435 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): PSYCHIATRY (5)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Clinical pharmacy practice experience focusing on the psychiatric patient population with application of patient interviewing, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills. The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking and communication is emphasized.

PHAR 6436 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): SURGERY (5)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Clinical pharmacy practice experience focusing on the surgical patient population with application of patient interviewing, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills. The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking and communication is emphasized.

PHAR 6437 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): HOME HEALTH (5)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Clinical pharmacy practice experience focusing on the home health patient population with application of patient interviewing, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills. The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking and communication is emphasized.

PHAR 6438 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): ADVANCED SPECIALTY (5)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Pharmacy practice experience in a variety of settings such as an association, public health oriented site, or other health-care related entity.   The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking, and communication is emphasized.

PHAR 6439 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): ADMINISTRATIVE (5)

Prerequisite – Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Pharmacy practice experience with a focus on the management of a pharmacy within an institution or other practice setting, including supply procurement, human resource management, interdepartmental committees. The application of problem-solving, critical thinking and communication is emphasized.

6440 - ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): INDUSTRY/FIELD (5)

Prerequisites: Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourh professional year standing.  Other prerequisites may apply to specific field sites.

A pharmacy practice experience in a pharmaceutical industry setting.  Settings can include pharmaceutical manufacturers, pharmacy benefit managers (PBM), pharmacy consultants and related pharmacy settings.

PHAR 6441- ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): MAIL ORDER PHARMACY/FIELD (5)

Prerequisites: COmpletion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Clinical pharmacy practice experience with additonal exploration focusing on mail order pharmacy.  Focus on application of patient profile review, medication utilization, formulary review, assessment, and monitoring skills.  The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking, and communication is emphasized. 

PHAR 6442 - ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPEREINCE (ELECTIVE): RESEARCH/FIELD (5)

Prerequisites: Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.  Other prerequisites may apply based on the specific research focus.

A pharmacy practice expereince with emphasis on research.  Focus on development of skills to conduct bence, clinical, or community based research. 

PHAR 6443 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): REGULATORY/FIELD (5)

Prerequisites: Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.  Other prerequisites may apply based on site specific requirements.

A pharmacy practice experience in a pharmacy regulatory setting.  Settings to include: Food and Drug Administration (FDA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), State Boards of Pharmacy, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and other related settings.

PHAR 6444 - ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): ACADEMIA/FIELD (5)

Prerequisites: Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

A pharmacy practice experience in an academic setting.  An emphasis will be placed on curriculum, curricular design, teaching, assessment, and accreditation. 

PHAR 6445 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): VETERINARY/FIELD (5)

Prerequisites: Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing. 

Clinical pharmacy practice experience focusing on veterinary pharmacy.  Focus on application of patient profile review, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills.  The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking, and communication is emphasized. 

PHAR 6446 - ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCES (ELECTIVE): NUCLEAR PHARMACY/FIELD (5)

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Clinical pharmacy practice experience focusing on nuclear pharmacy.  Focus on application of patient profile review, medication utilization, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills.  The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking, and communication is emphasized. 

PHAR 6447 - ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): INFECTIOUS DISEASE/FIELD 5

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing.

Clinical pharmacy practice experience with additional exploration focusing on infections disease.  Focus on application of patient interviewing, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills.  The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking, and communication is emphasized. 

PHAR 6448 – ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE EXPERIENCE (ELECTIVE): ONCOLOGY/FIELD 5

Prerequisites: Completion of PHAR 6421 or consent of instructor and fourth professional year standing. 

Clinical pharmacy practice experience focusing on oncology.  Focus on application of patient profile review, patient interviewing, assessment, treatment plan development, and monitoring skills.  The integration of problem-solving, critical thinking, and communication is emphasized.

PHAR 6501/6502 - SPECIAL PROJECT/RESEARCH (VARIABLE)

Courses provide an opportunity for students to work with individual faculty mentors on projects of variable scope. Included activities could be library and/or laboratory and/or survey-type research. All special projects or research need to be approved by the appropriate department chair.

PHAR 6503 - COMMUNITY SERVICE (2)

Hands-on involvement in a community service project and discussion with community leaders, to better prepare to provide pharmaceutical care to a wider segment of the population. Includes development and implementation of a service project or participation in a project currently sponsored by the University. Permission of the Dean’s Office is required.

PHAR 6504 - CURRENT TOPICS IN HEALTH CARE (2)

Explores current topics in health care and examines their relationship and potential impact on pharmacy practice and education. The course will require students to review current news periodicals and Internet-based news sources. Cases will be assigned that require critical analysis and writing of executive summaries.

PHAR 6505 - DANGEROUS PLANTS AND ANIMALS (2)

Focuses on the recognition and identification of dangerous plants and animals found primarily, but not exclusively, in Illinois. The student will learn to assess poisoning situations and recommend management scenarios. Lectures and workshops involving case studies and field trips will be utilized.

PHAR 6506 - NEW DRUG PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT (2)

Discussion of current issues involved with drug discovery, development, and regulation. Topics to be discussed include the inclusion of women and children in clinical trials, regulation of dietary supplements and generic drugs, FDA approval of new drugs, RX to OTC switch, product labeling, and direct to consumer marketing.

PHAR 6507 - NOVEL DRUG DELIVERY (2)

Provides an understanding of novel ways of drug delivery for improved therapeutic effects. Contemporary delivery systems as well as those under advanced development will be discussed. Students will examine the rationale, design, and application of these novel delivery systems.

PHAR 6508 - MANAGEMENT OF CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS (2)

Designed to provide the student with skills for the management of critically ill patients. Expands on topics taught in the required courses. This course is directed toward the student seeking to pursue a general pharmacy practice and/or specialized residency program after graduation.

PHAR 6509 - ISSUES IN INFECTIOUS DISEASES (2)

Topics in infectious diseases that frequently are addressed in the lay press. Topics to be discussed may include: Bacterial resistance and the “Super Bugs”, Hepatitis, tropical diseases and travel medicine, drug resistant TB, animal/insect borne diseases and emerging viral and fungal pathogens. 

PHAR 6510 - SPORTS MEDICINE FOR THE PHARMACIST (2)

Introduces pharmacy students to the specialized applications of drugs used in competitive sports. The historical developments leading to present-day use of performance enhancing drugs will be introduced. The basic pharmacology and toxicology of all the categories of drugs (e.g. anabolic steroids, stimulants, etc.) banned by the major amateur athletic organizations will be discussed. Both nonprescription and prescription medicines will be discussed including the growing area of “nutritional supplements”.

PHAR 6511 - COMMUNITY PHARMACY MANAGEMENT (2)

Presented by members of upper management of community pharmacies. Addresses major aspects of the management of modern community pharmacies.

PHAR 6512 - MEDICAL SPANISH (2)

Provides the student with the communication skills necessary to provide care to the Spanish-speaking patient. At the end of this course, students will have an expanded Spanish vocabulary (selected nouns, verbs, adjectives, phrases etc.) plus items specifically related to the practice of pharmacy (i.e., parts of the body, drug formulations, selected disease conditions, etc.). Directed at students not fluent in Spanish.

PHAR 6513 - CONTEMPORARY COMPOUNDING, LECTURE AND LABORATORY (2)

Designed to expand the students’ expertise in the field of extemporaneous compounding. Students will learn practical aspects of compatibility and stability of compounded prescriptions and parenteral products.

PHAR 6514 - ISSUES IN AMBULATORY CARE (2)

Focus on the role of the pharmacist in the ambulatory care setting. Topics will include potential practice opportunities available and the documentation, reimbursement, justification, and marketing of the pharmacist’s services. In addition, the student will develop care plans, design outcomes research projects, and examine the importance of the multidisciplinary approach to patient care.

PHAR 6515 - SUBSTANCES OF ABUSE AND ADDICTION (2)

Provides an in-depth study of the neuropharmacology of substances of abuse including stimulants, depressants, hallucinogens, and inhalants. Designed to expand on information in required courses. Emphasis on basic pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms related to the effects of the individual substances of abuse. Current theories of addiction and tolerance will be presented. In addition, various treatments for dependence and detection methods as well as social, legal, and ethical aspects of substances of abuse will be considered.

PHAR 6516 - MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS (2)

Introduces the student to database applications and records management. It will include concepts and techniques for the systematic creation, storage, reproduction, distribution, and retention of records with emphasis on hands-on application of relational database management software, especially Microsoft Access for both desktop and CE versions for the handheld PC.

PHAR 6517 - CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY (2)

Designed to expand on required courses in clinical toxicology including the diagnosis and treatment of common poisonings. Emphasis will be given to the basic concepts of patient-oriented toxicology.

PHAR 6518 – GERIATRIC PHARMACOTHERAPY (2)

Reviews and expands on the physical changes that happen as aging occurs that may lead to different therapy choices in the elderly population as compared to younger adults. Emphasis on disease states and clinical situations more commonly seen in the elderly population such as osteoporosis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, etc.

PHAR 6519 - ADVANCED TOPICS IN WOMEN’S HEALTH (2)

Designed to build upon the student’s basic knowledge of reproductive physiology. Explores the uniqueness of the female gender on the physiology of normal function, pathophysiology and treatment of dysfunction. Integrates various areas of basic science (physiology, pharmacology, pathology, etc.) with clinical sciences.

PHAR 6520 - PHARMACY-BASED HEALTH SCREENINGS, LECTURE AND LABORATORY (2)

Prepares participants to develop health-screening programs in a variety of pharmacy practice settings. The focus is risk factor assessment and hands-on experience with technological devices related to cancer, cardiovascular disease (blood pressure and cholesterol), diabetes, and osteoporosis. Also addresses OSHA training, CLIA regulations, policies and procedures, and implementation of screening programs.

PHAR 6521 - ELEMENTS OF SUPERVISION (2)

Offers skills development in the supervision of employees (technicians, clerks, and other subordinates) through readings, written assignments and classroom seminar activities. Material will also be reviewed that provides tools for “managing the boss.”

PHAR 6522 – NATURAL PRODUCTS AND DRUG DISCOVERY (2)

Designed to expand on knowledge of natural products and their impact in discovery of lead compounds in drug discovery and development. Focus on isolation, purification, preclinical testing, and early clinical testing of past and current clinical candidates.

PHAR 6523 – ADVANCED TOPICS IN MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY (2)

Expands on medicinal chemistry topics presented in the required curriculum. Emphasis on recent advances and applications.

PHAR 6524 – ADVANCED TOPICS IN PHARMACOLOGY (2)

Expands on pharmacology topics presented in the required curriculum. Emphasis on recent advances and applications.

PHAR 6525 – ADVANCED TOPICS IN SOCIAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCES (2)

Expands on pharmacy administration topics presented in the required curriculum. Emphasis on recent advances and applications.

PHAR 6526 – HISTORY OF PHARMACY (2)

Provides opportunity to explore the historical development of the pharmacy profession. Emphasis on significant changes to profession in the United States.

PHAR 6527 POLICY AND ADVOCACY (1)

Prerequisite: PHAR 6122

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the process of crafting and evaluating health care policy, building upon concepts learned in Professional Practice II. The students will hear policy perspectives from legislators, lobbyists and representatives of professional organizations, and will learn to identify issues of concern to the profession, build position papers and legislative agendas, lobby for legislation supporting the profession and evaluate potential outcomes of health care policies.

6528 COMMUNITY EDUCATION PROGRAM (2)

During this course, students will develop, implement, and assess a culturally-appropriate community education program for South Suburban Chicago. They will conduct focus group interviews to determine the health and medication related topics of interest of community members; develop active learning sessions that will foster audience participation and understanding of concepts; formulate a marketing strategy to encourage attendance; provide the sessions at various locations including health centers, village halls, park district facilities, senior centers, churches, and schools; and measure the impact of the program.

6529 TOPICS IN HOSPITAL PHARMACY PRACTICE (2)

Intended to give students a broader overview of topics that are more specific to hospital pharmacy practice. The course involves some introductory lecture, then discussion, a group student investigative project, and student presentations on their findings.

6530 HOME INFUSION THERAPY (1)

This course is designed for the student to obtain in-depth knowledge about home health services and the pharmacist’s role in home infusion therapy. Students will learn through lectures and discussions about services that are available through home health agencies, the health care professionals involved in home health, and how home infusion therapy is provided, monitored and regulated.

6530 ADVANCED LITERATURE EVALUATION (1)

Prerequisite: PHAR 6531

Designed to familiarize students with study designs and statistical concepts commonly used to develop, select, deliver and evaluate patient-centered pharmacy services in medical literature. This course will allow students to improve their ability to interpret, assess, and communicate important elements and findings of studies/trials in the discussion format.

6523 CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY OF NATURAL PRODUCTS (2)

Discussion of natural products and herbal supplements, commonly used as drugs or are currently in development. Topics include the biosynthesis and biological activities of compounds isolated from plant, animal, and microbial sources.

6533 SELF-CARE COUNSELING & THERAPEUTICS (2)

Prerequisite: PHAR 6225

Designed to teach pharmacy students self-care, defined as “the action individuals take for themselves and their families to stay healthy and manage minor and chronic conditions based on their knowledge and the information available.” The purpose is to augment knowledge of over-the-counter medications and self-care.

6534 CARE OF THE GERIATRIC PATIENT (2)

Introduces and reinforces general principles pertaining to the care of the geriatric patient. The goal is to enhance the student pharmacist’s competence in caring for older adults. Topics will focus on the physiological, psychological, physical, ethical, social, economic and therapeutic issues of aging. Each lecture incorporates topics and activities pertinent to providing patient-centered care in the older adult populations. Instruction is provided through lecture, small group discussion, role-play, hands-on skill building activities, and actual patient care assignments.

6535 HEALTH PROMOTION INITIATIVES: DESIGN AND ASSESSMENT (2)

Prerequisite: PHAR 6122

Focuses on the design, implementation and evaluation of a health promotion initiative. students will be trained to evaluate the need, progress, outcome, and efficiency of a health promotion intervention. In this course, students will assess the needs of an intervention program, implement the intervention and evaluation the effect of the intervention.

6536 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH FOR PHARMACISTS (2)

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor

Intended for the student with a strong background in Spanish seeking to improve their conversational speaking and cultural competency skills related to interviewing and counseling Spanish speaking patients. The course incorporates a self study component to review grammar and medical words and phrases in Spanish. In-class activities include role playing, mock interviews, and case study discussions. 

6537 CURRENT TOPICS IN INFECTIOUS DISEASES (2)

Prerequisite: PHAR 6110 and 6115

A discussion-based elective course. Current topics in infectious diseases will be discussed as deemed useful for the pharmacy student. Topics include currently relevant bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic diseases..

6611 SPECIAL TOPICS FOR PHARMACY PROFESSIONAL YEAR ONE (VARIABLE)

Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean of the College of Pharmacy

A required course for students placed on academic probation by the College of Pharmacy Academic Standing Committee (COP-ASC) during the First Professional Year. The independent course of study and the credit hours of enrollment are determined by the COP-ASC based on the subject being remediated.

6612 SPECIAL TOPICS FOR PHARMACY PROFESSIONAL YEAR ONE (VARIABLE)

Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean of the College of Pharmacy

A required course for students placed on academic probation by the College of Pharmacy Academic Standing Committee (COP-ASC) during the First Professional Year. The independent course of study and the credit hours of enrollment are determined by the COP-ASC based on the subject being remediated.

6621 SPECIAL TOPICS FOR PHARMACY PROFESSIONAL YEAR 2 (VARIABLE)

Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean of the College of Pharmacy

A required course for students placed on academic probation by the College of Pharmacy Academic standing Committee (COP-ASC) during the Second Professional Year. The independent course of study and the credit hours of enrollment are determined by the COP-ASC based on the subject being remediated.

6622 SPECIAL TOPICS FOR PHARMACY PROFESSIONAL YEAR 2 (VARIABLE)

Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean of the College of Pharmacy

A required course for students placed on academic probation by the College of Pharmacy Academic standing Committee (COP-ASC) during the Second Professional Year. The independent course of study and the credit hours of enrollment are determined by the COP-ASC based on the subject being remediated.

6631 SPECIAL TOPICS FOR PHARMACY PROFESSIONAL YEAR 3 (VARIABLE)

Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean of the College of Pharmacy

A required course for students placed on academic probation by the College of Pharmacy Academic Standing Committee (COP-ASC) during the Third Professional Year. The independent course of study and the credit hours of enrollment are determined by the COP-ASC based on the subject being remediated.

6632 SPECIAL TOPICS FOR PHARMACY PROFESSIONAL YEAR 3 (VARIABLE)

Prerequisites: Permission of the Dean of the College of Pharmacy

A required course for students placed on academic probation by the College of Pharmacy Academic Standing Committee (COP-ASC) during the Third Professional Year. The independent course of study and the credit hours of enrollment are determined by the COP-ASC based on the subject being remediated.