College of Education

Dean : Dr. Sylvia Gist

Interim Associate Dean :
Dr. Nancy Grim

Graduate Degrees
Doctor of Education
Master of Arts
Master of Arts in Teaching
Master of Science in Education

Programs
Bilingual Education
Curriculum & Instruction*
Early Childhood Education*
Educational Administration**
Educational Leadership
Elementary Education
Library, Information, and Media Studies
Middle School Education
Physical Education
Reading
Secondary Education
Special Education
Technology Education
*Curriculum & Instruction Options
Early Childhood Education
Instructional Foundations
**Educational Administration Options
General Administration
Higher Education Administration

College of Education Courses
Education
Health & Safety
Reading
Recreation
Secondary Education
Special Education

Vision and Mission

We envision the College of Education (the College) as a global leader that informs and transforms urban education through the development and delivery of practice-based programs for education professionals who (a) demonstrate best practices in teaching and learning, (b) reveal knowledge through research and scholarship, and (c) provide service through outreach efforts.

The College’s mission is to offer quality programs and services that prepare education professionals [leaders, teachers, counselors, diagnosticians, librarians, information specialists, leisure personnel and others] to plan, organize, deliver, assess, support and oversee instruction and related activities. Further, the College is committed to fostering effective practices in settings with significantly diverse populations.

The College pursues its Vision and accomplishes its Mission through activities that meet the following Goals:

  • Sustain a caring, cohesive and supportive College team that fosters collaborative relationships throughout the College, University and community.
  • Recruit, retain and prepare education professionals who are recognized for their effectiveness of teaching, quality of research, depth of scholarship, concrete understanding of pedagogy, unremitting service, productive leadership and exemplary community outreach activities.
  • Model best practices in teaching that are informed by research, integrated with technology and validated by the learners’ quest for knowledge across the life span.
  • Prepare candidates to engage and utilize systemic and systematic assessments that ensure accountability, enhance efficient utilization of resources, fulfill expectations of stakeholders, and address the demands of the contemporary job market.
  • Provide comprehensive and coherent standards-aligned programs that develop content knowledge.
  • Develop and sustain collaborative outreach relationships with schools, libraries, non-profit and commercial organizations, and other institutions that meet the needs of schools, communities and workplace settings.
  • Foster commitments to diversity, social justice, and service to linguistically and culturally diverse learners.
  • Promote democratic leadership.

Beliefs and Values

We believe that all candidates can support student learning. To ensure success, faculty and staff in the College of Education are committed to planting and cultivating the following values among candidates:

  • Commitment to Excellence– We expect our candidates to demonstrate best practices in education by continuously pursuing professional preparation centering on content area knowledge; implementing local, state and national standards, and employing assessment strategies designed to ensure quality and accountability.
  • Promotion of Well Being—We expect our candidates to provide a positive nurturing environment where collaboration is grounded in sensitivity to individual dignity and to the concept that all students should be afforded equal access to quality education.
  • Global Preparedness—We expect our candidates to display a commitment to professional preparation that is informed by standards and exemplified through the preparation of learners for a technology-ready, global environment.
  • Reliability and Integrity—We expect our candidates to be dependable, accept responsibility, and to consistently adhere to ethical standards in all settings.
  • Civility—We expect our candidates to show respect for others (tone of voice, body language, personal etiquette, empathy, etc.) and an understanding of and sensitivity to cultural differences.
  • Life-Long Learning and Scholarship—We expect our candidates to engage in the pursuit of learning as a lifelong process with branches that reach across many academic disciplines to enhance human growth and to promote intellectual and cultural development.

Conceptual Framework

The conceptual framework embraces the College of Education's mission, philosophy, model and purposes for preparing education personnel, and the knowledge bases undergirding them. The initial and advanced programs for teachers, administrators and specialists are designed to reflect these concepts for preparing education personnel. Our conceptual framework reflects a shared vision, set forth coherently, with attention to candidates’ professional commitments and dispositions. It communicates our commitment to diversity, technology and our belief that our candidate proficiencies are aligned with professional and state standards. The Conceptual Framework applies to both the College’s graduate and undergraduate programs and their candidates. It serves as the model for how the College of Education Prepares All Candidates To Support student learning.This preparation is characterized and distinguished by five core themes: (P) Professionalism, (A) Assessment, (C) Content knowledge, (T) Technology, and (S) Standards.

Accreditation and Assessment

The College of Education has been accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) since 1954. Initial certification programs in the College that meet NCATE-approved guidelines of their specialty organization include: Bilingual, Elementary & Middle School Education (Association for Childhood Education International – ACEI and National Middle School Association); Early Childhood Education (National Association for the Education of Young Children – NAEYC); Physical Education (National Association for Sport and Physical Education – NASPE); and Special Education (Council for Exceptional Children -CEC). Secondary programs in the College of Arts and Sciences meeting NCATE-approved guidelines are: Secondary Biology, Chemistry, & Physics (National Science Teachers Association – NSTA); Secondary English (National Council of Teachers of English – NCTE); Secondary Geography and History (National Council for the Social Studies – NCSS); and Secondary Mathematics (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics – NCTM). All teacher education programs are approved for certification by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE).

All College of Education programs and the undergraduate College of Arts & Sciences Secondary Education Option programs participate in an annual assessment cycle to measure indicators on the following key assessment instruments: (1) Licensure, (2) Content Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions, (3) Planning, (4) Effective Practice, (5) Impact on Student Learning and the Learning Environment [Senior Thesis Capstone Project], and (6) Professional Portfolio and Dispositions. Programs may require additional identified assessments in order to meet national and state accreditation requirements.

Accountability Policy: All candidates must perform at or above the acceptable level on all indicators for each key assessment in order to be eligible to complete the program. Programs are committed to providing an opportunity for candidates to address areas of concern that are identified at checkpoints that occur at specific intervals in the program (such as the mid-point or exit-point). Candidates who have unresolved issues at any checkpoint will not be permitted to move to the next stage of the program.

Academic Degree Programs

Graduate teacher education programs leading to initial certification are offered in early childhood education, elementary education, bilingual elementary education, and secondary education in the following designations: biology, business education, chemistry, English, family and consumer science, geography, history, industrial technology, mathematics, and physics. In addition K-12 programs are available in art education, music education, physical education, Spanish, and special education (preK-21). The College of Education offers advanced certification in general administration (building level/principal and district level/superintendent); library, information, and media studies; reading and special education.

All teacher preparation programs have received Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) approval for teacher certification. Students earning the Master of Arts, Master of Arts in Teaching, or Master of Science in Education in one of the initial or advanced certification programs qualify for state of Illinois teacher certification by entitlement. In addition, the doctoral studies program in educational leadership has one or two tracks that leads to entitlement in a superintendent’s endorsement. 

Non-certification programs include: doctoral studies in educational leadership, bilingual education, curriculum & instruction (early childhood education and instructional foundations), early childhood education, higher education administration, physical education, and technology & education. In addition, the College offers advanced certification for school service personnel such as social work and school counseling through degree programs in the College of Arts & Sciences.

Effective July 1, 2010 the College of Education will be structured under the following areas: 1) Bilingual and Early Childhood Education; (2) Elementary Education; (3) Secondary & Middle School Education [Career & Technology Education; Health, Physical Education & Recreation; and Middle School & Secondary Education (K-12 & 6-12)]; (4) Graduate Studies [Instructional Foundations and Administration, Physical Education, Special Education and Reading]; (5) Library, Information, & Media Studies [Library, Information, and Media Studies and Technology & Education]; and (6) Doctoral Studies [Educational Leadership]. Please refer to the College of Education website at http://www.csu.edu/ CollegeOfEducation/ for more details.

The College of Education also offers undergraduate degrees programs and certification. Please refer to the CSU Undergraduate Student Catalog or the following website for more information: http://www.csu.edu/ CollegeOfEducation/departments.htm.

College Support Services

College support services are organized into these three areas: (1) Teachers’ Development Center (TDC); (2) Community Outreach and Field Placement Services (CO/FP); (3) Certification and Cohort Services (CCS).

1) Teachers’ Development Center (TDC)

The Developmental Support, Technical & Building (DS/TB) Services unit offers academic support for approximately 72 hours per week, six days a week, of computer and technology assistance to students in the COE building during instructional semesters or special terms. The main Teacher Development Center (TDC) is located in ED 308B with satellite computer laboratories located in ED 310 and ED 202.

One major goal of this unit is to assist students to develop academic readiness knowledge, skills and dispositions with a particular emphasis on test preparation for three State of Illinois certification examinations: (1) the Illinois Certification Test of Basic Skills (ICTBS) (math, reading, writing, and grammar), (2) an Illinois Content Area Test in specific designation knowledge areas, and (3) the Assessment of Professional Teaching (APT) which measures attainment and application of best practice pedagogical knowledge.

The TDC unit provides courses, workshops, and other intervention services to ensure that all students are successful on standardized examinations required for certification and to meet program requirements. Additional support is available through individualized tutoring plans, workshops, online modules, editorial services and writing instructional support, and technology assistance.

Staff members are proficient in the use of LiveText , online courseware, document production software and hardware, and digital media. Furthermore, the TDC provides building and technical support to facilitate faculty, staff, & student requests for access to technology equipment such as projectors, computers, laptops, and other digital media; and support for wireless Internet access as part of the Technology Anytime, Anywhere for Teachers (TAAT) Laptop Initiative. TDC staff coordinates the LiveText Help Desk <livetext@csu.edu> which is operated out of ED 202 and is supported in the ED 310 computer laboratory. Contact Developmental Support at <twrc@csu.edu> or (773) 995-2215. Additional information is located on the College website at http://www.csu.edu/CollegeOfEducation/twrc/. Technical support requests may be generated by completing a form located on the College website at http://www.csu.edu/CollegeOfEducation/cite/. Send questions to <cite@csu.edu> or (773) 995-2348.

2) Community Outreach & Field Placement Services (CO/FP)

The primary mission of the Community Outreach and Field Placement (CO/FP) Services is to provide a high quality field experience program for teacher education candidates in all majors during the last few semesters of their teacher preparation program. Preceded by an internship that varies in length according to program, student teaching is the culminating field experience of all teacher education programs in the College. During student teaching, the prospective teacher works full time in two 8-week placements with different age groups or in one placement for approximately 16 weeks. The candidate works under the supervision of a campus-based supervisor (university faculty member) and a field-based supervisor (school district faculty member).

In cooperation with educators and professional staff, candidates are assigned to local schools to complete field experiences, practica, and/or internships. During internships, candidates gradually assume full responsibility of the classroom instruction. The pace of the transition from teacher-aiding to full teaching is determined by the campus and field supervisors.

The student teaching experience is considered by many to be the most important phase of professional preparation; this is the time the prospective teacher applies and tests the principles, theories, and methods learned in the teacher education program. During student teaching, the student may observe for a short period of time and gradually assume the responsibility for as many as five assigned classes. The pace at which this gradual transition is made, however, is done at the discretion of a cooperative agreement between the field and campus-based supervisors.

A second part of the CO/FP mission is to provide community outreach services that (1) facilitate establishing partnerships with school districts that may lead to school reform projects and alternative certification pathways, among other initiatives; (2) support opportunities for diverse experiences, including schools based in urban, suburban, rural and international settings; and (3) identify financial and other support to assist candidates through their internship and student teaching experiences. CO/FP staff supplement information dissemination efforts while in the field community and on campus.

Because of close relationships established with the community-at-large and beyond, this unit provides a range of outreach services to support enrollment, retention, and graduation activities. Activities include fundraising efforts for College of Education and CSU Foundation student scholarships, alumni outreach and support, and recruitment services that inform the community about programs available in the College, following up on leads to assist in the establishment of alternative route cohorts, etc. Additional information is located on the College website at http://www.csu.edu/CollegeOfEducation/ FieldPlacement/. Contact the CO/FP Services unit at <ofp@csu.edu> or (773) 995-2392 or ED 322.

3) Certification and Cohort Services

The College of Education has the responsibility of recommending students completing an entitlement program for all initial, subsequent, and advanced certificates, and for additional endorsements at the time of certification. No one may be recommended for certification to teach or supervise in the public schools of Illinois who is not of good character, good health, at least nineteen years of age, and a citizen of the United States or legally present and eligible for employment, and has completed all requirements in the approved certification program, including state certification tests and compliance with the College criminal background check policy and related state and federal statues. Additional requirements, such as drug testing, may be implemented to be in compliance with local, state, and federal policies or laws.

In recognition of the importance of long-range planning for advising and its relationship to assuring compliance with state and federal certification and employment statues, teacher certification counselors have been assigned to each academic program and/or unit. These individuals will be supported by the Assistant to the Dean for Accreditation and Certification, who is responsible for monitoring the state licensure process for students completing an education program leading to teacher certification or certification in school administration, counseling, or social work. Workshops are held each semester for all students completing teacher, administrative, and school service personnel certification programs. At these workshops, students expecting to complete all requirements that term receive all materials and instructions to begin the process for applying for their certificates and additional endorsements.

In addition, the Alternative Route to Certification and Cohort Services unit is charged with the development and operation of alternative routes to credentialing programs that operate under the cohort model. These programs typically involve individuals at the postsecondary or the post-baccalaureate levels who wish to be placed in a school setting while earning a bachelor’s or master’s degree plus certification. This office also assists in program administration initiatives for advanced degree and/or cohort programs.

Early and continuous consultation and careful planning are essential for students who are seeking to satisfy initial teacher certification requirements. Additional information is located in ED 312 and on the website at http://www.csu.edu/CollegeOfEducation/TeacherCertification/. Questions may be directed to TeacherCert@csu.edu> or (773) 995-2519.

College of Education Policies

Listed below are additional College policies in effect prior to or on July 1, 2010 that may impact or affect College of Education students. The College maintains the right to revise, add, and/or inactivate policies as needed. The College maintains a summary of policies on the website at:
http://www.csu.edu/CollegeOfEducation/ policy.htm. 

1) Graduate University Admissions

All students in advancedprograms need to be admitted into the University through the Graduate College prior to applying for formal admittance to the College of Education professional course sequence. Information related to the application for admission to the institution may be located at http://www.csu.edu/GraduateSchool/. Contact the Graduate College at <G-Studies1@csu.edu> or (773) 995-2404.

Students who hold bachelor’s degrees and who wish to apply for initial teacher certificationprograms apply directly to the academic department using the program application on the COE website at http://www.csu.edu/CollegeOfEducation/TeacherCertification/.

2) College of Education Admissions

Enrollment in an initial teacher preparation program requires admission to the College of Education as a pre-requisite to all teaching methodology courses, student teaching, and other professional education courses in the course listings. Admission to the College of Education is based on academic record, good character, and proficiency in basic skills. Students who meet all admission requirements are eligible to apply to the College of Education for formal admission. Application forms are available online at http://www.csu.edu/CollegeOfEducation/TeacherCertification/applications/and must be submitted to the designated certification counselor in each academic program.

Applications for Admission to the College of Education are due at the following intervals:

Admission Term

Registration Period

Deadline

Fall

Advance

March 1

 

Regular

June 1

Spring

Advance

October 1

 

Regular

December 1

Summer

Advance Regular

March 1

Admission Criteria

  • Academic Record: Admission to the College of Education in a master’s degree program requires a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 in the final 60 semester hours of bachelor’s degree courses. In addition, admission to the Masters of Arts in Teaching Programs requires a 3.0 GPA in 18 hours of coursework beyond the introductory and 100 levels in a 32-hour major.
  • Admission to student teaching in MAT programs requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all courses required in professional education and all courses toward the master’s degree. The exceptions are: admission to student teaching in the MSEd programs in Special Education and Library Information Systems. The Special Education program requires a minimum GPA of 2.0 in general education, a minimum GPA of 3.0 in specialization courses, and a minimum GPA of 2.5 in professional education. The Library Information Specialists program requires a minimum GPA of 3.0 in general education requirements and in specialization courses, and a 2.5 in professional education courses.
  • Admission to the College of Education in a non-degree certification-only program requires a minimum program GPA of 2.5 in all coursework required in the teacher preparation program, either as transfer credit or completed at Chicago State University. Effective Fall 2007, admission to the College of Education requires minimally acceptable grades in all program applicable coursework completed at Chicago State University. At the time of admission, students must be within 12 semester hours of completing their general education requirements.
  • Character : Admission to the College of Education requires that candidates have no unresolved violations of the COE Professional Code of Conduct and a ‘clear’ criminal background check. Admission to the College of Education also requires a personal reference and a recommendation from the academic department.
  • Basic Skills : Admission to the College of Education requires a passing score on the Illinois Certification Test of Basic Skills (ICTBS) within the last eight years preceding admission. The ICTBS is offered several times a year. Test dates, registration materials, the study guide and a practice diagnostic test are available online at http://www.icts.nesinc.com. Please Note:Current State of Illinois Certification policy prohibits an individual from taking the ICTBS more than 5 times. Undergraduate admission also requires the successful completion of the University qualifying examinations in English composition, mathematics, and reading, unless the ICTBS was passed prior to the time of admission to Chicago State University in a teacher education program.

Policies for Admission to the College

  • Admission to the College of Education is required prior to registration in professional education courses other than ED 1520, ED 2000, ED 4312, ED 5000, ED 5400, ED 5650, PSYC 2020, PSYC 5830, S ED 4301, and courses specified in the general requirements for each program. Students may receive an administrative withdrawal from those courses if they have not met all admission requirements by the end of the preceding term.
  • Students who make application for admission to the College of Education will be required to own, or have access to a laptop computer for class use.
  • Students who are not admitted to the College of Education because of a low grade point average will be allowed to reapply for admission at any time within the next 30 semester hours of attempted credit and according to the requirements for admission in effect at the time they reapply. Students who do not meet the grade point average required for admission to the College of Education after attempting an additional 30 semester hours of coursework will be dropped from the program.

Policy for Certified Teachers Seeking Additional Endorsements and/or Certificates

Certified teachers may qualify for a waiver of admission to the College if they provide a current State of Illinois Initial or Standard Teacher Certificate to the certification counselor in the academic department offering the needed course(s) for a designated endorsement or certificate program. If the teacher registers for a course that has a field experience hour requirement, teachers may submit proof of employment in a school setting and evidence to demonstrate a ‘clear’ background check to satisfy the background check requirement.

Policies for Post-Baccalaureate Students Seeking Initial Certification

Individuals who possess a bachelor’s degree and wish to earn an initial teacher certificate may apply as certification students for admission to a non-degree (described in this section) or a master’s degree approved program that satisfies state of Illinois certification. Students enroll as post-baccalaureate students at the graduate level but follow the undergraduate initial certification program requirements. Certification programs leading to initial certification are available in early childhood education, elementary education, middle & secondary education, or K-12 education.

Certification students may make an appointment with certification counselors in the academic departments to have their transcripts evaluated in order to determine eligibility for the master’s degree program and deficiencies in courses necessary for initial certification. Initial certification requires completing the approved certification program, including the successful completion of state certification examinations in Basic Skills, Content Area, and Assessment of Professional Teaching. Students who have completed a teacher preparation program here or elsewhere, but are not certified in Illinois, and who have been evaluated by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) to determine specific course deficiencies for an initial teacher certificate, may enroll in courses leading to initial certification through ISBE transcript evaluation. Students who have been issued an ISBE deficiency statement must meet requirements for admission to the College of Education and course pre-requisite requirements in order to enroll in teaching methodology courses or student teaching.

Students who obtain certification through ISBE transcript evaluation are enrolled as graduate students-at-large and are not eligible to receive an institutional recommendation from Chicago State University for certification in Illinois or in any other state. Students holding a current State of Illinois Initial, Standard, or Master Teacher Certificate are exempt from meeting the College of Education admission requirements prior to enrolling in certification courses. Certified teachers must present a current certificate to a certification counselor in the academic department before enrolling in certification courses for the first time. The following certificates do not qualify for this exemption: substitute, transitional bilingual, provisional vocational, administrative, and school service personnel. Please contact the Certification and Cohort Services unit at <TeacherCert@csu.edu> or (773) 995-2519 or visit ED 312, for assistance. Additional information is located on the College website at http://www.csu.edu/CollegeOfEducation/TeacherCertification/.

3) Student Teaching Admissions

Admission Criteria

The teacher education program at Chicago State University has established critical guidelines for student teaching to ensure program integrity and to provide quality educational experiences. All students completing an initial teacher preparation program are required to student teach five full days per week for 16 weeks.

To be eligiblefor student teaching, the student must have:

  • been admitted into the College of Education.
  • presented evidence of a passing result on both the Illinois Tests of Basic Skills and the Certification Content Area Test.
  • attained a minimum GPA of 2.5 which is required in the following: all coursework required in the program (Program GPA); all coursework in the area of specialization or concentration (with the exception of Art Education, which requires a minimum GPA of 3.0); and all coursework in professional education (with the exception of Elementary Education and Early Childhood Education, which require a minimum GPA of 3.0). Higher grade point average requirements may be included in individual program listings.
  • completed all course and departmental pre-requisite requirements, including a minimum of 100 hours of pre-clinical field experience, a pre-clinical field practicum and/or internship, and the successful completions of an oral interview examination.
  • a current tuberculosis test (PPD).
  • a ‘cleared’ background check, including fingerprint analysis (and drug testing, as appropriate).
  • a signed copy of Article 21 of the Illinois School Code.
  • zero unresolved violations of the COE Professional Code of Conduct and the Dean’s Expectations on Dispositions on file.

General Student Teaching Polices

  • Students are strongly encouraged to complete a one credit hour review course for the Illinois Teacher Certification Content Area Test prior to taking the exam. Students must submit proof of passing the certification test to the certification counselor assigned to the academic program before they will be allowed to student teach. Programs reserve the right to require this course as needed to meet accreditation requirements.
  • Very few courses may be taken during the semester of student teaching. Exceptions include the following courses: BIL 4100/5100, ED 0910, 4311, 4440, 4610, 4988/5988, 4999; HS 1570, 4020/5020, 4030/5030, 4040/5040, 4050/5050, 4060/5060, 4070/5070, 4080/5080, 4400/5400, 4420/5420, 4440/5440, 4500/550, 4560/5560, 4570/5570, 4600/5600, 4610/5610, 4620/5620, 4630/5630, 5995, 5980, 5988, 5990; LIMS 4001/5001, 4002/5002; PE 3040; PSYC 4210; READ 4150/5150, 4180/5180; S ED 4200/5200; T&ED 2392, 3347; and program-approved endorsement courses in drivers education, early childhood, elementary education, science, mathematics, technology, reading, bilingual, ESL, and special education.
  • Qualified students are required to attend a Student Teaching Application Meeting one semester preceding the term they expect to student teach. This meeting is held each Fall and Spring Semester on the third Tuesday after the beginning of day classes. The specific dates are published through University Relations via print and digital media mechanisms. Students who do not meet application deadlines must reapply the following semester.

Student Teaching Option for Full-time Substitutes

Full-time substitute teachers enrolled in a master’s degree or non-degree certification program for initial certification may qualify for a student teaching option in their own classroom without relinquishing their position or salary if they meet the following criteria:

  • Minimum grade point average of 3.0 in each of the following areas: all coursework required in the program, in the area of specialization or concentration, and in professional education.
  • Minimum of six semesters of full-time teaching experience with total responsibility for an assigned classroom.
  • Classroom assignment matching the area of certification the semester before student teaching.
  • Three positive evaluations of classroom teaching performance from current school principal and one from the campus-based internship supervisor.
  • Request from school’s principal for student teaching placement in current classroom and identification of a site-based supervisor.
  • Recommendations from two teaching colleagues in the school.
  • Professional development outside of coursework in the form of in-services, workshops, conferences, and/or membership in professional organizations.
  • Portfolio of sample curriculum materials, lesson plans, and an analysis and reflection to demonstrate a meaningful impact on student learning or the learning environment.
  • Passing scores on the Illinois Certification tests of Basic Skills, Content Area and Assessment of Professional Teaching.
  • Completion of 50 secondary and 50 elementary field experience hours (by students in K-12 programs only).
  • Minimum of 100 field experience hours in public schools if student teaching assignment is in a private school (no field experience hours can be waived for teaching experience).

For additional information concerning student teaching or the student teaching option for full-time substitutes, contact the Community Outreach & Field Placement (CO/FP) Services unit, ED 322, (773) 995-2392, <ofp@csu.edu>.

4) Program Completion

  • A grade of B or above is required in student teaching.
  • All candidates must pass the Illinois Assessment of Professional Teaching (APT) certification test in order to receive a grade in student teaching, be eligible to complete a program and/or to graduate.
  • Candidates will submit a Professional Portfolio and the Candidate Impact on Student Learning or the Learning Environment Project that fulfills the Senior Thesis Capstone Project requirement.

5) Professional Code of Conduct and Dean’s Expectations on

Dispositions Policy

All candidates are provided a list of pedagogical and general dispositions and are asked to periodically self-assess their understanding in the following areas:

Pedagogical Dispositions

Area 1 – Classroom Delivery and Demeanor (Including Differentiation)
Area 2 – Collaboration
Area 3 – Creative and Critical Thinking
Area 4 – Life-long Learning and Scholarship

General Dispositions

Area 1 – Relationships with Others
Area 2 – Reliability
Area 3 – Willingness to Collaborate
Area 4 – Reflective Practice
Area 5 – Personal Appearance

The College of Education is committed to ensuring that all candidates successfully complete their program with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions required to enter the profession of teaching prepared to help all children learn (NCATE Standard 1, 2008, Professional Standards for NCATE Accreditation) or to enter other professions. This includes adherence to the Dean’s Expectations on Dispositions as well as the Professional Code of Conduct. The Professional Code of Conduct is formally assessed at the following four checkpoints in all teacher education programs leading to initial certification, and at other appropriate checkpoints identified in the college’s non-teacher education programs: 1) enrollment in professional courses containing field hours, 2) admission to the College of Education, 3) admission to student teaching, and 4) graduation and/or certification.

Candidates must not have any unresolved violations of the Professional Code of Conduct in order to continue in their program past any of these checkpoints. The Professional Code of Conduct includes (but is not limited to): academic integrity, accountability, appropriate language, civility, cleanliness, fairness, honesty, justice, punctuality, reliability, professional ethics, non-discriminatory behavior, respect, trustworthiness, and other aspects of professional behavior.

Candidates who are observed violating any aspect of the Professional Code of Conduct can be given the opportunity to correct their behavior after consulting with the party who has observed the violation, or with the party’s or candidate’s academic department. If the problem is not successfully resolved, a referral can be made by the party observing the violation, his or her academic department, or the candidate’s academic department, to the College’s Admission and Standards Committee (ASC) for a final resolution.

Candidates who have a history of violating the Professional Code of Conduct (whether the violations are resolved or unresolved) can be referred to the Admission and Standards Committee at the discretion of a concerned member of the University community. The ASC will review the referral and render a decision regarding the candidate’s status in the program, in accordance with standard ASC referral review procedures.

6) Policies Regarding Background Checks

Students registered for courses tied to field experiences that require being placed in a school, or in direct contact with a minor (birth to age 21), must undergo a background check and be found to be ‘clear’ with no hit record. The Criminal Background Check (CBC) process will access the State of Illinois, FBI Criminal History Record Information (CHRI), Illinois Sex Offender Registry, Illinois Child Murderer, and National Sex Offender Public Website databases. The College reserves the right to enforce compliance mechanisms (such as drug testing) as required by local, state, or federal agencies or entities as set forth by current laws or policies. Students who do not have documentation on file to support a determination that they are ‘clear’ will be issued a ‘CE Hold’ which may prevent registration and access to online records. Additional details are available at [http://www.csu.edu/CollegeOfEducation/ backgroundcheck.htm].

7) Additional College of Education Policies

  • Students are responsible for meeting the program requirements in effect at the time they officially register in a teacher education program leading to certification at Chicago State University, regardless of when they entered the university.
  • The following courses are designed to develop technology skills among education personnel: PE/REC 2070, ED 4312/5312, T&ED 2120, & T&ED 4346/5346. Enrollees for these classes are expected to provide their own laptops (Either MAC or PC) for use in class. Instructors for these classes should be prepared to use both the MAC and PC platforms in every section of the course.
  • A maximum of nine credit hours of professional education courses taken at a junior or community college can be transferred into a teacher preparation program.
  • Professional education courses completed more than five years before admission to Chicago State University in an education program, either as transfer credit or at Chicago State University, will not be accepted. Other restrictions on the time limit for completing coursework may be included in individual program listings.
  • A grade of C or above is required in all courses in an initial teacher preparation program, either as transfer credit or completed at Chicago State University, including: all courses in general education; 1) all required courses in the area of concentration (elementary education, early childhood education, bilingual education) and/or area of specialization (with the exception of the secondary teaching option in chemistry, which allows one grade of D); 2) all required supportive courses; and 3) all other courses in professional education; unless otherwise stated in the general requirements for each program.
  • A grade of B or above is required in PSYC 2040 and student teaching courses.
  • A CSU cumulative G.P.A. of 2.0 in all courses completed at CSU in an undergraduate program is required for graduation. Other grade requirements may be listed under the General or Specific Requirements for each program.
  • All graduate programs require a minimum G.P.A. of 3.0 for courses applied to a master’s degree, including courses taken in professional education. The doctoral program in educational leadership requires a minimum G.P.A. of 3.5 for courses applied to the Ed. D. in Educational Leadership.
  • Courses taken at Chicago State University that are required in a teacher education program may be repeated for a higher grade no more than twice. The highest grade will be included in calculating the grade point average. Students who do not earn an acceptable grade in a required course after three attempts will be dropped from the program.
  • A maximum of two professional education courses can be repeated for a higher grade. The higher grade will be included in calculating the grade point average. Students who earn an unacceptable grade in a third professional education course will be dropped from the program.
  • Students who are dropped from a teacher education program are not eligible to pursue initial teacher certification in any undergraduate, graduate, or non-degree program at Chicago State University.

Procedures for Filing a Grievance

The College of Education provides education students with a written copy of students’ responsibilities, rights, and procedures for reinforcing those responsibilities and rights. Causes for grievances shall include, but are not limited to, arbitrary or capricious behaviors in regards to:

  1. Admission to a teacher preparation program;
  2. Admission to the student teaching program or other clinical experience;
  3. Dismissal from the teacher education program, including clinical or student teaching experiences;
  4. Evaluation of the candidate’s performance in courses, clinical or student teaching settings, or other regularly provided or required activity having a direct bearing on the candidate’s being recommended for certification or for employment; or
  5. Failure to recommend the candidate for certification when requested in a timely fashion.

Before a case can be heard by the College Grievance Committee, it must proceed through three prior levels of deliberation which is documented by the student on the ‘Student Concerns/Inquiry Record’ form. These levels include the following:

  1. Conference between student and instructor/staff;
  2. Conference between student and department chairperson;
  3. Hearing before the Department Grievance Committee.

To initiate a hearing before the College Grievance Committee, the student must complete the ‘Petition for Hearing’ form and return it along with the ‘Student Concerns/Inquiry Record’ form to the Dean’s office in ED 320. It is the student’s responsibility to obtain the appropriate signatures at each stage of the process. Failure to follow instructions will result in the form being returned, thus delaying the requested hearing.

Petitions filed by students based on circumstances that could constitute a request for an academic adjustment or modification on the basis of a disability as defined by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 will be referred to and processed by the Abilities Office for Disability Services. 

The composition of the College Grievance Committee shall be:

  1. The Dean of the College of Education, or an administrative representative;
  2. Two faculty members or one faculty member and one administrator not from the department involved;
  3. One student from the department involved;
  4. One student not from the department involved.

The Dean or an administrative representative shall appoint, convene, and chair the committee. A committee is formed for each case and is disbanded at the completion of that case. The ordinary rights of parties at a hearing (student or instructor) shall apply, including the right to notice of hearing and decision reached, the right to be present at hearing, and the right to present and inspect evidence. The committee makes recommendations to the Dean within five business days of the hearing. The Dean’s decision is final. Specific procedures for the hearing of each case shall be determined by the members of the committee deliberating that case.

Title II Report Card

Best Practices:

  • School-based methods courses taught in Chicago and suburban schools give students the opportunity to apply theory, innovative practices and pedagogy in real school settings; including international opportunities such as the Field-Based/Internship program trips to Taiwan.
  • Prior to student teaching, all candidates participate in an internship under the supervision of both school and University faculty, preferably done in the same school.
  • Candidates enrolled in field-based internship programs teach lessons daily for two or more semesters and receive feedback from school and University supervisors.
  • Candidates develop professionally through systemic reflection, analytical journal writing, and e-portfolios. Senior thesis formalizes the capstone action research project on candidate’s impact on student learning and the learning environment.
  • Secondary and K-12 education candidates complete a major in their area of specialization.
  • ISBE Recognition was awarded to the College for an Early Childhood Special Education Approval sequence, ESL/Bilingual Endorsements, & Gateways Credentials for Early Childhood Level 5, Infant Toddler Level 2, & Illinois Director Level II.
  • Eight College computer laboratories and wireless access facilitate technology-infused learning experiences. Students receive web-enhanced curriculum and wireless access for learning. Online/Hybrid/Distance Learning programs are growing in Library, Information, and Media Studies; Technology & Education (Information Technology Certificate and Corporate Safety Management Certificate); Reading and Recreation.
  • Technology & Education training is available for professional certificates in Cisco CCNA, A+, CWSP, and Network+.
  • Alternative Route to Certification pathway programs are offered; such as the Resident Teacher Programs in Early Childhood, Elementary and Secondary Education, Library Information Specialist, General Administration/Principal, Reading, and Special Education.
  • Students participate in practice tests and review workshops for the Certification Tests of Basic Skills, Subject Matter Knowledge, and Assessment of Professional Teaching.
  • National Board Certification (NBC) concentration in Instructional Foundations was created to improve minority recruitment.
  • Illinois Community College Board Associate of Arts in Teaching Articulation Agreements have been created in Early Childhood, Science Education, Mathematics Education, and Special Education/Elementary Education; including a direct partnership pipeline in Early Childhood with Harold Washington Community College.
  • Dual Enrollments Agreements enacted between CSU and Kennedy King College in Early Childhood/Child Development and Physical Education/Recreation.
  • Reading and Educational Leadership Certificate programs were developed for higher education community college faculty.
  • The Doctoral Studies in Educational Leadership program oversees publication of the peer-reviewed Illinois School Journal. In addition, the Center for Urban Research in Education has facilitated publication of the peer-reviewed Urban Visions Online Journal since 2001.
  • Faculty-driven Outreach Partnerships: Project Nueva Generacion; CSU-University of Minnesota (UMM) Rural Urban Diversity Project; CSU-Mt. Vernon Nazarene University (OH) Diversity Pathways Project; Secondary Resident Teacher Cohort & Dual-Credit Agreement with Youth Connections Charter Schools (YCCS), Guardian-A-Program (GAP) with elementary and high schools; Ghana, West Africa Literacy, Numeracy and Environmental Studies Textbook Program, Child Studies program for Head Start staff; After School Matters Sports 37; Field-Based Teacher Internship Programs (Joyce Foundation, MacArthur Foundations and IBHE); Educational Leadership School Reform; Teacher Quality Enhancement Middle School Project (ISBE, IBHE, ICCB, CSU, NEIU, SEIU-C, SEIU-E); & the CSU TQE Institute: Cougar Academy for Teachers targeted toward Junior and Senior high school students aspiring to become middle school teachers.

Notable Features and Accomplishments:

  • In 2008, CSU enrolled approximately one-third(30.12%) of all students of African descentwho attend Illinois public universities.
  • In 2008, CSU awarded 10.5 percent of all degrees to black males who attended Illinois public universities. (Illinois Total = 1363/CSU Total =143 =10.5%)
  • CSU ranked 1 st among all Illinois public universities for awarding Master’s Degrees in Education to African American/Black non-Hispanics; ranked 18th in the nation (7,126 institutions) for awarding Master’s degrees Education to African American/Black non-Hispanics;
  • CSU ranked 2 nd in Illinois in for awarding Bachelor’s Degrees in Education to Black non Hispanics; Ranked 48th in the nation (7,126 institutions) for awarding Bachelor’s Degrees in Education to African American/Black non-Hispanics.
  • CSU ranked 16 th among all Illinois institutions for awarding Master’s Degrees in Education to all racial and ethnic groups.
  • National Board Certification (NBC) is the “gold standard” in teaching. Nationwide, there were more than 74,000 National Board Certified Teachers (NBCTs) in 2008, including 3,191 in Illinois. Chicago Public School (CPS) employed 328 NBC credentialed teachers in 2008; increasing the district’s total to 1,191. Almost 10 percent (36) of the 328 new achievers used the National Board Resource Center at CSU during the 2007-2008 NBC cycle. In addition more than 10 percent (123) of the 1,191 were CSU alums.
  • The College of Education has been consistently accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) since 1954, the first year that NCATE accredited institutions.
  • In 2009, CSU was one of only 24 Illinois institutions (57 total) accredited by NCATE.
  • CSU is one of two Chicago-based public institutions of higher education accredited by NCATE.
  • All CSU teacher preparation programs are approved for certification by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE).
  • CSU’s Doctor of Education degree in Educational Leadership was approved by the Illinois Board of Higher Education in June 2004 and by the North Central Association of Colleges and Universities in April 2005.
  • CSU awarded its first doctoral degree in spring 2009. Dr. Angela Roberts-Watkins was recognized as the first doctoral degree recipient from Chicago State University by the U.S. House of Representatives and entered in the Congressional record by Congressman Bobbie Rush.
  • The Recreation Program was accredited in 2008 for five years by the National Recreation and Parks Association/American Association for Physical Activity and Parks (NRPA/AAPAP).
  • Chicago State University edited the Illinois Schools Journal (ISJ) for Chicago Public Schools from 1906 to 1920 and has published ISJ since 1920.
  • Over 28 CSU graduates have received the Golden Apple Award for Excellence in Teaching since 1987.
  • CSU students have received the Kohl, Golden Apple Scholar, and the Illinois Student Laureate Awards.
  • 56 Distinguished Educator Awards have been presented to alums and faculty since 2003.
  • The Faculty engages in research, publishing, and presentations at local, national, and international conferences.
  • Over 200 teachers have graduated from alternative pathways to certification programs.
  • According to 2010 U.S. News and World Report, CSU ranks fourth in Illinois in awarding baccalaureate degrees to Latino students in education.
  • In 2000, Logan Square Neighborhood Association (LSNA) and Chicago State University partnered to start a Grow Your Own Teachers program with classes in the neighborhood at LSNA's Monroe CLC. In 2009, seven former parent mentors and teacher aides have graduated from CSU with degrees in bilingual education, and 54 more teacher candidates are on their way.
  • The Bilingual Education Program at CSU received national recognition in the October 22, 2007 issue of U.S. News and World Report for the Illinois Grow Your Own Teachers Program. This award-winning project has brought many communities, universities and elementary and high schools together, and will prepare educators to teach in underperforming schools in their own community by 2016.

Program Information – Academic Year 2009

(July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2009)

S.1 Total number of students admitted into teacher preparation, all specializations, in academic year 2008-2009

291

S.2 Number of candidates in supervised student teaching in academic year 2008-2009

140

S.3 Number of faculty members who supervised student teachers:

---

S.3A Full-time faculty in professional education

15

S.3B Part-time faculty in professional education but full-time in the institution

9

S.3C Part-time faculty in professional education, not otherwise employed by the institution

1

S.4 Total faculty student teaching supervisors

25

S.5 Student teacher/faculty ratio (Divide total given in S.2 by the number given in S.4)

3:1

S.6A The average number of student teaching hours per week

35

S.6B The total number of weeks of supervised student teaching required

16

S.7 Average total number of hours required

560

Annual Institution Report – Program Completer Pass Rate Data

Illinois Certification Testing System

Program Year: 2008-2009

Institution:007 - Chicago State University

Number of Program Completers: 168

Test Field/Category 

Institution

Statewide

 

Number Tested

Number Passed

Pass Rate

Pass Rate

Basic Skills

 

 

 

 

Basic Skills Test

113

113

100%

100%

Aggregate

113

113

100%

100%

Professional Knowledge/Pedagogy

 

 

 

 

101 APT: Birth to Grade 3

13

13

100%

100%

102 APT: Grades K-9

62

62

100%

99%

103 APT: Grades 6-12

36

36

100%

100%

104 APT: Grades K-12

57

57

100%

99%

Aggregate

168

168

100%

99%

Academic Content Areas

 

 

 

 

105 Science: Biology

3

--

--

100%

106 Science: Chemistry

1

--

--

100%

107 Early Childhood Education

12

12

100%

100%

110 Elementary/Middle Grades

64

64

100%

100%

111 English Language Art

5

--

--

100%

114 Social Science: History

11

11

100%

100%

115 Mathematics

9

--

--

100%

116 Science: Physics

2

--

--

100%

163 Special Education General Curriculum

16

16

100%

99%

135 Foreign Language: Spanish

3

--

--

100%

143 Music

4

--

--

100%

144 Physical Education

14

14

100%

100%

145 Visual Arts

2

--

--

100%

Aggregate

146

146

100%

100%

Other Content Areas

 

 

 

 

171 Business, Marketing, and Computer Education

4

--

--

100%

175 Library Information Specialist

15

15

100%

100%

Aggregate

19

19

100%

100%

Teaching Special Populations

 

 

 

 

155 Learning Behavior Specialist I

14

14

100%

100%

Aggregate

14

14

100%

100%

 

 

 

 

 

Summary Totals and Pass Rate

168

168

100%

99%