Secondary Teaching in English Option

The secondary English/Language Arts program consists of undergraduates seeking Bachelor of Arts degrees and initial state licensure and graduate candidates seeking a Master of Arts in Teaching and/or initial state licensure. CSU’s secondary English/Language Arts program utilizes the Illinois State Board of Education’s [ISBE] Illinois Teaching Standards, National Council for Teachers of English [NCTE], and the Modern Language Association [MLA] to align curriculum, assessment, and instruction. In addition, CSU’s secondary English/Language Arts program has begun to align course material to the Common Core and Career Readiness Standards.

Admission to the program is contingent upon good academic standing and acceptance by the department. Admission to the College of Education [COE] is required prior to registration in any professional education courses other than ELCF 1520 and 2000; Psyc 2100; SPED 4301; and READ 4330.

The Department of English, Foreign Languages, and Literature strives to implement the Chicago State University College of Education’s PACTS conceptual framework in the preparation of secondary teachers of English/Language Arts. The department offers candidates the opportunity to benefit from the expertise of journalist, published authors, and scholars of American, British, and African American literature. Candidates are required to become involved in professional organizations and encouraged to remain involved after graduation.

Secondary Education Advisor

Professor Darrell Darrisaw

Testimonials

General Requirements

  • A grade of C or above is required for all general education, English and professional education courses and supportive courses [trasnfer or completed at CSU].
  • A maximum of 9 hours of professional education courses can be transferred into the program.
  • Professional education courses taken more than 5 years prior to admission into the program or the COE [either transfer or CSU courses] will not be accepted.
  • A cumulative grade point average of 2.5 in the area of specialization, in professional education, and in all coursework in the program [both resident and transfer courses].
  • Candidates may repeat a course, for a higher grade, no more than twice.  Candidates who do earn an acceptable grade in a required course after three attempts will be dismissed from the program.
  • Candidates who are not admitted into the COE due to poor scholarship may reapply at any time within the next 30 semester hours of attempted credit.  Candidates who do not qualify for admission after the additional 30 credit hours will be dismissed from the program.
  • A 1 credit hour review course for the Illinois Teacher Certification Content Area Examination is required.
  • Candidates may not be enrolled in any other courses during student teaching.

Before proceeding to any 4000 level course in literature or professional education, students must have passed the English Qualifying Examination and completed English 2280.

For entry into the College of Education [COE], candidates must:

  • Complete an application process;
  • Receive a passing score on the state Test of Language Proficiency and the Illinois Certification Test of Basic Skills;
  • Have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or better on a 4.0 scale;
  • Have passed all courses with a C or better;
  • Have no more than 12 credit hours left to take in general education courses;
  • Submit a personal recommendation and a positive recommendation from the department;
  • Have an acceptable level of scores on the professional dispositions assessment;
  • Sign an Article 21 statement;
  • Have no unresolved disposition issues

For student teaching candidates must:

  • Take and pass the state Content Area Test #111;
  • Maintain a cumulative 2.5 grade point average;
  • Complete all professional education courses;
  • Complete all field experiences including a 100 clock hour internship;
  • Have an acceptable level on all performance based key assessments including content knowledge, planning, effective practice, the professional portfolio, and professional dispositions

For graduation , candidates must:

  • Take and pass the state Assessment of Professional Teaching #102 [APT];
  • Complete a 16 week, two-level student teaching placement with an A or B grade;
  • Make acceptable progress on all key assessments with the addition of the Assessment of Impact on Student Learning;
  • Have an acceptable rating on campus based and field based supervisor teaching observation assessments.

Pass the examination on the state and federal constitutions.

The completion of all requirements qualifies candidates for an Initial Type 09 [6-12] Illinois Secondary Certificate and a middle [6-8] endorsement in Language Arts.

Complete 125 credit hours in:

Required English Courses

General Education=44 credit hours
Area of Specialization= 48 credit hours
Professional Education= 33 credit hours

General Education

English Composition= 6hrs
Natural Sciences=9 hrs [one lab course]
Social Sciences=15 hrs
Mathematics=6 hrs
Health and/or Physical Development=2 hrs
Humanities=6 hrs

Area of Specialization

English 2100
English 2160
English 2190
English 2260
English 2330
English 2340
English 2410
English 2910 or 2940
English 4311
English 4316
English 4390
Communications 1130

One 3 hr. course from each category

History/Grammar/Usage/Culture/ESL
Ethnic Literature
Period English Literature
American Literature

Professional Education

ED 4312
English 4347*+
ELCF 1520
English 4360*+
ELCF 2000
English 3630*+
Psyc 2020
CAS 2630*+
Spec. Ed 4301
English 3750*+^
Spec. Ed. 4303*+
ELCF 4500*+
Reading 4100*+

*=requires admission to the College of Education
+=requires passing score on Basic Skills Test
^=requires passing score on Content Area Test

Program Objectives

For successful completion of the Secondary Teaching Option, students must

  • be able to write coherent, well-organized exposition in several rhetorical modes using edited American English competently.
  • understand and be able to use effectively a variety of rhetorical forms and strategies of informative writing and write for a variety of audiences.
  • be familiar with the literature and major developments and writers of Great Britain and America.
  • be familiar with a significant body of literature by American writers of color.
  • be familiar with a significant body of literature by women.
  • be familiar with a significant body of European and non-Western literature.
  • be familiar with a significant body of adolescent literature.
  • be able to analyze works of literature, understand a variety of critical approaches, and demonstrate an awareness of the characteristic elements and techniques of the various genres.
  • understand traditional, structural, and transformational/generative grammars, be acquainted with the nature of language, observe language development, history, dialects, and acquisition, and be able to apply this knowledge in teaching the language arts.
  • be able to deal positively and effectively with dialectal and cultural variety among students.
  • have a practical and theoretical understanding of the writing process, forms of discourse, and strategies for teaching these.
  • be able to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of student writing and to provide appropriate instruction and counseling.
  • understand the nature of reading and the processes used by students in learning to read and be cognizant of appropriate reading materials and strategies.
  • be familiar with and be able to analyze critically non-print media, their relation to print media, and their uses in teaching and learning.
  • be skilled in speech communication and knowledgeable about the role of speech in the arts and sciences in teaching and learning.
  • have working knowledge of instructional strategies and materials used in developing oral competence in adolescents.
  • be able to demonstrate specified teaching skills in video-taped micro-lessons taught to peers.
  • be acquainted with the problems and techniques of teaching mildly handicapped and language disordered students.
  • understand the processes of adolescent and learning psychology.
  • be familiar with the philosophy, organization, and structure of American public education and the problems of secondary schools.
  • understand the roles and responsibilities of practicing English teachers.
  • be familiar with professional organizations and journals.
  • be able to incorporate research findings into the instructional program.
  • be willing and able to identify their own strengths and weaknesses and outline a plan of self-improvement.
  • be able to use effective ways of teaching English: to select and adapt methods and materials and develop a sequence of assignments to guide and motivate students with varying interests and abilities who come from varying environments and ethnic backgrounds.
  • be able to prepare, use appropriately, and interpret a variety of testing instruments and procedures to assess student progress.
  • be able to think critically about issues, to articulate varying points of view, and to take informed stands on issues of concern to the profession.
  • be able to communicate instructional information to students and to communicate with students, parents and administrators respecting the student's progress and course of study.

Area of Specialization (Courses) - Number and Name

1.    2100 EDITING (3)
        Prerequisite: Successful completion of English Qualifying Examination and
        English 136 or consent of the department

2.    2160 SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE I (3)

3.    2190 SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE II (3)

4.    2260 ELEMENTS OF LITERARY STUDY (3)
        Prerequisite: Successful completion of English Qualifying Examination

5.    2330 READINGS IN BRITISH LITERATURE I (3)

6.    2340 READINGS IN BRITISH LITERATURE II (3)

7.    2410 THIRD WORLD LITERATURE (3)

8.    2910 AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)
        Prerequisite for all 300 level courses in English: Successful completion
        of the English Qualifying Examination

9.    4311 SHAKESPEARE (3)

10.  4331 LITERARY CRITICISM (3)

11.  4338 LANGUAGE (3)

12.  4390 WOMEN'S VOICES (3)

13.  4335 DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN ENGLISH (3)
        or
       4336 AMERICAN ENGLISH GRAMMAR (3)
        or
       4339 CURRENT ENGLISH USAGE (3)
        or
       4361 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (3)
        or
       4366 TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (3)
        Prerequisite: ENG 338 or consent of the department

14.  4321 BLACK WOMEN WRITERS (3)
        or
       4322 BLACK AMERICAN POETRY (3)
        or
       4323 WRIGHT, ELLISON AND BALDWIN (3)
        or
       4324 GWENDOLYN BROOKS SEMINAR (3)
        or
       4332 BLACK AMERICAN FICTION (3)
        or
       4334 THE IMAGE OF BLACKS IN AMERICAN PROSE FICTION (3)
        or
       4370 THE AMERICAN ETHNIC EXPERIENCE IN LITERATURE (3)
        or
       4382 THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE (3)
        or
       4384 AFRICAN-AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY (3)
        or
       4386 MORRISON, WALKER, HURSTON (3)

15.  4314 VICTORIAN LITERATURE (3)
        or
       4326 STUDIES IN ROMANTIC LITERATURE (3)
        or
       4342 BRITISH LITERATURE SINCE 1918 (3)
        or
       4349 THE ENGLISH NOVEL (3)
        or
       4357 THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE (3)
        or
       4358 ENGLISH LITERATURE OF THE 17th CENTURY (3)
        or
       4359 LITERATURE OF THE 18th CENTURY (3)

16.  4341 AMERICAN LITERATURE SINCE 1918 (3)
        or
       4345 AMERICAN LITERATURE 1820 - 1865 (3)
        or
       4346 AMERICAN LITERATURE, 1865 - 1918 (3)
 

Professional Education (Courses) - Number and Name

4347 TEACHING COMPOSITION (3) FIELD/10 CLOCK HOURS
4360 TEACHING LITERATURE (3) FIELD/10 CLOCK HOURS
4363 TEACHING ENGLISH IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS (Grades 6-12)(3) FIELD/30 CLOCK HOURS
4375 STUDENT TEACHING: SECONDARY LEVEL ENGLISH (6) FIELD/FIVE FULL DAYS/SIXTEEN WEEKS

May be taken only after completion of all other course
requirements.

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